Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper on a mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Korean field of Tanchon river
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 06:27 AM EDT
Me and my Indian friend, Priyam were strolling for an walk when we saw a grasshopper on a mantis. No kidding, the mantis did’nt even bother to take the grasshopper of. We gently held it. Nor the grasshopper or the mantis tried to escape. What were these bugs doing??
How you want your letter signed:  By email

Mantis and Grasshopper

We believe this is most likely a chance encounter.  Mantids are well camouflaged among twigs and Grasshoppers rest on twigs.  This is a fascinating image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  tiny grasshopper – with enormously long antennae
Geographic location of the bug:  Sabah, Borneo
Date: 10/18/2017
Time: 10:08 PM EDT
Hello again!
Flush with the near success of the recent giant cricket photos, I thought I’d try the other extreme. This tiny guy joined me for tea one afternoon on the Kinabatangan River. I thought at first it must be an early instar (?) but the length of the antennae make me think otherwise. Cool little critter whatever.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Paul Prior

Orthopteran

Dear Paul,
This really does look like a Grasshopper, a member of the Orthopteran suborder Caleifera, a group sometimes called the Short-Horned Orthoptera according to BugGuide, because they have short antennae, however, there is at least one family in the suborder, Tanaoceridae, the Desert Long-Horned Grasshoppers, that is pictured on BugGuide that does have long antennae.  Though BugGuide is a site devoted to North American species, there might be Long-Horned Grasshoppers in Borneo as well.  Most Orthopterans with long antennae, including Katydids and Crickets, belong to the suborder Ensifera, the Long-Horned Orthopterans.  Based on this FlickR image, Borneo does have some Grasshoppers with long antennae.  This is a young nymph, and it might be difficult to identify properly, but we will check with Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide any information.   

Orthopteran

Much appreciated, Daniel.
I’ll follow up on the leads you’ve provided. I’m not an entomologist at all so my belief that no youngster could possess such ridiculously long antennae was based simply on layman’s expectations. I fear that since it’s therefore an early instar it may be unidentifiable!
Many thanks,
Paul

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:41 PM EDT
We photographed these as part of a large swarm on the dry steppe at Rio Capitan in southern Argentine Patagonia in December. They seem to be flightless. Any idea which species?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Mating Grasshoppers

Hi again Martin,
One more time you have provided us with some gorgeous images of unusual Patagonian Grasshoppers that we cannot identify for you.  We have posted all your images and we hope we can eventually provide you with an identification.

Grasshopper

Update:  Identification courtesy of Cesar Crash
Cesar Crash of Insetologia  has been kind enough to provide a comment with a link to an image of a member of the genus
Bufonacris that looks like a matching identification to us.

Many thanks Daniel & Cesar.
It looks pretty close. The two locations are about 800km apart, but the steppe habitat is very similar.
Martin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flightless Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:31 PM EDT
On the high windy mountains and mountain slopes of Argentine Patagonia we often find these large chunky flightless grasshoppers. They often occur in cold areas. Any idea what genus/species they might be?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Grasshopper

Hi Martin,
Just as in your previous submission, we have located a matching image, this time on Alamy, but again, there is no family, genus or species identification.  These Grasshoppers remind us of North American Toad Lubbers in the genus
Phrynotettix pictured on BugGuide and they might be closely related.  Alas, there is not a good database of Argentine Grasshoppers that we are able to locate online.

Grasshopper

Hi Daniel,
Many thanks.
Looking on the web, could these be Elasmoderus sp.?

Hi Martin,
We wish you had provided a link regarding the genus.  We found an image on Atacama Insects, and though similar looking, we don’t think they look like the same species.  Because of the remoteness of the location, there might not be much documentation on the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating Patagonian Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
This happy couple were photographed at the Upsala Glacier in the far south of Argentine Patagonia in December. Any idea what species?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Mating Flightless Grasshoppers

Dear Martin,
Your image of mating flightless Grasshoppers is gorgeous, and it is shot from the perfect angle to illustrate the activity.  We found a matching image on TravelBlog, but it is only identified as a Giant Flightless Alpine Grasshopper.  We will have to post this as unidentified and get back to it later.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis patrolling my Woody Plant captures marauding Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  09/09/2017
Time:  10:37 AM EDT
Dear Bugman,
Last week I sent you pictures of the female California Mantis that is patrolling my Woody Plant.  Well, today I am happy to report that she is doing her job.  I found her eating this large green grasshopper.  I wish I could have seen the actual capture, but I didn’t arrive until after the Grasshopper had its head eaten away.  Much earlier in the summer, I removed some small green Grasshoppers that you identified as a Gray Bird Grasshopper, a funny name since it was green.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis eats Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
The prey in your image is indeed a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, and it is much larger than the individual in your submission from early July of a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph.  The reason these green nymphs are called Gray Bird Grasshoppers is because that is the color of the mature adult.  Nymphs feeding on fresh green leaves need to blend in or they will be eaten.  Your female California Mantis is beautifully camouflaged among the leaves of your plant, especially when she is downwardly hanging.

Thanks Bugman,
Do you have any further advice regarding caring for my guard insect?

Hi again Constant Gardener,
If a mature, mated California Mantis finds a safe plant where the hunting is good, she will remain there.  She will eventually produce and attach to woody stems, several oothecae, the egg cases that each contain dozens of eggs that will hatch into mantidlings in the spring.  When you harvest, keep a diligent eye peeled for the oothecae.  In our own garden, we tie the oothecae we discover while pruning in the fall and winter onto trees and shrubs where we would like to have predators that keep injurious species at bay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination