Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Denver, Colorado
Date: 02/11/2018
Time: 12:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I noticed this formation on my door frame. I wold like to know what it is. If it’s a pest I need too kill it with fire. But if its a harmless critter i would like to keep and study it.
How you want your letter signed:  Anthony McDonnell

Anglewing Katydid Eggs

Dear Anthony,
These are the eggs of an Anglewing Katydid which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  Adult Anglewing Katydids resemble large green grasshoppers, but with very long antennae, and they have wings that help camouflage them among the deciduous leaves that they feed upon.  Anglewing Katydids are solitary feeders and they do not harm trees because of the few leaves they eat.  Males call to the females and the “song” of a Katydid is a welcome summer night sound.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  moss mimic
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa rica
Date: 02/06/2018
Time: 06:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just curious if what this is.
If you want more details of where this was found please let me know.  I have lots more pictures of bugs.  I hope this works out.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  B Wright

Is there a Moss Mimic here?

Dear B Wright,
We feel like we are playing game of “Find Waldo” here because we can’t really see anything in your image that looks like anything but moss.  Perhaps it is the shallow depth of field that is obscuring any moss mimic you observed.  We even magnified the image, cropping to the very center, and we still see nothing that we are able to identify.  We have images of Moss Mimic Katydids from Costa Rica, a Moss Mimic Mantid from Costa Rica and a Moss Mimic Walkingstick from Costa Rica, but in most instances, they were photographed while not camouflaged on moss.  Perhaps you can resend the image, cropping to just where you saw the creature, and we can try again.

Find the Moss Mimic

Update:  Thanks to a new digital file from B Wright and a digitally enhanced image of the original courtesy of Insetologia editor Cesar Crash, we are ready to classify the Moss Mimic as a Katydid.

Maybe this will help.
Can you see it now?

Brian Wright  M.Ed, NBCT, ASM Master Teacher

Moss Mimic Katydid

Hi Brian,
Thanks for sending in a much sharper image.  This is clearly a Katydid, and her ovipositor is also visible, meaning it is a female.  Wing buds are also visible in your new image, meaning is it likely an immature individual or possibly a flightless species, more likely the former.  Cesar Crash of Insetologia digitally enhanced your original image and believes it is a Katydid in the tribe Pleminiini, but his enhancement missed the ovipositor.

Digitally Enhanced Original Image (courtesy of Cesar Crash)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this please?
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth Western Australia
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 02:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found in my carport.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you in advance

Katydid

The closest visual match we could locate online of your female Katydid are the postings of the genus Pachysaga on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket or Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Azerbaijan
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I’m not sure if this is a grasshopper or a cricket let alone its species.  Also is it a female as it has an enlarged ovipositor? If anyone can help me with the species and sex (if possible) I would be ever so grateful
How you want your letter signed:  AM

Shieldback Katydid

Dear AM,
This is some species of Shieldback Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae and it appears to have several red Mites on it.  You are correct that it is a female.

Oh wow thank you very much for such a fast reply and pointing out the mites, we weren’t sure what they were! I didn’t realise Katydids had wings? Out of interest how can you tell the difference between a cricket and katydid? Do you think it would be eating one of it’s own species, do you know in what situation they turn to cannibalism?
Many thanks,
Alice Marlow

Many Shieldback Katydids will eat their own species if necessary. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid in glorious pink?
Geographic location of the bug:  Goa, India
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 06:45 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this sitting on a gate in the foothills of the Western Ghats. 50mm long with 50mm antennae. Any idea?
How you want your letter signed:  Colin P

Katydid

Dear Colin,
We are posting your image of a Katydid, and we are contacting Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can assist in the identification of what we believe to be an immature individual. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Listroscelis or Arachnoscelis?
Geographic location of the bug:  La Cangreja National Park, Puriscal, San José, Costa Rica
Date: 01/09/2018
Time: 06:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Months ago I found this weird looking katydid. I know  it is from subfamily Listroscelidinae, but I’m confused about its genus. I think is a Listroscelis or an Arachnoscelis but can’t find out which the difference between them. Hope you can help me.
How you want your letter signed:  Dariel Sanabria

Male Katydid:  Arachnoscelis species

Dear Dariel,
Immature insects are often more difficult to identify than adults for several reasons.  First, they often look very different from adults, and secondly, adults are frequently more well documented than are immature stages.  We will send your image to Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a conclusive identification for you.

Piotr Naskrecki provides a correction and identification.
Hi Daniel,
This is indeed Arachnoscelis, an adult male. Hard to say which species without seeing a closeup of the abdominal apex.
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination