Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  On an Avacado tree
Geographic location of the bug:  Davis, California
Date: 05/09/2019
Time: 03:27 PM EDn
Your letter to the bugman:  I have found a few of these on the tree, wondering if they are a pest or beneficial.
How you want your letter signed:  Pat

Bush Katydid Nymph

Dear Pat,
We would need you to more clearly define “pest or beneficial” but in our opinion, this is a beneficial Katydid nymph.  Katydids will eat foliage and flowers, but they will not defoliate trees, nor will it eat your avocados.  Katydids are also among the “music makers” in the insect world, and we thoroughly enjoy their sounds in the evening.  We believe your individual is an immature Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia.

Thank you for your response. I suppose those terms do include some subjectivity, I guess I was just wondering if I should be concerned seeing a handful of them on a young tree?
Thanks again,
Pat
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly eggs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeast Pennsylvania
Date: 05/01/2019
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
I found this yesterday on my rose bush, April 30, 2019
I used the iNatuarlist app to try to identify, if briefly showed up as dragon/darner fly eggs
How you want your letter signed:  Natalie DelGiorno

Katydid Eggs

Dear Natalie,
These are most definitely NOT Dragonfly Eggs.  Dragonflies oviposit in the water, not on dried branches.  These are Katydid Eggs.

Katydid Eggs

Thank for answering. I found a picture on the web
I have the eggs in an aquarium, hoping they will hatch as a science project for kids
I also found a a preying mantis egg sac, an optics,(sure the spelling is wrong. It looks like half is broken, but I put it in an aquarium too
The thing about the preying mantis egg is that I saw her last October near the place where I found the eggs. There are also 2 others!
Thanks again
Natalie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colorful red legged grasshopper/katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Ivans, UT
Date: 12/31/2018
Time: 10:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We took this pic 9/23/2017 in Ivans, Utah (aka St. George, Utah)
It stayed long enough for me to take a picture but flew off right after. Tried to find anything similar but to no avail.
Never seen anything like this before! Absolutely stunning!!
How you want your letter signed:  Megan Silcox

Western Bush Katydid

Dear Megan,
Our editorial staff has returned to our home office and despite the holiday, we decided to make a new posting, so your identification request is our first of the New Year.  This is a Western Bush Katydid in the genus
Insara, and in our opinion, it most resembles the Creosote Bush Katydid, Insara covilleae, which is pictured on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not report that species for Utah.  The related Elegant Bush Katydid, Insara elegans, is reported from Utah on BugGuide, but its markings appear different.  We are confident with our genus identification but would prefer that a true expert weigh in on the species.  Happy New Year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What are these strange pods?
Geographic location of the bug:  NSW, Australia
Date: 12/26/2018
Time: 03:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have these brown pod things in my cupboard outside. They’re about as wide as my finger and are stuck to the underside of a shelf lengthways. They appeared a few days ago. It is summer.
How you want your letter signed:  Should I be afraid?

Probably Katydid Eggs

Dear Should I be afraid?
Though your image lacks critical sharpness, we nonetheless believe these are Katydid Eggs.  Here is an image from Bower Bird of Australian Katydid Eggs.  Katydids are similar to Grasshoppers, and they will feed on plants in the garden, but they should not cause you any fear, though large individuals, especially predatory species, can have powerful mandibles that could conceivably deliver a painful bite, so they should be handled with caution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orthoptera Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Manzanillo, Costa Rica
Date: 12/19/2018
Time: 11:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please help me identify this orthoptera?
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  7Song

Katydid Ovipositing

Dear 7Song,
This is a marvelous image of a female Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae and she appears to be in the act of laying eggs.  It looks similar to the Tico Katydid,
Melanonotus tico, which is pictured on Getty Images.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to get his opinion.

Katydid Correction Courtesy of Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
It is a female of Idiarthron, based on the location (Limon Province) most likely I. hammuliferum.
Cheers,
Piotr

Ed. Note:  There are images of this species on the Orthoptera Species File Online.

Thank you for your reply Daniel. I have been looking for someone to help me with this photo for a while now. I look forward to your response.
~7Song
Whoops, I missed the second response, so thank you again. And a thank you to Piotr.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  San Jose, Costa Rica
Date: 12/03/2018
Time: 01:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this a few weeks ago in San Jose Costa Rica in the late afternoon. Note the barb. What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Jim R

Katydid

Dear Jim,
This is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and what you have described as a “barb” is actually an ovipositor, an organ adapted to function during the egg laying process, indicating that this is a female.  We do not recognize the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination