Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Swarming Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:41 PM EDT
We photographed these as part of a large swarm on the dry steppe at Rio Capitan in southern Argentine Patagonia in December. They seem to be flightless. Any idea which species?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Mating Grasshoppers

Hi again Martin,
One more time you have provided us with some gorgeous images of unusual Patagonian Grasshoppers that we cannot identify for you.  We have posted all your images and we hope we can eventually provide you with an identification.

Grasshopper

Update:  Identification courtesy of Cesar Crash
Cesar Crash of Insetologia  has been kind enough to provide a comment with a link to an image of a member of the genus
Bufonacris that looks like a matching identification to us.

Many thanks Daniel & Cesar.
It looks pretty close. The two locations are about 800km apart, but the steppe habitat is very similar.
Martin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flightless Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:31 PM EDT
On the high windy mountains and mountain slopes of Argentine Patagonia we often find these large chunky flightless grasshoppers. They often occur in cold areas. Any idea what genus/species they might be?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Grasshopper

Hi Martin,
Just as in your previous submission, we have located a matching image, this time on Alamy, but again, there is no family, genus or species identification.  These Grasshoppers remind us of North American Toad Lubbers in the genus
Phrynotettix pictured on BugGuide and they might be closely related.  Alas, there is not a good database of Argentine Grasshoppers that we are able to locate online.

Grasshopper

Hi Daniel,
Many thanks.
Looking on the web, could these be Elasmoderus sp.?

Hi Martin,
We wish you had provided a link regarding the genus.  We found an image on Atacama Insects, and though similar looking, we don’t think they look like the same species.  Because of the remoteness of the location, there might not be much documentation on the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating Patagonian Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
This happy couple were photographed at the Upsala Glacier in the far south of Argentine Patagonia in December. Any idea what species?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Mating Flightless Grasshoppers

Dear Martin,
Your image of mating flightless Grasshoppers is gorgeous, and it is shot from the perfect angle to illustrate the activity.  We found a matching image on TravelBlog, but it is only identified as a Giant Flightless Alpine Grasshopper.  We will have to post this as unidentified and get back to it later.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis patrolling my Woody Plant captures marauding Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  09/09/2017
Time:  10:37 AM EDT
Dear Bugman,
Last week I sent you pictures of the female California Mantis that is patrolling my Woody Plant.  Well, today I am happy to report that she is doing her job.  I found her eating this large green grasshopper.  I wish I could have seen the actual capture, but I didn’t arrive until after the Grasshopper had its head eaten away.  Much earlier in the summer, I removed some small green Grasshoppers that you identified as a Gray Bird Grasshopper, a funny name since it was green.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis eats Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
The prey in your image is indeed a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, and it is much larger than the individual in your submission from early July of a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph.  The reason these green nymphs are called Gray Bird Grasshoppers is because that is the color of the mature adult.  Nymphs feeding on fresh green leaves need to blend in or they will be eaten.  Your female California Mantis is beautifully camouflaged among the leaves of your plant, especially when she is downwardly hanging.

Thanks Bugman,
Do you have any further advice regarding caring for my guard insect?

Hi again Constant Gardener,
If a mature, mated California Mantis finds a safe plant where the hunting is good, she will remain there.  She will eventually produce and attach to woody stems, several oothecae, the egg cases that each contain dozens of eggs that will hatch into mantidlings in the spring.  When you harvest, keep a diligent eye peeled for the oothecae.  In our own garden, we tie the oothecae we discover while pruning in the fall and winter onto trees and shrubs where we would like to have predators that keep injurious species at bay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshoppers
Location: Seen at Chennai South India
August 11, 2017 10:09 am
Help me to identify the variety of the colour grasshopper.
Signature: SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Dear SUNDAR,
Based on its bright coloration, we suspected correctly that this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but ascertaining the species identity took longer than expected because the nymph differs in coloration from the adult.  This is an immature Painted Grasshopper,
Poekilocerus pictus, which we identified thanks to this FlickR posting.  We verified its identity on Jungle Dragon where it states:  “‘Poekilocerus pictus‘ is a large brightly colored grasshopper from India. Nymphs of the species are notorious for squirting a jet of liquid up to several inches away when grasped.”  We also located this Blog we cannot read, but that you might find interesting.

Immature Painted Grasshopper

Hi Daniel
Many thanks for your clarification on my query.  It’s very much interesting.
Thanks a lot.
Regards SUNDAR RAGHURAMAN

Immature Painted Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of Grashopper from South Africa
Location: Mountains West og Krüger NP, SA
August 5, 2017 1:08 am
Dear Bugman
I travel the World for birding but are very hooked on insects as well and I encounter many weird bugs. This one is from an isolated strip of montane forest in South Africa. Looks interesting!
Hope You can help me on the ID
Ole Zoltan Göller, Denmark
Signature: Ole Zoltan Göller

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Ole,
These are mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and many individuals have bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators of their toxicity.  Based on this FlickR posting, we believe your amorous pair are
Phymateus (Maphyteus) leprosus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination