Currently viewing the category: "Tachinid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mother & babies or mass parasitism?
Location: Altadena CA foothills (chaparral)
June 18, 2017 7:08 pm
We have no idea what’s happening here… I strongly suspect parasitism?? Forwarding the photo to What’s That Bug for consultation!
Signature: Lori & Neighbors in Altadena

Caterpillar and Parasitoid

Dear Lori and Neighbors in Altadena,
This Caterpillar is definitely the victim of a Parasitoid.  Alas, we don’t think we will be able to accurately identify either species.  The Caterpillar appears to be an Inchworm in the family Geometridae, but we would need to see the prolegs to know for certain.  We suspect the parasitoid may be a species of Tachinid Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bee faced fly
Location: Nashville, TN
May 11, 2017 12:25 pm
Hello!
My mother and I were sitting on our front porch and noticed this insect flying around. It landed a few times and stayed still for a good length of time each time without moving so I got a few decent pics. It’s furry and black and has what looks like the face of a bee. Every year I feel like I see an insect that I’ve never seen before. This is the one for this year so far:
Signature: Any info would be appreciated, Nora

Tachinid Fly

Dear Nora,
This is some species of Tachinid Fly, and members of its family are all beneficial predators that parasitize a variety of host creatures that helps in population control.  Sometimes a species of Tachinid Fly is the only known predator of a significant agricultural pest species.  This BugGuide image is similar to the image you provided, though we cannot confirm that they are the same genus or species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting fly
Location: Northern Utah, Rocky Mountains, in a valley about half an hour away from The Salt Lake, and 10 minutes from a river, and 15 minutes from a reservoir that feeds the river
April 12, 2017 6:54 pm
This fly visited me early spring In Northern Utah. Physiologically, it looks nearly identical to a common housefly, with the same skittishness and “mouthing” behavior. The mouth was narrower but roughly the same shape as that of a housefly. It is slightly smaller than a housefly. My guess is a mutation, but insects are not my feild. Thank you for your time.
Signature: Digitally

Probably Tachinid Fly

Dear Digitally,
We believe this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we do not recognize the species.  According to BugGuide:  “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area and >10,000 spp. in ~1600 genera worldwide; it is possible that only half of the species have been described.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think it is a fly
Location: Uruguay
December 5, 2016 10:37 am
Greeting, last year I sent in a request and you were very helpful in identifying a bug for me, thank you for that!
On my walk this morning I saw what I thought were a few sick-looking bees so I snapped some photos. Looking at the pictures when I got inside however they look more fly-like to my untrained eye. Either way their bodies appear swollen and weird.
The only specimens I have seen are on these plants that attract mostly flies, bees, wasps, hornets, and beetles. It is mid-spring now and I have just noticed them for the 1st time this morning. The pictures attached are front, back, and top-down respectively. Thanks!
Signature: Louis

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Louis,
You are correct that this is a Fly.  More specifically, it is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a family whose members are parasitic.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Thanks again! You guys really know your stuff.
Louis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny and pretty fly
Location: Wildwood picnic area, Angeles National Forest
August 25, 2016 10:37 pm
This cute little thing I found in Angeles Forest today. I am stumped as to what it is. It was very small. Is it a Pokemon?
Signature: Jessica Chortkoff

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Dear Jessica,
We believe this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we cannot find any matching images on BugGuide, though we have to admit, we just browsed.  We will try to get a second opinion.

Eric Eaton writes back.
Daniel:
I did find it on Bugguide using the advanced search for Tachinidae in California….
Vanderwulpia atrophopodoides
http://bugguide.net/node/view/773788
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee?
Location: Mogollon Rim near Payson AZ
July 31, 2016 11:03 am
Good Morning!
I found this colorful insect on a flower in the Tonto National Forest in Eastern Arizona July 30, 2016.
We were hiking along the Mogollon rim at an elevation of 5,000 feet.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Ann in Arizona

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Ann,
This Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae might be
Macromya crocata based on this BugGuide image, though there are many other members of the family that look quite similar.  Another possibility is that this might be Adejeania vexatrix which according to BugGuide:  “Bristles concentrated in rings adjacent to the joints between abdominal segments. In the strikingly similar Hystricia abrupta, the bristles are scattered across the surface of the abdomen.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination