Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Toxic milkweed cricket or not?
Geographic location of the bug:  KwaZulu Natal South Africa
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 12:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Confirmation it’s a Toxic milkweed cricket and is it a female (big one) and two males (smaller ones)
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Bill,
These are indeed mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae and we believe the species is
Phymateus leprosus.  Females are the larger individuals in the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful grasshopper/locust
Geographic location of the bug:  Maropeng, Cradle of Humankind Visitor Centre
Date: 10/13/2018
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
We have just returned to the UK from a fabulous holiday in South Africa, during which we saw the locust/grasshoppers shown in the attached photos.  Could you identify it please.  We were outside the lower exit of the Cradle of Humankind at Maropeng at about 15:30 on 22 October 2018.  It was warm (~32C) and dry.  Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  David Gittens

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear David,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, probably
Phymateus leprosus based on this iSpot image.  The colors are variable, but generally they are aposomatic, meaning they are warning colors, a survival strategy employed by many insects that feed on milkweed.

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for the ID and fascinating information.  Although I have a great interest in wildlife in general I know very little about this category of insect, let alone those from RSA.  I had discounted the Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper on its colouration even though I wondered if it might have been in a breeding ‘plumage’.
Thanks again
David
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Conehead
Geographic location of the bug:  Jacksonville,  FL
Date: 10/05/2018
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn L

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Dawn,
Conehead was a good guess, but Coneheads are Katydids and you have submitted an image of a Grasshopper.  Katydids and Grasshoppers have many similarities as they are both classified in the order Orthoptera, but they have decidedly different antennae.  Your Grasshopper is a Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “This slender, elongate grasshopper has a very pointed head and flattened, sword-shaped antennae” and “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Riyadh Saudi Arabia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 11:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, cane across this beetle and looking to ID it
It was around the length of an iPhone 5 if that helps
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Usher Hopper

Dear Email,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we have identified a previously submitted individual as an Usher Hopper,
Poekilocerus bufonius.  According to TrekNature:  “The distribution ranges from Syria to Egypt and NW Saudi Arabia. … The genus Poekilocerus belongs to the family of highly colorful species that can be found in tropical regions around the world. This animal announced its non-patability by a yellowish secretion. Its preferred food are Milkweed plants, and the animal seems to harbour some of the bitter ingredients of the plants in its hemolymph.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metamorphosis of a Gray Bird Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/15/2018
Time: 03:30 PM PDT
Daniel glanced at the carrot seeds that are ready to plant and noticed something unusual from a distance.  The backlighting on the wings of this newly metamorphosed Gray Bird Grasshopper caught the light beautifully.  Sure enough, the cast off exuvia was at the base of the plant.  The next day, after its wings had fully hardened, it was gone.

Metamorphosis of a Gray Bird Grasshopper

Exuvia of a Gray Bird Grasshopper

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orgy on my Lemon Haze plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/05/2018
Time: 8:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Shortly after writing that the predators are controlling my little Grasshoppers, I witnessed this lurid behavior.  When I tried to get a better camera angle, they flew off.  There was a mating pair of Grasshoppers and a second male was watching from the sidelines.  Was he a voyeur or was he waiting his turn?
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Mating Gray Bird Grasshoppers

Dear Constant Gardener,
We really don’t believe insects engage in voyeuristic behavior, nor do we believe Grasshoppers take turns.  We suspect this mature female Gray Bird Grasshopper,
Schistocerca nitens, released pheromones that attracted both males and either the one who arrived first or the more aggressive male got the prize.  We would have loved to have seen an image of the pair flying off in flagrante delicto.  We hope your crop is not decimated by Locusts because according to BugGuide:  “Apparently overwintering primarily as eggs, hatching over an extended season from spring to late summer (perhaps hatching is related to rainfall events?), and maturing from late spring till late summer or early autumn. Some adults overwinter, and perhaps nymphs too (?). It is possible that southward there are two broods, but this is not clear. In tropical regions south of the U.S., and perhaps in southernmost Texas and coastal California, all stages can be found at most any time of year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination