Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Napier Western Cape SA
Date: 02/20/2019
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please can you ID this fella, have tried various other sites and nobody is sure….thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Don’t mind.

Grasshopper Nymph

This is definitely a Grasshopper in the family Acrididae, and it is an immature nymph.  We will attempt to provide you with a species identification.

Grasshopper Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lubber grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Date: 01/04/2019
Time: 08:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there
Please help identify this grasshopper. My son and I found it hanging around on our front gate.
We have it contained in a small container with air holes and will release it after looking at it for a day or so.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurt Swart

Elegant Grasshopper

Dear Kurt,
This is one of the Gaudy Grasshoppers or Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, a family that includes many members with bright aposomatic coloration to warn predators about the foul taste or toxic properties if this Grasshopper is eaten.  Age Foto Stock has a nice image of a mating pair.  Previously, we identified this species as the Elegant Grasshopper,
Zonocerus elegans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Monteverde Rain Forest, Monteverde, Costa Rica
Date: 12/19/2018
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please identify these insects
How you want your letter signed:  7Song

Grasshopper Nymphs

Dear 7Song,
These are immature Grasshoppers and immature individuals often look very different from adults, and there is often.  We will make an effort to provide you with an actual species identification.

Thank you Daniel
I figured they were juveniles but still couldn’t find their species. Thank you for any help you give with this and for your help with bug identification in general.
~7Song

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  St Johns County, FL
Date: 10/23/2018
Time: 01:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Spotted this extremely large colorful grasshopper in a local park. Would like to know exactly what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Michele

Eastern Lubber

Dear Michele,
This is an Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, a flightless species that often appears in great numbers.  Your individual is a light colored individual.  There is also a dark variation of the Eastern Lubber.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found in Seville
Geographic location of the bug:  Seville, Andalusia
Date: 10/22/2018
Time: 04:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this mighty bug flapping around in my office late one night. For reference my middle finger is a shade over 3.5 inches, so this rather sturdy grasshopper is close to 3 inches in length. I believed grasshoppers to prefer open plains to city centre life. I’ve certainly never seen one this large before.
How you want your letter signed:  Ben

Egyptian Grasshopper

Dear Ben,
We believe we have identified your Grasshopper as an Egyptian Grasshopper,
Anacridium aegyptum, thanks to The Insects of Southern Spain where it states:  “Egyptian Grasshoppers are sometimes mistaken for locusts, but the diagnostics for the former are the vertically striped eyes and the pronuptum, the shield type shape behind the head … is distinctly ridged, like plates of armour.”  Nightengale Trails has some nice images as does TrekNature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Toxic milkweed cricket or not?
Geographic location of the bug:  KwaZulu Natal South Africa
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 12:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Confirmation it’s a Toxic milkweed cricket and is it a female (big one) and two males (smaller ones)
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Bill,
These are indeed mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae and we believe the species is
Phymateus leprosus.  Females are the larger individuals in the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination