Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis patrolling my Woody Plant captures marauding Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  09/09/2017
Time:  10:37 AM EDT
Dear Bugman,
Last week I sent you pictures of the female California Mantis that is patrolling my Woody Plant.  Well, today I am happy to report that she is doing her job.  I found her eating this large green grasshopper.  I wish I could have seen the actual capture, but I didn’t arrive until after the Grasshopper had its head eaten away.  Much earlier in the summer, I removed some small green Grasshoppers that you identified as a Gray Bird Grasshopper, a funny name since it was green.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis eats Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
The prey in your image is indeed a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, and it is much larger than the individual in your submission from early July of a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph.  The reason these green nymphs are called Gray Bird Grasshoppers is because that is the color of the mature adult.  Nymphs feeding on fresh green leaves need to blend in or they will be eaten.  Your female California Mantis is beautifully camouflaged among the leaves of your plant, especially when she is downwardly hanging.

Thanks Bugman,
Do you have any further advice regarding caring for my guard insect?

Hi again Constant Gardener,
If a mature, mated California Mantis finds a safe plant where the hunting is good, she will remain there.  She will eventually produce and attach to woody stems, several oothecae, the egg cases that each contain dozens of eggs that will hatch into mantidlings in the spring.  When you harvest, keep a diligent eye peeled for the oothecae.  In our own garden, we tie the oothecae we discover while pruning in the fall and winter onto trees and shrubs where we would like to have predators that keep injurious species at bay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshoppers
Location: Seen at Chennai South India
August 11, 2017 10:09 am
Help me to identify the variety of the colour grasshopper.
Signature: SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Dear SUNDAR,
Based on its bright coloration, we suspected correctly that this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but ascertaining the species identity took longer than expected because the nymph differs in coloration from the adult.  This is an immature Painted Grasshopper,
Poekilocerus pictus, which we identified thanks to this FlickR posting.  We verified its identity on Jungle Dragon where it states:  “‘Poekilocerus pictus‘ is a large brightly colored grasshopper from India. Nymphs of the species are notorious for squirting a jet of liquid up to several inches away when grasped.”  We also located this Blog we cannot read, but that you might find interesting.

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for your clarification on my query.  It’s very much interesting.
Thanks a lot.
Regards SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of Grashopper from South Africa
Location: Mountains West og Krüger NP, SA
August 5, 2017 1:08 am
Dear Bugman
I travel the World for birding but are very hooked on insects as well and I encounter many weird bugs. This one is from an isolated strip of montane forest in South Africa. Looks interesting!
Hope You can help me on the ID
Ole Zoltan Göller, Denmark
Signature: Ole Zoltan Göller

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Ole,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and many individuals have bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators of their toxicity.  Based on this FlickR posting, we believe your amorous pair are
Phymateus (Maphyteus) leprosus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider on my Woody Plant
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 27, 2017 7:20 PM
Dear Bugman,
Several weeks ago, you identified a tiny Gray Bird Grasshopper for me.  I have noticed many chew marks on the plant’s leaves, and I noticed that the little guy has grown quite a bit, so I captured it and relocated it elsewhere in the garden.  At the same time I found this well camouflaged predator that I have learned is a Green Lynx Spider.  What can you tell me about this spider?  I’m presuming it will not harm my plant and I am letting it stay where I found it.
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Male Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
Because of your kindness to the young, hungry Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Your Green Lynx Spider is a male as evidenced by his pronounced pedipalps and long legs.  Male Green Lynx Spiders of breeding age will wander in search of a mate, and he will most likely move on as that is his primary goal.  If you had discovered a female on your “woody plant”  and if the hunting there was to her liking, she might remain and even raise her young, all while keeping unwanted insects from feeding on the plant.  You have quite a thriving ecosystem on your “woody plant”.

Immature Gray Bird Grasshopper, shortly before relocation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Will this Grasshopper eat my buds?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 19, 2017
Thanks Bugman, for identifying my young Gray Bird Grasshopper.  It is still living on my woody plant and it is growing larger, but now I am worried that it might eat the buds forming on my plant.  Do grasshoppers just eat leaves or will they eat other parts of the plants?
Signed:  Constant Gardener

Immature Gray Bird Grasshopper

Dear Constant Gardener,
According to BugGuide, the Gray Bird Grasshopper,
Schistocerca nitens, will eat “Apparently a wide variety of plants.”  We also looked at what BugGuide has to say about the genus and we learned:  “The locust of the biblical plagues (well-known and dreaded throughout the Middle East and Europe in ancient times) is the only Old World member of this genus, Schistocerca gregaria (Song, 2004). North American species are much less prone to swarming behavior.”  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “The light green nymphs attain noticeable size in late summer.  Both stages feed on various garden crops and ornamentals.”  We are relatively confident that a Grasshopper feeding on leaves may continue to eat if presented with buds.  If you are concerned about the flower production of this plant, as we stated in an earlier posting, you should consider relocating this young nymph.  Luckily you do not need to worry about a plague of locusts descending on your crops, but a large Gray Bird Grasshopper might noticeably affect your yield.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What grasshopper is this?
Location: Lake Naivasha, Kenya
July 18, 2017 10:37 pm
I found these black grasshoppers in Hell’s Gate Gorge near Lake Naivasha in Kenya in June 2017.
Signature: Martina

Grasshopper Nymphs

Dear Martina,
We did not have any luck locating any matching images online, but we suspect these black Grasshopper nymphs might be in the family Pyrgomorphidae, the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers.

Grasshopper Nymphs

Thanks Daniel,
That was my closest guess too.
Your website was very helpful in eliminating lots of possibilities, and in coming closer to a match.
Thanks so much too for the prompt response.
Best, Martina
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination