Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Koringkriek
Location: 25 km before Colesberg area
December 27, 2016 12:48 pm
We found this koring krieket at our overnight stay coming back from Betties Bay.
Signature: Hendrik

Koringkriek

Koringkriek

Dear Hendrik,
Your Koringkriek image is a marvelous documentation of this South African Katydid.  According to Piotr Nakrecki of The Smaller Majority:  “Despite their bulky appearance and scary-looking armature, these wonderful katydids are, like most insects, completely harmless. Their spikes and horns are nothing more than protection against birds and lizards, and can only be used to make their body more difficult to swallow – they cannot jab, poke, or cut anybody with their armor. The katydids’ only other defense is reflexive bleeding, quite similar to that seen in oil beetles that I recently wrote about. But unlike the beetles, whose blood contains deadly cantharidin, that of the katydids is not toxic. And, in contrast to other katydids who sometimes try to nibble you if handled, armored katydids never, ever bite, no matter how roughly they are treated.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect in Australian Wet Tropics
Location: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
November 24, 2016 6:16 pm
Hi folks,
Please see the pix (on one MSWord doc of 2 pages; I tried sending JPGs but they won’t go through). The insect is huge. The body is about 2 inches long. It was photographed at night in tropical rainforest.
Enjoy your Thanksgiving and thank you.
Signature: Jim (Hackett)

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Spiny Rainforest Katydid

Dear Jim,
This is a Katydid and we identified it as a Spiny Rainforest Katydid,
Phricta aberrans, thanks to Oz Animals where it states:  “The Spiny Rainforest Katydid is a very unusual subtropical rainforest katydid from eastern Queensland and northern New South Wales. The body and legs have numerous thorny spines and antennae are very long. The insect is greenish above with different shades of green and brownish colours providing excellent camouflage; the underside is pale.”  There is a nice image posted to ipernity.  The ovipositor on your individual indicates she is a female.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much. It is is fact more likely to be the closely related Phricta spinosa, which ranges in rainforest from Cooktown to Innisfail. Cairns is in the middle of this range.
Jim.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Seattle, WA
November 13, 2016 4:14 pm
Hi, Bugman!
I found this pretty little lady on my front porch last night and would love to know what she is? I’m in Seattle, and it has been really warm recently (a lot warmer than most Novembers!). I’ve never seen a bug this precious here before! No wings, was a great jumper, and seemed very alert but also pretty calm. Very nice bug! What is she? Thanks!
Signature: Shiv

Female Drumming Katydid

Female Drumming Katydid

Dear Shiv,
This female Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum, is not a native species to Seattle.  It was introduced from Europe and is now well established in the Pacific Northwest.

Thank you so much for being able to find out what it is! I really appreciate your time and the identification, thank you! Have a great day!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshoppers
Location: Madera Canyon, AZ
November 4, 2016 2:18 pm
Many different species of grasshopper in the multible biomes of this southeastern part of Arizona near the Sky Islands and in Madera Canyon. A mix of oak woodlands, succulents and pines in the upper region. I’ve tried to ID them online, but nothing looks quite what I photographed. One naturalist said one was a differential grasshopper, but again I didn’t see the resemblance.
Signature: Thank you, Leanne Grossman

Greater Meadow Katydid

Greater Meadow Katydid

Dear Leanne,
We believe we have a second identification for you.  Grasshoppers generally have shorter antennae, and we believe this individual is a male Greater Meadow Katydid in the genus
Orchelimum, and we also believe he is an immature specimen as the wings are not yet fully developed.  Compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  There are Arizona sightings on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “many Orchelimum have some white mottling or other coloration, such as red.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper in Piedmont region Georgia.
Location: Piedmont Georgia
November 9, 2016 6:12 pm
Trying to identify this grasshopper. Here’s a link http://m.imgur.com/2wFb2rh it’s gorgeous, I just want to know what it is! Thanks!
Signature: Mariah Dalton

Red Headed Meadow Katydid

Red Headed Meadow Katydid

Dear Mariah,
This is not a Grasshopper, but rather a Katydid, and even more specifically a Greater Meadow Katydid in the genus Orchelimum.  We believe this is a Red Headed Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum erythrocephalum, based on this BugGuide image and the description on BugGuide that states:  “Coloration typically green with reddish highlights, including a (usually) bright red head in both sexes. Eyes light blue. Red head is (apparently?) distinctive in this genus, however some specimens do not show a bright red head.”  The sickle-shaped ovipositor at the tip of the abdomen indicates that this is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshoppers
Location: Madera Canyon, AZ
November 4, 2016 2:18 pm
Many different species of grasshopper in the multible biomes of this southeastern part of Arizona near the Sky Islands and in Madera Canyon. A mix of oak woodlands, succulents and pines in the upper region. I’ve tried to ID them online, but nothing looks quite what I photographed. One naturalist said one was a differential grasshopper, but again I didn’t see the resemblance.
Signature: Thank you, Leanne Grossman

Female Katydid

Female Mexican Bush Katydid

Dear Leanne,
Anyone who uses the term “biomes” in a request is worth corresponding with in our estimation.  While all of your submitted images depict members of the order Orthoptera which includes Grasshoppers, not all of your Orthopterans are Grasshoppers.  The green individual with the long antennae is a Katydid, and the antennae distinguish Longhorned Orthopterans from the suborder Ensifera from the Grasshoppers which are classified in the suborder Caelifera.  The upturned, sickle-like ovipositor identifies your Katydid as a female, and the shape of the ovipositor is often a factor in species identification.  Alas, we have not the necessary skills to identify your species without research, but we wanted to begin the posting nonetheless.  Since Katydids are categorized separately from Grasshoppers on our site, we will finish addressing this identification as well as your other images in the near future.

Update:  Hello again Leanne,
Based on this BugGuide image, we believe your female Katydid is a Mexican Bush Katydid,
Scudderia mexicana, and despite its name, its natural range includes both the Southwestern States and Mexico.  Insects have no respect for international borders.  The fun site Arizona:  Beetles Bugs Birds and more has a December 13, 2011 posting that includes an awesome image of a female from the genus using her ovipositor to create a repository for her eggs on their proper food plant.

Thank you again, Daniel. Best regards,
Leanne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination