Currently viewing the category: "Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Locust/grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Rhodes Village, Eastern Cape South Africa
Date: 04/13/2021
Time: 06:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Well-camouflaged in our only indigenous tree in this area, the Ouhout, Leucosidea sericea
How you want your letter signed:  Russell

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Russell,
We apologize for the late response.  We have been without connectivity for a few days but now we are back.  It is interesting that your image is of such a well camouflaged Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper, because this family is known for aposomatic or warning coloration.  We are nearly positive your individual is
Phymateus leprosus, and according to iNaturalist, the common name is the Leprous Milkweed Locust.  Grasshoppers from this family often feed on milkweed and they are able make use of the toxic properties of milkweed which makes them unpleasant tasting or possibly toxic to some species.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need Wing Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa
Date: 04/14/2020
Time: 02:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these wings in my yard and i canot find anything on google please help
How you want your letter signed:  Please just email me thanks a lot

Wings of a Green Milkweed Locust

These are Grasshopper wings, and we are very confident they are the wings of a Green Milkweed LocustPhymateus viridipes.  As they are toxic to many animals and presumably unpalatable to others, we are curious what ate the body and left the wings behind.  Here is an image from FlickR and information on Wikipedia.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Phymateus leprosus?
Geographic location of the bug:  Kurisa Moya – Bush Forest Reserve – Tzaneen South-Africa
Date: 11/23/2019
Time: 05:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen this bug in the garden of our guesthouse of Kurisa Moya in the Woodbush Forest Reserve near Tzaneen in South Africa. It was about 15 cm long or more and looked as if it was not a real animal but was moving.
How you want your letter signed:  Bert Rodenburg

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Bert,
We agree that this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper, probably
Phymateus leprosus based on this Jungle Dragon image.

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Djibouti
Date: 11/12/2019
Time: 03:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this kind of grasshopper today near my workplace, any idea of her name ?
How you want your letter signed:  jodrak

Grasshopper

Dear jodrak,
We have a similar looking Grasshopper in our archives, also from Djibouti, but we have never been able to ascertain a species name.  We also located this unidentified Grasshopper on FlickR.  We believe this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  PAINTED GRASSHOPPER
Geographic location of the bug:  Jharkhand, Jamshedpur. INDIA
Date: 07/23/2019
Time: 05:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Today I see this painted grasshoppers near Dimna lake at Jamshedpur, India.
How you want your letter signed:  By email mail

Ak Grasshopper

The Ak Grasshopper from India, Poekilocerus pictus, is sometimes called a Painted Grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lubber grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Date: 01/04/2019
Time: 08:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there
Please help identify this grasshopper. My son and I found it hanging around on our front gate.
We have it contained in a small container with air holes and will release it after looking at it for a day or so.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurt Swart

Elegant Grasshopper

Dear Kurt,
This is one of the Gaudy Grasshoppers or Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, a family that includes many members with bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators about the foul taste or toxic properties if this Grasshopper is eaten.  Age Foto Stock has a nice image of a mating pair.  Previously, we identified this species as the Elegant Grasshopper,
Zonocerus elegans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination