Currently viewing the category: "Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  PAINTED GRASSHOPPER
Geographic location of the bug:  Jharkhand, Jamshedpur. INDIA
Date: 07/23/2019
Time: 05:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Today I see this painted grasshoppers near Dimna lake at Jamshedpur, India.
How you want your letter signed:  By email mail

Ak Grasshopper

The Ak Grasshopper from India, Poekilocerus pictus, is sometimes called a Painted Grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lubber grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Date: 01/04/2019
Time: 08:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there
Please help identify this grasshopper. My son and I found it hanging around on our front gate.
We have it contained in a small container with air holes and will release it after looking at it for a day or so.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurt Swart

Elegant Grasshopper

Dear Kurt,
This is one of the Gaudy Grasshoppers or Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, a family that includes many members with bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators about the foul taste or toxic properties if this Grasshopper is eaten.  Age Foto Stock has a nice image of a mating pair.  Previously, we identified this species as the Elegant Grasshopper,
Zonocerus elegans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Toxic milkweed cricket or not?
Geographic location of the bug:  KwaZulu Natal South Africa
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 12:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Confirmation it’s a Toxic milkweed cricket and is it a female (big one) and two males (smaller ones)
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Bill,
These are indeed mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae and we believe the species is
Phymateus leprosus.  Females are the larger individuals in the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful grasshopper/locust
Geographic location of the bug:  Maropeng, Cradle of Humankind Visitor Centre
Date: 10/13/2018
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
We have just returned to the UK from a fabulous holiday in South Africa, during which we saw the locust/grasshoppers shown in the attached photos.  Could you identify it please.  We were outside the lower exit of the Cradle of Humankind at Maropeng at about 15:30 on 22 October 2018.  It was warm (~32C) and dry.  Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  David Gittens

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear David,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, probably
Phymateus leprosus based on this iSpot image.  The colors are variable, but generally they are aposomatic, meaning they are warning colors, a survival strategy employed by many insects that feed on milkweed.

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for the ID and fascinating information.  Although I have a great interest in wildlife in general I know very little about this category of insect, let alone those from RSA.  I had discounted the Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper on its colouration even though I wondered if it might have been in a breeding ‘plumage’.
Thanks again
David
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Riyadh Saudi Arabia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 11:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, cane across this beetle and looking to ID it
It was around the length of an iPhone 5 if that helps
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Usher Hopper

Dear Email,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we have identified a previously submitted individual as an Usher Hopper,
Poekilocerus bufonius.  According to TrekNature:  “The distribution ranges from Syria to Egypt and NW Saudi Arabia. … The genus Poekilocerus belongs to the family of highly colorful species that can be found in tropical regions around the world. This animal announced its non-patability by a yellowish secretion. Its preferred food are Milkweed plants, and the animal seems to harbour some of the bitter ingredients of the plants in its hemolymph.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating bugs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Goromondzi, nr Harare, Zimbabwe
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 08:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Are these two bugs a male and female mating? The smaller one on the back looked similar to a grasshopper.  Found out in the bush. The larger one appeared to struggle to move with the other on its back.
How you want your letter signed:  P Mcleod

Mating Grasshoppers

Dear P Mcleod,
These are indeed Grasshoppers, and it is not unusual for the female to be significantly larger than the male in many species of Grasshoppers which is obvious during mating.  We believe your individuals are in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.

Wow. Thank you for such a quick response. I should have realised the larger one was a grasshopper but I have never seen one like it before.
Thank you again
Phyllida
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination