Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee-like fly
Location: Southwest PA
July 12, 2017 2:14 pm
Please identify this bug. We just started seeing them around our house
Signature: Sheesh

Hover Fly

Dear Sheesh,
This identification is proving to be a challenge for us, but we believe we are on the right track.  We quickly eliminated the Beyonce Fly, which is a Horse Fly from Australia that has gotten much press lately, including on NBC News and Huffington Post.  The wing vein pattern seems to indicate this is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae as indicated on Microscopy UK.  We found several Hover Flies on BugGuide with gold butts, including this BugGuide image of a Narcissus Bulb Fly, but there are no black markings on the wings, and the antennae are not plumose.  When we stumbled on the Bug of the Week site, we finally found a furry Hover Fly with feathery antennae,
Volucella bombylans, and though this is a British site, we knew this genus is represented in North America, so we decided to research on BugGuide, and this is where things get confusing since BugGuide states:  “represented in our area by 3 spp., but the European V. bombylans does not occur in the New World” but all North American sightings are classified as “Species Volucella bombylans-complex.”  There are examples of British Volucella bombylans that are posted to Nature Spot and FlickR.  So, it is our conclusion that we have the genus correct, and this is either a member of the North American Volucella bombylans-complex or it is an introduced British Volucella bombylans. We hope to get a second opinion from Eric Eaton.  BugGuide also indicates that the genus is “under revision.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Bathroom
July 10, 2017 3:04 am
Over the last couple of days I found two of these in the bath tub now another one on bathroom rug. I have scowerd the internet trying to identify this as would like to understand where it could be coming from. It has no legs. I’d be surprised if they entering through the high up bathroom window. Then I thought they coming through plug hole… but now I find one on the floor I’m not so sure. Would love to know if you can help. Many thanks. Jelena
Signature: Jels

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Jels,
The identification is easy, but your other theoretical questions are not quite as easy.  This is a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly, and according to BugGuide:  “larvae of most feed on decaying organic debris. They are filter feeders in different kinds of aquatic media. They purify water by filtering microorganisms and other products.”  Since we don’t know where your bathroom is located:  on the 37th floor of a high rise, in a basement, in Singapore or in New York, speculating on the point of entry is questionable, but we suspect they are breeding in your drain.  If you are connected to a septic tank, this is even more likely.  We suspect these Rat-Tailed Maggots are now seeking a drier environment so they can initiate pupation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: death valley bee
Location: Darwin Falls, west of Death Valley National Park, CA
March 24, 2017 6:50 pm
Can you identify this bee (or fly)? I think the flower it is on is a Desert Gold (Geraea canescens) bush located in the western side of Death Valley National Park, near the Panamint Resort area.
Signature: Bonnie Borucki

Flower Fly

Dear Bonnie,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members of the family mimic bees and wasps for protection.  Harmless insects benefit from being confused with stinging insects.  We imagine you were in Death Valley during the peak bloom.  We are jealous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug on garage door
Location: Fullerton, CA
February 5, 2017 7:54 pm
Please solve our big mystery. I ve tried going to several bug sites to identify this thing to no avail. Can you please step in?
Signature: Greg Castro

Hover Fly

Dear Greg,
We believe we have correctly identified your Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae as
 Fazia (Allograpta) micrura thanks to the images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, California page.  Many harmless members of the family mimic stinging bees and wasps as a defense mechanism against predators.

Thank you so much for the speedy reply! Much appreciated!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or fly

Location: New Zealand
January 27, 2017 7:02 pm
Hi Bugman… can you identify this bug for me. The closest I can find is that it is a NZ Hoverfly, I have never seen one before so I am very interested in finding out the information you have about it. It was flying around inside yesterday (28.01/17) It is suppose to be summer here in New Zealand, but the weather here is very spring like. Yes I took the photo myself in our lounge. I hope it is clear enough.
Thank you
Signature: Ngaire Faull

Probably Hover Fly

Dear Ngaire,
Flies have one pair of wings while most other insects, including bees, have two pairs of wings.  Your insect appears to be a fly, judging by its shape and what we are able to make out of the antennae, but there is not enough detail in your image to be certain.

Thanks Daniel.. what sort of fly? Did you see the one yellow stripe and that long stinging looking thing off its behind?

We agree with comments provided by Cesar Crash that this is probably a Hover Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet
Location: graham, nc
December 10, 2016 2:42 pm
Hi,
I live in Graham, NC and saw these HUGE hornets at my new house in the country. They were swarming around the cable box, but I never saw any nest. They didn’t seem too aggressive, but sadly one had to go once it got in the house. Should I be worried about this one?
Thanks!
Signature: may

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Dear May,
Though it resembles a Hornet, this Good News Bee is actually a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, a harmless insect that does a very good job of mimicking a stinging insect.  Now that you know it is harmless, we hope you attempt to relocate any additional Good News Bees that enter your home.  An upturned glass and a postcard are great tools for the relocation process.  Since they are considered not only harmless but beneficial, since adult Good News Bees are pollinators and larvae eat destructive insects in the garden like Aphids, we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage in our continuing efforts to educate the web browsing public to the benefits of the lower beasts.

Thank you! Ugh, I feel terrible now that this one was killed, but I will be better to them in the future. How can you tell easily that this belongs to hover flies?

Flies belong to the order Diptera, which according to BugGuide is:  “Greek ‘two-winged’ (the name dates back to Aristotle, who noted the difference from typical four-winged insects.”  Flies have only one pair of wings while most insects have two pairs of wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination