Currently viewing the category: "Tachinid Flies"
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Subject: I think it is a fly
Location: Uruguay
December 5, 2016 10:37 am
Greeting, last year I sent in a request and you were very helpful in identifying a bug for me, thank you for that!
On my walk this morning I saw what I thought were a few sick-looking bees so I snapped some photos. Looking at the pictures when I got inside however they look more fly-like to my untrained eye. Either way their bodies appear swollen and weird.
The only specimens I have seen are on these plants that attract mostly flies, bees, wasps, hornets, and beetles. It is mid-spring now and I have just noticed them for the 1st time this morning. The pictures attached are front, back, and top-down respectively. Thanks!
Signature: Louis

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Louis,
You are correct that this is a Fly.  More specifically, it is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a family whose members are parasitic.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Thanks again! You guys really know your stuff.
Louis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny and pretty fly
Location: Wildwood picnic area, Angeles National Forest
August 25, 2016 10:37 pm
This cute little thing I found in Angeles Forest today. I am stumped as to what it is. It was very small. Is it a Pokemon?
Signature: Jessica Chortkoff

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Dear Jessica,
We believe this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we cannot find any matching images on BugGuide, though we have to admit, we just browsed.  We will try to get a second opinion.

Eric Eaton writes back.
Daniel:
I did find it on Bugguide using the advanced search for Tachinidae in California….
Vanderwulpia atrophopodoides
http://bugguide.net/node/view/773788
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee?
Location: Mogollon Rim near Payson AZ
July 31, 2016 11:03 am
Good Morning!
I found this colorful insect on a flower in the Tonto National Forest in Eastern Arizona July 30, 2016.
We were hiking along the Mogollon rim at an elevation of 5,000 feet.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Ann in Arizona

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Ann,
This Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae might be
Macromya crocata based on this BugGuide image, though there are many other members of the family that look quite similar.  Another possibility is that this might be Adejeania vexatrix which according to BugGuide:  “Bristles concentrated in rings adjacent to the joints between abdominal segments. In the strikingly similar Hystricia abrupta, the bristles are scattered across the surface of the abdomen.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of bug is this?
Location: South Africa
July 10, 2016 10:46 am
Please can you identify what bug this is?
Kind regards
Signature: Cherise Walker

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Cherise,
This is a Bristle Fly or Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a group of parasitoid species that prey upon a variety of creatures.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally.”  This individual on iSpot looks similar to your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is going on – two photos?
Location: Essex, UK
August 31, 2015 10:38 am
I photographed these at Thameside Nature Park on 30 August.
The fly appears to be sitting on a nest apparently containing tiny youngsters – and with a trapdoor at the end. Has the fly been caught and left as food for the youngsters? Is it eating them itself?
These is also this strange red thing which appears to be spinning itself a cacoon.
Signature: Karenina

Tachinid Fly Emerges from Puparium

Tachinid Fly Emerges from Puparium

Dear Karenina,
We believe this is a Tachinid Fly, a parasitoid, and we believe your image might have something to do with the adult Tachinid Fly emerging from its host insect.  The other image might have something to do with fungus.  This is all conjecture and we eagerly welcome any additional information.

Possibly a Fungus

Possibly a Fungus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you please name my bug
Location: Mandurah Western Australia
July 28, 2015 1:25 pm
Can you please identify this little fly
Thank you Tracey Marinkovic
Signature: Just a name

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

Dear Tracey,
We are more than prepared to supply you with a response, and we hope you respond to our questions as well.  This looks very much like a Bristle Fly,
Amphibolia vidua, a species in the family Tachinidae from Australia that has caused a bit of confusion on our site in the past.  According to the head of Entomology of Csiro regarding a previous posting:  “Its larvae feed as a parasite internally on other insects.  On sunny days in summer the adults often rest on smooth eucalypt tree trunks, and similar structures such as poles and pipes.”  We also know that adult Tachinid Flies frequently visit flowers.  We are very curious for you to explain why you titled your images “snail parasite” and we hope you can provide us with an explanation. 

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

The only reason my bug had Snail Parasite written on it was I seen the pic of one on the Internet and thought it looked like one. I was just guessing cheers and thank you

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination