Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland, OR
Date: 08/20/2019
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I took this photo of this beautiful insect and I wanted to know what exactly it is? My guess is a grasshopper.
Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Katydid

Hi Jenn,
The quick answer is that this is a Katydid, and Katydids and Grasshoppers are in the same insect order Orthoptera.  The most obvious difference between Katydids and Grasshoppers is that Katydids have much longer antennae.  We are having difficulty determining the genus and species.  Your individual looks very similar to this image on Pacific Northwest Photography Forum, but it is only identified as a Katydid.  This might be a Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia which is profiled on BugGuide.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a more definitive identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beauty?
Geographic location of the bug:  Granger, Indiana
Date: 07/31/2019
Time: 03:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty chillin’ on my snowball bush.  Seemed like a friendly guy.  I loved the red making on its back and it reminded me a bit of a grasshopper. What do you think it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Alida

Katydid Nymph

Dear Alida,
Thinking your submission was of a beauty significantly affected our desire to view what you were describing.  This is an immature Katydid, possibly a Lesser Angle-Winged Katydid based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide, Indiana is well within the range of this species.  Katydids and Grasshoppers are both classified withing the same insect order, Orthoptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid Eating It’s Tail?
Geographic location of the bug:  Atlanta, Georgia
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 11:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  One more! This katydid has been hanging out on my front porch for 2 days now. I went outside about 11pm and it appeared to be eating its tail. I took a video as I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. Do katydids self-cannibolize?
How you want your letter signed:  Chel

Female Common True Katydid

Dear Chel,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are confident this is a female Common True Katydid, and what you are calling its tail is actually an ovipositor, and organ the female uses when laying eggs.  The position your Katydid is in indicates she might be trying to lay eggs, based on this image of a Costa Rican Katydid and this image of a Katydid laying eggs in captivity, both from our archives.  Your individual might have been grooming her ovipositor, which appeared to you to be autocannibalism.

Female Common True Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Any ideas what this is?
Geographic location of the bug:  Travelers Rest SC
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 12:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m wondering if you can help me identify this? It’s in a corner of the porch ceiling.
How you want your letter signed:  margottc

Common True Katydid

Dear margottc,
This is a male Common True Katydid,
Pterophylla camellifolia, and you can verify its identity by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  The female of the species has a stinger-like ovipositor.  According to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Foliage of deciduous trees, and shrubs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper, Katydid, or something else?
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin, Texas
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 03:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We hail from the northeast and have found that everything is bigger in Texas when it comes to insects!  This one didn’t jump or fly when we approached but lazily stretched one leg at a time almost as if exercising. My youngest was concerned when we found a brown version with large “stinger” but his brother though it to be an ovipositor.
How you want your letter signed:  The Meroff family

Katydid Nymph

Dear Meroff family,
This is an immature Katydid, but we are not certain of the species.  The fact that it is a nymph means it has not finished growing.  Your son is correct about the “stinger” actually being a harmless ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  North East Mexico Plague
Geographic location of the bug:  Monterrey
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Worried about our forest, infestation of this insect. What is it what is the impact. Millions of these in our forest.
How you want your letter signed:  Raul

Katydid: Pterophylla beltrani

Dear Raul,
This is a gorgeous Katydid, and with a little searching, we are confident we have identified it as
Pterophylla beltrani  thanks to images and maps on iNaturalist.  We located an article entitled Geographic Distribution and Singing Activity of Pterophylla beltrani and P. robertsi (Orthoptera:  Tettigoniidae), Under Field Conditions where it states:  “Pterophylla beltrani, locally known as grilleta or false locust, constitutes an important forest pest in northern Mexico.  Populations of this species began to increase … in 1975.”  Since this is a native, local insect for you, we have a problem thinking of the large numbers you witnessed this year as an infestation.  Rather, we prefer to think about it as a possible indication of climate change.  Some species might not survive a change in climate while others may thrive.  At this point in time, Green New Deal or not, we believe that there has already been an irreversible effect on nature due to the changes, climactic and otherwise, that increasing populations of humans on planet Earth have created.  That stated, no one knows what the future will bring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination