Currently viewing the category: "Hump Winged Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Lone Butte, British Columbia
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 06:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I’ve found a couple of these insects around our new property in the interior of BC and was wondering if this is some type of cicada, or is it something else entirely?? The ones I’ve been seeing appear to be hiding when found (in rock piles and old abandoned shacks).  When found they seem to only want to be on their back with legs in the air…very tricky to get them to flip over to see the pattern on the back. They are about an inch or so long, and 1/2 an invh wide (very chubby looking through the abdomen).  The one I found today had green stuff in its mandible area. Neither had fully developed wings so  thinking they aren’t yet adults, but seems to be getting late in the year to be seeing insects that haven’t fully developed yet…we’ve already seen snow here and daily highs are regularly in the single digits now. We live in a mature fir forest if that helps.
I’m really quite curious to know what these critters are, what life stage they are at, and if they are common to see in BC’s interior.
Thanks a bunch for any info you can provide.
How you want your letter signed:  Julie Kline

Great Grig

Dear Julie,
We believe this is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, and according to BugGuide, they eat:  “staminate flowers of coniferous trees, and flower parts & pollen of broadleaved shrubs; sometimes eats fruit and small insects” and “males stridulate to attract females or to announce territory; males also have fierce fights over territory and/or females.”  The habitat is described as “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.”  BugGuide even has an image of a Great Grig on its back as you describe.

Great Grig

Thanks Daniel,
Much appreciated! I did a bit more research after sending you this request and suspected the same thing. They really are pretty cool bugs.
Cheers,
Julie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large cricket?
Geographic location of the bug:  McCall, Idaho
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 10:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this guy on a camping trip at Ponderosa State Park. I’ve been trying to find similar images online but am having trouble. He is very friendly and seems to be flightless.
How you want your letter signed:  Ashley & my son Ben, Friend of all Bugs

Great Grig

Dear Ashley & Ben,
Your Hump-Winged Cricket or Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, which we identified on BugGuide is actually more closely related to Katydids and it is not a true Cricket.  The BugGuide description is:  “male dark gray dorsally, pale whitish ventrally, with short wings humped up and wrinkled like a loosely-folded blanked heaped on the insect’s back; male subgenital plate with a ventrally-directed process shaped like the nail-pulling claw of a hammer.  female either lacks wings or has them reduced to small stubs.”  Your individual is a male.

Great Grig and Ben

Great Grig

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Montana
Location: Montana, Rocky Mountain Front
August 21, 2017 4:14 am
No one seems to be able to identify the attached beetle. It was about two inches long.
Signature: Rick Regh

Great Grig

Dear Rick,
This is NOT a Beetle.  It is an Orthopteran, a member of the insect order that contains Crickets and Grasshoppers.  This is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, and we identified it thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  Though BugGuide data does not include Montana sightings, the University of Florida Entomology site does provide a range map that includes western Montana.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket?
Location: Vancouver BC
June 30, 2017 2:09 pm
This pic was sent to us from our some in Vancouver, BC. We have no luck identifying it.
Signature: Deb

Great Grig

Hi Deb,
We are confident by comparing your images to the images on this BugGuide posting that you have submitted images of a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa.  According to BugGuide, the range is “southern British Columbia and Alberta, south to northern California and southern Idaho” and the habitat is “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.”

Great Grig

Thank you. My husband used to collect insects,  but he had never seen this one before.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket
Location: Spokane, Wa
March 13, 2017 3:55 pm
One of my students brought this cricket to me this morning. I have tried to identify it with no luck. Any info would be greatly appreciated for me and my class.
Signature: Erin Parker

Great Grig

Dear Erin,
We believe this is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, or another member of the genus.  According to BugGuide, their habitat is “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Uhler’s or Great Grig
Location: Premiere Ridge, British Columbia
May 9, 2016 7:59 pm
I’m a forester working the Kootenays, British Columbia. We exposed this guy under some loose bark. I did a bit of research and figured it’s a Uhler’s or maybe a Great Grig or a hump winged cricket. Are these all interchangeable names for the same insect?
Signature: J. Rynierse

Great Grig

Great Grig

Dear J. Rynierse,
We believe this is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, whose name means “MONSTROSA: like a monster; very large and abnormally shaped or hideous (this species is the largest of the 3 in North America)” according to BugGuide,  though we would not rule out one of the other species in the genus identified on BugGuide.  We are not certain where you found the name Uhler’s Grig, but there is one image of a Great Grig on BugGuide that mentions the name Uhler’s Grig.  According to BugGuide, Hump Winged Crickets belong to the family Prophalangopsidae, and there is but one North American genus in the family, so globally, it is fair to say that all Great Grigs are Hump Winged Crickets, but there might be other Hump Winged Crickets elsewhere in the world that are not Grigs.  For your purposes in British Columbia, the two names are synonymous, though one is a family name and the other a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination