Currently viewing the category: "Tachinid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis in SE Michigan
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Michigan
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These (2) are in my yard.  The immediate area is a vernal marsh area, with swamp milkweed.  They are not on the milkweed, but it is close by.
How you want your letter signed:  Bill Jones

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis

Dear Bill,
Physically, this appears to be a Monarch chrysalis, however the color is not normal.  A normal Monarch chrysalis is bright green with gold flecks, and as it nears the time for the adult to emerge, the orange wings appears through the exoskeleton.  Your chrysalis appears to have fallen prey to a parasite, probably a Tachinid Fly like the chrysalis pictured on Monarch Lover

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather-legged Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  In addition to the colorful T. pennipes, I had this larger feather-legged fly in my mountain mint patch today.  My best guess is that it is T.  lanipes.  It was quite large and had the most beautiful wings. It’s under-belly was an orange-red color, which was kind of a surprise.   Did I land on the right id?
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah Bifulco

Feather-Legged Fly

Hi Deborah,
The last time you submitted images of a Feather Legged Fly, we originally thought it was
Trichopoda pennipes, but upon further contemplation, we believe it was Trichopoda lanipes.  We agree with you that this is also most likely Trichopoda lanipes.  We especially like that there is a Metallic Sweat Bee in the bottom of one of your images.

Feather-Legged Fly

Feather-Legged Fly and Metallic Sweat Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  fly wings be body
Geographic location of the bug:  Shade Gap, Pa
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 04:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I always pay attention to the insect world and the pictures I have I will send to you hoping you know. I have lived in the mountains for a long time and the bug I am seeing on flowers has fly wings but a bee body. This is the first year I am seeing these
How you want your letter signed:  Eric J Mazzi

Black Tachinid Flies on Goldenrod

Dear Eric,
This turned out to be a very easy identification for us.  We had a general ID upon looking at your image of parasitoid Tachinid Flies, a group of insects that are important pollinators as adults, and with larvae that parasitize various groups of insects and arthropods.  Tachinid Flies are very host specific.  Some species will only prey upon caterpillars from a single family, genus or even species, while others are just as picky about preying upon Spiders.  We quickly identified your Black Tachinid Flies as members of the genus
Leschenaultia thanks to this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide:  “recorded hosts include various Arctiidae, Malacosoma (Lasiocampidae), Hemileuca (Saturniidae), and some other moths.”  Your image is also the first we have posted this year of goldenrod, so we are tagging it as a Goldenrod Meadow posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unusually large fly
Geographic location of the bug:  South Wales
Date: 07/25/2018
Time: 09:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, a very unusually large fly came into my kitchen which I have trapped in a vase alongside a British pound coin to give perspective.   I live in a rural location, about 900feet above sea level, there are sheep, cows and horses roaming nearby and it’s an unusually hot summer.  Are you able to let me know what this is please?
How you want your letter signed:  Kathryn

Tachinid Fly: Tachinia grossa

Dear Kathryn,
This is a beneficial, parasitoid Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a very large and diverse family, and it appears to have a lighter, yellow head, which causes us to believe it is
Tachinia grossa.  See Diptera Info for an image of that species.  Parasitoid insects lay eggs on or near other insects, arthropods, and occasionally other creatures, and when the larvae hatch, they feed on the host.  Many Tachinid Flies prey upon caterpillars, and NBN Atlas includes a list of known caterpillars preyed upon by Tachinia grossa, including the Oak Egger or Lasiocampa quercus, the Gypsy Moth or Lymantria dispar and Hemaris fuciformis, a diurnal Hawkmoth.

Tachinid Fly: Tachinia grossa

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified fly
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 08:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on my door in spring. Never seen one before.
How you want your letter signed:  Charlotte

Tachinid Fly

Dear Charlotte,
Our best guess upon first viewing your image is that this might be a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, but we could not conclusively find any matching images on BugGuide.  It also somewhat resembles this Root Maggot Fly in the family Anthomyiidae pictured on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will be able to assist with this identification.

Update:  April 21, 2018
Thanks so much to Cesar Crash of Insetologia who provided us a link to the Tachinid Fly
 Cholomyia inaequipes that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females seen on flowers, perhaps (?) taking nectar” and “Parasitoid of weevils (Conotrachelus). Males, at least, come to lights.”  We believe the submitted image is of a male and since it was found on a door handle, it might have been attracted by the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange beefly
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Helen
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 01:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, I had just got home and went to check the letter box when I saw this fly sitting on it. But it wasn’t just any fly! It had a strange pattern, opposite to a wasp’s and it had oval eyes, it also had a strange antenna that split into two at the end, it’s wings were a strange shape and were covered with orange and black fur. It had no stinger bus was similar in colours to a bee. And also it’s legs were slim but it’s body was wider. It didn’t move no matter how close I put my camera, which is ver strange. I’ve never seen a fly with thick fur, let alone an orange a black one! Please help me discover what this strange insect is, but also, it could be new!
How you want your letter signed:  From Bethany

Tachinid Fly

Dear Bethany,
We are presuming you are from Mount Helen, Montana.  We are feeling confident that this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we have not had any luck identifying it to the genus or species level.  According to BugGuide:  “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area.”

Tachinid Fly

Actually I’m in Mt Helen, Victoria. Is it possible that the fly is a new species?

Dear Bethany,
Thanks for getting back to us, clarifying the original vague location information you provided for us.  Now that we have established your actual location, we have located this image on Diptera Info that is identified as ” Tachinidae –
Microtropesa sp. from western Australia.”  We have another member of the genus Microtropesa among the postings in our archives.  The genus is well represented on Atlas of Living Australia.

Thank you for the clarification, it looks a lot like what I saw

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination