Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper or Cricket?
Geographic location of the bug:  Vantage (WA), Ginkgo Petrified Forest
Date: 10/26/2019
Time: 12:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you have any idea what it is? It looks like a cricket, but I could not found it with Google.Best regards, Nils
How you want your letter signed:  Nils B.

Mormon Cricket

Dear Nils,
Though it is commonly called a Mormon Cricket, Anabrus simplex is actually a Shield-Backed Katydid.  Though they are flightless, in some years they are quite common and they form swarms along the ground in search of food.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Your individual is also a female as evidenced by her ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I’ve seen two.
Geographic location of the bug:  Broederstroom South Africa
Date: 10/20/2019
Time: 12:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. Seen two different bugs on our farm over the years. They’re big. 20cm long. https://www.instagram.com/p/NwOR6jDkQA/?igshid=psx84ahumm6z

How you want your letter signed:  Graham

Winged Predatory Katydid

Dear Graham,
This is one impressive Katydid.  We quickly located it on Photographs from South Africa where it is identified as a Winged Predatory Katydid,
Clonia wahlbergi.  Like the individual in that posting, your individual is a female as evidenced by her sickle-like ovipositor.  It is also pictured on IUCN Redlist.

Morning Daniel
That is great. It’s been bothering me for over 5 years as to what it was.
When I was playing with it we gave it some fruit and it was eating it.
So then it’s omnivorous?
Thank you
Graham

Hi again Graham,
Many predatory Katydids are opportunistic feeders, and they will eat vegetation as well as other creatures.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  large emerald grasshopper?beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  crested butte co
Date: 10/06/2019
Time: 08:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  thanks for your help! i saw several of these in the mountains above crested butte-they were about 2″ across
How you want your letter signed:  kris

Mormon Cricket

Dear Chris,
Though it is commonly called a Mormon Cricket, your insect is actually a large, flightless Katydid. According to BugGuide:  “Though flightless, this species can form migratory swarms or “bands” that travel on foot, eating almost anything (both plant and sometimes small animal) in their paths, and have been significantly destructive to rangeland and crops at times. Swarming occurs primarily in the Wyoming Basin, Colorado Plateaus, Great Basin, and Columbia Plateau. In the Sierras, Rockies, and other higher mountain areas, and on the northern Great Plains, individuals average smaller, are usually non-migratory, and coloring is commonly of lighter colors (often tan or green). Individuals in bands are most commonly of a deep brown, often nearly black color.”   The ovipositor indicates your individual is a female.

hank you so much!  what a treat to learn the name of this katydid!
cheers!
chris
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large green bug on my house in August
Geographic location of the bug:  Wanaque, NJ 07465 USA
Date: 09/22/2019
Time: 09:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this large green bug on the side of my house on a sunny hot afternoon in August. I live in Northern NJ not far from Ramapo State Forest. I have never seen this bug before or since. I would love to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Mark

Common True Katydid

Dear Mark,
This is a male Common True Katydid, one of the music makers of the insect world.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Deciduous forests–often heard, but seldom seen, since mostly lives in forest canopy.”

So that’s what a Katydid looks like! Thank you so much!
-Mark W.

Our pleasure.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland, OR
Date: 08/20/2019
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I took this photo of this beautiful insect and I wanted to know what exactly it is? My guess is a grasshopper.
Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Katydid

Hi Jenn,
The quick answer is that this is a Katydid, and Katydids and Grasshoppers are in the same insect order Orthoptera.  The most obvious difference between Katydids and Grasshoppers is that Katydids have much longer antennae.  We are having difficulty determining the genus and species.  Your individual looks very similar to this image on Pacific Northwest Photography Forum, but it is only identified as a Katydid.  This might be a Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia which is profiled on BugGuide.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a more definitive identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beauty?
Geographic location of the bug:  Granger, Indiana
Date: 07/31/2019
Time: 03:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty chillin’ on my snowball bush.  Seemed like a friendly guy.  I loved the red making on its back and it reminded me a bit of a grasshopper. What do you think it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Alida

Katydid Nymph

Dear Alida,
Thinking your submission was of a beauty significantly affected our desire to view what you were describing.  This is an immature Katydid, possibly a Lesser Angle-Winged Katydid based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide, Indiana is well within the range of this species.  Katydids and Grasshoppers are both classified withing the same insect order, Orthoptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination