Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Will this Grasshopper eat my buds?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 19, 2017
Thanks Bugman, for identifying my young Gray Bird Grasshopper.  It is still living on my woody plant and it is growing larger, but now I am worried that it might eat the buds forming on my plant.  Do grasshoppers just eat leaves or will they eat other parts of the plants?
Signed:  Constant Gardener

Immature Gray Bird Grasshopper

Dear Constant Gardener,
According to BugGuide, the Gray Bird Grasshopper,
Schistocerca nitens, will eat “Apparently a wide variety of plants.”  We also looked at what BugGuide has to say about the genus and we learned:  “The locust of the biblical plagues (well-known and dreaded throughout the Middle East and Europe in ancient times) is the only Old World member of this genus, Schistocerca gregaria (Song, 2004). North American species are much less prone to swarming behavior.”  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “The light green nymphs attain noticeable size in late summer.  Both stages feed on various garden crops and ornamentals.”  We are relatively confident that a Grasshopper feeding on leaves may continue to eat if presented with buds.  If you are concerned about the flower production of this plant, as we stated in an earlier posting, you should consider relocating this young nymph.  Luckily you do not need to worry about a plague of locusts descending on your crops, but a large Gray Bird Grasshopper might noticeably affect your yield.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What grasshopper is this?
Location: Lake Naivasha, Kenya
July 18, 2017 10:37 pm
I found these black grasshoppers in Hell’s Gate Gorge near Lake Naivasha in Kenya in June 2017.
Signature: Martina

Grasshopper Nymphs

Dear Martina,
We did not have any luck locating any matching images online, but we suspect these black Grasshopper nymphs might be in the family Pyrgomorphidae, the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers.

Grasshopper Nymphs

Thanks Daniel,
That was my closest guess too.
Your website was very helpful in eliminating lots of possibilities, and in coming closer to a match.
Thanks so much too for the prompt response.
Best, Martina
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket
Location: Uk Washington Tyne and Wear
July 13, 2017 2:40 am
Well I was leaving for work this morning when I came across a yellow and black cricket with red eyes it was very bizarre as I’ve never seen a cricket like that in my life and I Live in Britain so it looked very exotic for my region and I was asking could you help identify it.
Signature: Cricket

Immature Desert Locust

Dear Cricket,
We did not think this Grasshopper identification was going to present the identification challenge that it did.  The first matching image we found was on DK Findout, but alas, there was no identification except the category “crickets, locusts and grasshoppers.”  We then found an Alamy stock photo identified as African Desert Locust,
Schistocerca gregaria subadult.  Now that we had a name, we located BBC Nature where it states:  “The desert locust is one of about a dozen species of grasshoppers known as locusts which – unlike other grasshoppers – are able to change their behaviour in response to population density. This enables them to form swarms that can migrate over large distances. Locust swarms vary from less than one square kilometre to several hundred square kilometres. There can be from 40 million to as many as 80 million locust adults in each square kilometre of a swarm.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s Eating my Woody Plant?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
July 8, 2017 6:47 PM
I have several woody plants in my garden and I am very concerned with them being eaten by insects.  What is this on my plant?
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a very young Grasshopper nymph and considering your location, we suspect it is a hatchling Gray Bird Grasshopper.  Though this nymph is quite small, adult Gray Bird Grasshoppers get quite large, with a wingspan well over four inches.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon:  “Apparently a wide variety of plants” and “Apparently overwintering primarily as eggs, hatching over an extended season from spring to late summer (perhaps hatching is related to rainfall events?), and maturing from late spring till late summer or early autumn. Some adults overwinter, and perhaps nymphs too (?).”  There appears to be a notch chewed off the leaf upon which this little Grasshopper is resting, which is a good indication it is feeding off your “Woody Plant”.  Since Gray Bird Grasshoppers are not limited to a single plant species as food, you can probably safely relocate this individual if you are concerned about your “Woody Plant” being eaten.

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Facebook Comment from Jennifer
LOL…. all I see is pot! lol
oh wait… now I see it! lol

Facebook Comment from Michael
I know, they keep saying that. I’m like, damn, just grow some balls and say marijuana.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper Nymphs from South Africa
Location: Riebeek-Kasteel, Western Cape, South Africa
May 3, 2017 3:25 am
More Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper Nymphs from South Africa
May 2, 2017
We saw something similar last weekend (30.4.2017), hiking Kasteelberg in Riebeek Kasteel, Western Cape. They started appearing the further we got to the rocky top of the mountain.
As you mentioned, they change colour during maturation process – we took some pictures that look exactly like the one displayed above, but much brighter in colour. Is it the same species just ‘older’ as the colour is much brighter?
We also saw big ones in a dark red & black colour.
I’d love to add pictures to get more information – please contact me so I can send them perhaps?
Thanks & Cheers
Signature: Julia

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Julia,
Both of your images are of Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  The green nymph appears to be
Phymateus leprosus which we have featured on our site in the past.  Based on this iSpot image, the adult is also Phymateus leprosus.  This iSpot image provides verification that the nymph is the same species.  Browsing through all the species images on iSpot indicates there is some color variation in the adults and possibly the nymphs as well.

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Bakersfield, Ca
April 24, 2017 4:14 pm
What type of grasshopper is this??
Signature: with your name

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

We believe this is the nymph of a Gray Bird Grasshopper, Schitocerca nitens.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination