Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Meadow Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Chattanooga, TN
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 11:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe this is a female Meadow Katydid but can’t tell which type.  Thoughts??
How you want your letter signed:  Myra Reneau

Handsome Meadow Katydid

Dear Myra,
Because of the blue eyes, we believe your Meadow Katydid is a Handsome Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum pulchellum, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Note white face with brownish to reddish mottling on edges, brown legs, diffuse turquoise stripe on upper sides back along wings. Eyes usually blue–fairly distinctive.”

Thank you very much for the idea. Feel free to use my photo if you would like to.
Myra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Santa Barbara Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Barbara CA
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 11:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy crawled into our house today.  Can’t figure out what it is! Any thought what it might be? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Alison

Male Mexican Bush Katydid

Dear Alison,
This is a male Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia, and we believe it is the Mexican Bush Katydid, Scudderia mexicana because BugGuide states: “The only Scudderia species found in Los Angeles” with the further elaboration that it “Displaces S. furcata in its southwestern range, and overlaps range in California north from about Monterey County.”  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Like other Katydids, the males are able to make sounds to attract a mate and they are among the chorus of insects that fill the warm summer evenings with sounds.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large gross bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Hilton Head, SC
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 11:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on my porch… it is about 4-5 inches long, its legs look like a grasshopper, face/antennae  looks like a shrimp. It is expelling a thin brown liquid.
How you want your letter signed:  C. Gates

Round Headed Katydid, we believe

Dear C. Gates,
This is a Katydid, and the ovipositor protruding from the tips of her wings identifies her as female.  We believe this is a Round Headed Katydid in the genus
Amblycorypha based on BugGuide where it states:  “have long legs (hind femora extent almost to tips of tegmina) like Scudderia, but more rounded wings, and overall shape of Microcentrum, though rather more rounded (esp. tegmina), esp. in ♀♀. Top of the head rounded, strongly deflexed. Green, but some species, esp. A. floridana, have a pink phase (some have a yellow phase as well).”  The brown color of your individual is not especially common.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  katydid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Mill, SC
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This big one was hanging out on my back door this morning.  In one of the photos you can see his really long antennae. Do you happen to know the proper species name of this one? Amazing how it looks so very similar to a leaf!
How you want your letter signed:  R. Tregay

Greater Angle-Winged Katydid

Dear R. Tregay,
This looks to us like a female Greater Angle Winged Katydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults active in late summer and fall. September-November (Michigan).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black killer wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois
Date: 08/16/2018
Time: 04:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These two were battling it out, but the wasp won in the end. I thought it may have been a cicada killer, but this one was all black, maybe a little Blueish.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Great Black Wasp and Katydid Prey

Dear Karin,
We are thrilled to be able to post your wonderful images of a female Great Black Wasp and her Katydid prey.  The wasp has stung and paralyzed the Katydid and she it trying to get it back to her underground burrow.  She is probably climbing the table to give her some height so she can take off and glide toward her nest.  According to BugGuide:  “Provision nests (in burrow in soft earth) with Katydids or grasshoppers. ”  Also commonly called Katydid Hunters, these solitary wasp are not aggressive toward humans.

Great Black Wasp and Katydid prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Shield backed katydid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Newton County Georgia
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 10:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just checking my ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Rosmarie

Two Female Katydids:  Lesser Meadow Katydid (left) and Bush Katydid (right)

Dear Rosmarie,
Your image depicts two different immature female Katydids that have not yet grown wings and their respective ovipositors are quite different in appearance.  The individual on the left appears to be an immature female Lesser Meadow Katydid in the genus
Conocephalus, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, there are “18 species” that are rather similar looking and “Females oviposit in grass-stems. One generation per year.”  We believe your other Katydid on the right is an immature female Bush Katydid in the genus Scudderia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “8 spp. in our area” and “Most species probably favor foliage of broad-leaved woody deciduous plants, but probably will feed on a variety of other plants. Often (especially nymphs) seen feeding on flowers of assorted, often herbaceous plants.”  Both of your individuals are in the subfamily Phaneropterinae, so they are not Shield-Backed Katydids in the subfamily Tettigoniinae.     

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination