Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  St Johns County, FL
Date: 10/23/2018
Time: 01:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Spotted this extremely large colorful grasshopper in a local park. Would like to know exactly what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Michele

Eastern Lubber

Dear Michele,
This is an Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, a flightless species that often appears in great numbers.  Your individual is a light colored individual.  There is also a dark variation of the Eastern Lubber.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found in Seville
Geographic location of the bug:  Seville, Andalusia
Date: 10/22/2018
Time: 04:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this mighty bug flapping around in my office late one night. For reference my middle finger is a shade over 3.5 inches, so this rather sturdy grasshopper is close to 3 inches in length. I believed grasshoppers to prefer open plains to city centre life. I’ve certainly never seen one this large before.
How you want your letter signed:  Ben

Egyptian Grasshopper

Dear Ben,
We believe we have identified your Grasshopper as an Egyptian Grasshopper,
Anacridium aegyptum, thanks to The Insects of Southern Spain where it states:  “Egyptian Grasshoppers are sometimes mistaken for locusts, but the diagnostics for the former are the vertically striped eyes and the pronuptum, the shield type shape behind the head … is distinctly ridged, like plates of armour.”  Nightengale Trails has some nice images as does TrekNature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Toxic milkweed cricket or not?
Geographic location of the bug:  KwaZulu Natal South Africa
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 12:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Confirmation it’s a Toxic milkweed cricket and is it a female (big one) and two males (smaller ones)
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Bill,
These are indeed mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae and we believe the species is
Phymateus leprosus.  Females are the larger individuals in the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful grasshopper/locust
Geographic location of the bug:  Maropeng, Cradle of Humankind Visitor Centre
Date: 10/13/2018
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
We have just returned to the UK from a fabulous holiday in South Africa, during which we saw the locust/grasshoppers shown in the attached photos.  Could you identify it please.  We were outside the lower exit of the Cradle of Humankind at Maropeng at about 15:30 on 22 October 2018.  It was warm (~32C) and dry.  Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  David Gittens

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear David,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, probably
Phymateus leprosus based on this iSpot image.  The colors are variable, but generally they are aposomatic, meaning they are warning colors, a survival strategy employed by many insects that feed on milkweed.

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for the ID and fascinating information.  Although I have a great interest in wildlife in general I know very little about this category of insect, let alone those from RSA.  I had discounted the Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper on its colouration even though I wondered if it might have been in a breeding ‘plumage’.
Thanks again
David
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Conehead
Geographic location of the bug:  Jacksonville,  FL
Date: 10/05/2018
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn L

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Dawn,
Conehead was a good guess, but Coneheads are Katydids and you have submitted an image of a Grasshopper.  Katydids and Grasshoppers have many similarities as they are both classified in the order Orthoptera, but they have decidedly different antennae.  Your Grasshopper is a Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “This slender, elongate grasshopper has a very pointed head and flattened, sword-shaped antennae” and “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Riyadh Saudi Arabia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 11:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, cane across this beetle and looking to ID it
It was around the length of an iPhone 5 if that helps
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Usher Hopper

Dear Email,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we have identified a previously submitted individual as an Usher Hopper,
Poekilocerus bufonius.  According to TrekNature:  “The distribution ranges from Syria to Egypt and NW Saudi Arabia. … The genus Poekilocerus belongs to the family of highly colorful species that can be found in tropical regions around the world. This animal announced its non-patability by a yellowish secretion. Its preferred food are Milkweed plants, and the animal seems to harbour some of the bitter ingredients of the plants in its hemolymph.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination