Currently viewing the category: "Tachinid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified fly
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 08:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on my door in spring. Never seen one before.
How you want your letter signed:  Charlotte

Tachinid Fly

Dear Charlotte,
Our best guess upon first viewing your image is that this might be a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, but we could not conclusively find any matching images on BugGuide.  It also somewhat resembles this Root Maggot Fly in the family Anthomyiidae pictured on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will be able to assist with this identification.

Update:  April 21, 2018
Thanks so much to Cesar Crash of Insetologia who provided us a link to the Tachinid Fly
 Cholomyia inaequipes that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females seen on flowers, perhaps (?) taking nectar” and “Parasitoid of weevils (Conotrachelus). Males, at least, come to lights.”  We believe the submitted image is of a male and since it was found on a door handle, it might have been attracted by the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange beefly
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Helen
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 01:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, I had just got home and went to check the letter box when I saw this fly sitting on it. But it wasn’t just any fly! It had a strange pattern, opposite to a wasp’s and it had oval eyes, it also had a strange antenna that split into two at the end, it’s wings were a strange shape and were covered with orange and black fur. It had no stinger bus was similar in colours to a bee. And also it’s legs were slim but it’s body was wider. It didn’t move no matter how close I put my camera, which is ver strange. I’ve never seen a fly with thick fur, let alone an orange a black one! Please help me discover what this strange insect is, but also, it could be new!
How you want your letter signed:  From Bethany

Tachinid Fly

Dear Bethany,
We are presuming you are from Mount Helen, Montana.  We are feeling confident that this is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly, but we have not had any luck identifying it to the genus or species level.  According to BugGuide:  “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area.”

Tachinid Fly

Actually I’m in Mt Helen, Victoria. Is it possible that the fly is a new species?

Dear Bethany,
Thanks for getting back to us, clarifying the original vague location information you provided for us.  Now that we have established your actual location, we have located this image on Diptera Info that is identified as ” Tachinidae –
Microtropesa sp. from western Australia.”  We have another member of the genus Microtropesa among the postings in our archives.  The genus is well represented on Atlas of Living Australia.

Thank you for the clarification, it looks a lot like what I saw

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this? A horsefly? A bee? Or a hybrid maybe?
Geographic location of the bug:  Huntsville, Texas
Date: 11/24/2017
Time: 05:30 PM EDT
Hi. I found this at Sam Houston State University to be more specific. I’m not sure if it’s a bee or a fly, or even a new species. I’m in Forensics and our class needs to catch 20 bugs so that’s why it’s in two ziploc baggies. I was afraid it might bite or sting me through one bag. It looks sort of mean. While I don’t need to know, it would be cool if I knew what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Sadie

Tachinid Fly

Dear Sadie,
Normally we do not feel compelled to provide identifications for class projects, but something about your request resonated with us.  This is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, and this is a very large family with many similar looking species.  We believe based on images posted to the Flies of Goodwell and Texhoma, Texas Co. OK site that it is in the tribe Blondeliini.  BugGuide has four pages of genera in that tribe, so a more specific identification might require an expert in the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee-fly??
Geographic location of the bug:  Sanbernardino National Forest – southern California
Date: 11/09/2017
Time: 09:39 AM EDT
What the heck is this?? Lol
Found in Southern California on a rabbit brush bush.. feeding on the blossoms.  Nov 8, 2017
How you want your letter signed:  Sandy

Tachinid Fly

Dear Sandy,
This is not a Bee Fly.  It is a member of the family Tachinidae, and the only common name for members of the family is Tachinid Fly.  According to BugGuide, it is the “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area(1) and >10,000 spp. in ~1600 genera worldwide; it is possible that only half of the species have been described.”  There are many genera that look similar, and the same with species, so we don’t believe we will be able to provide you with an exact species name, but it might be
Paradejeania rutilioides which is pictured on BugGuide.  There is a similar looking individual not identified beyond the family posted on the Natural History of Orange County site.  Tachinid Flies are parasitoids, and the female lays an egg on a host that hatches and feeds on the internal organs of the host, eventually killing it.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

Tachinid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Tachinid Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Arlington, WA
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 02:13 PM EDT
I have two what looks like Giant Tachinid flies on my mint outside this week.  I took a number of photos as it looked way different than any I’ve seen.  It really looks like Giant, but according to all research I have found, its not located anywhere here .. only Europe and that region.   Are there Giant species here?  This was the size of a larger bumblebee.. so I noticed it at once.. stiff bristles on a smooth black body with orange head and wings.. so it stood out.    Funny enough the photos I find are all in the UK on mint as well.  Thank you for any clarification on this species.
How you want your letter signed:  Sammy Catiis

Tachinid Fly

Dear Sammy,
Tachinid Fly is a name used for a member of the parasitoid family Tachinidae.  According to BugGuide, a site dedicated to North American sightings:  “Second largest dipteran family (after Tipulidae), with ~1350 spp. in >300 genera of 4 subfamilies in our area(1) and >10,000 spp. in ~1600 genera worldwide; it is possible that only half of the species have been described.”  We searched for images of the Giant Tachinid Fly, and we found an image on Alamy from Wales that is identified as
Tachina grossa and it has a light collar of hairs behind the head, a distinctive feature also found on your individual.  The genus is also found in North America, and this BugGuide image also has the light collar.  Data indicates the genus is found in Washington.  Congratulations on identifying your individual to the genus level.  According to BugGuide “40 spp. in 2 subgenera in our area”  but most of the individuals posted to BugGuide are not identified to the species level, so we suspect they are difficult to identify from images.

Tachinid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly species?
Geographic location of the bug:  Creighton, KZN, South Africa
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 10:21 AM EDT
Found this indoors, looks like a fly, but never seen this one before.
Thought it was Rhachoepalpus immaculatus, but coloring not the same.
How you want your letter signed:  Terence

Tachinid Fly

Dear Terence,
This is a parasitoid Tachinid Fly.  According to Animal Diversity Web
Rhachoepalpus immaculatus is a Tachinid Fly.  Tachinidae is a large family with many similar looking individuals, so we cannot say for certain if your identification is correct to the species level, but you do have the family correct.

Thanks for the prompt responce.
Greatly appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination