Currently viewing the category: "Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful grasshopper/locust
Geographic location of the bug:  Maropeng, Cradle of Humankind Visitor Centre
Date: 10/13/2018
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
We have just returned to the UK from a fabulous holiday in South Africa, during which we saw the locust/grasshoppers shown in the attached photos.  Could you identify it please.  We were outside the lower exit of the Cradle of Humankind at Maropeng at about 15:30 on 22 October 2018.  It was warm (~32C) and dry.  Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  David Gittens

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear David,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, probably
Phymateus leprosus based on this iSpot image.  The colors are variable, but generally they are aposomatic, meaning they are warning colors, a survival strategy employed by many insects that feed on milkweed.

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for the ID and fascinating information.  Although I have a great interest in wildlife in general I know very little about this category of insect, let alone those from RSA.  I had discounted the Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper on its colouration even though I wondered if it might have been in a breeding ‘plumage’.
Thanks again
David
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Riyadh Saudi Arabia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 11:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, cane across this beetle and looking to ID it
It was around the length of an iPhone 5 if that helps
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Usher Hopper

Dear Email,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we have identified a previously submitted individual as an Usher Hopper,
Poekilocerus bufonius.  According to TrekNature:  “The distribution ranges from Syria to Egypt and NW Saudi Arabia. … The genus Poekilocerus belongs to the family of highly colorful species that can be found in tropical regions around the world. This animal announced its non-patability by a yellowish secretion. Its preferred food are Milkweed plants, and the animal seems to harbour some of the bitter ingredients of the plants in its hemolymph.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating bugs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Goromondzi, nr Harare, Zimbabwe
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 08:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Are these two bugs a male and female mating? The smaller one on the back looked similar to a grasshopper.  Found out in the bush. The larger one appeared to struggle to move with the other on its back.
How you want your letter signed:  P Mcleod

Mating Grasshoppers

Dear P Mcleod,
These are indeed Grasshoppers, and it is not unusual for the female to be significantly larger than the male in many species of Grasshoppers which is obvious during mating.  We believe your individuals are in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.

Wow. Thank you for such a quick response. I should have realised the larger one was a grasshopper but I have never seen one like it before.
Thank you again
Phyllida
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Want to know the genus and species
Geographic location of the bug:  Himachal pradesh, India
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 08:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please tell me about this grasshopper
How you want your letter signed:  Mr.wild

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Dear Mr.wild,
This is an immature Painted Grasshopper or Ak Grasshopper,
Poekilocerus pictus, one of the toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  Jungle Dragon has some nice images of nymphs.  We also have images of brightly colored, winged adult Painted Grasshoppers on our site.  According to Your Shot National Geographic:  “Ak Grasshopper, is one of the most colorful grasshoppers of India. The nymphs display spots of varied colours from yellow, orange to blue and green. The adults show yellow and blue striped on head and thorax, a bright red abdomen, green-yellow forewings and red hind wings which are seen only in flight. The adults grow to about 60mm and are capable of good flight. The food is Giant Milkweed Plant.The eggs are laid in ‘pods’ (each pod contains 70 – 200 eggs) during the monsoon months.”

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Subject: Grasshoppers
Location: Seen at Chennai South India
August 11, 2017 10:09 am
Help me to identify the variety of the colour grasshopper.
Signature: SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Dear SUNDAR,
Based on its bright coloration, we suspected correctly that this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but ascertaining the species identity took longer than expected because the nymph differs in coloration from the adult.  This is an immature Painted Grasshopper,
Poekilocerus pictus, which we identified thanks to this FlickR posting.  We verified its identity on Jungle Dragon where it states:  “‘Poekilocerus pictus‘ is a large brightly colored grasshopper from India. Nymphs of the species are notorious for squirting a jet of liquid up to several inches away when grasped.”  We also located this Blog we cannot read, but that you might find interesting.

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for your clarification on my query.  It’s very much interesting.
Thanks a lot.
Regards SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of Grashopper from South Africa
Location: Mountains West og Krüger NP, SA
August 5, 2017 1:08 am
Dear Bugman
I travel the World for birding but are very hooked on insects as well and I encounter many weird bugs. This one is from an isolated strip of montane forest in South Africa. Looks interesting!
Hope You can help me on the ID
Ole Zoltan Göller, Denmark
Signature: Ole Zoltan Göller

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Ole,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and many individuals have bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators of their toxicity.  Based on this FlickR posting, we believe your amorous pair are
Phymateus (Maphyteus) leprosus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination