Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please help 🙂
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast Pennsylvania
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 01:23 AM EDT
My three year old is very well known for his ability to spot the most camouflaged objects, insects, anything. He is the best shed  hunter I know. He found an assassin Bug today that I couldn’t even see while he was pointing at it. But he also found this other… Thing. We were deep in the woods, near a swamp as well as a creek. Pine needles for ground cover mostly, but tons of birch, maple, katalpa, just a huge variety of trees. Also, a huge cliff/rock wall. We like to go here because you can find basically anything in this habitat. But we have such trouble identifying them for that same reason. I imagine it’s a simple ID, but I just can’t find this one. Any help would be appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Devon Markarian

Flower Fly larva we believe

Dear Devon,
This is an immature insect and immature phases can be difficult to identify.  We believe this is a Flower Fly larva in the family Syrphidae.  You did not provide a size, and most Flower Fly larvae are under a half an inch in length.  If this was much larger than that, please let us know.  There are Flower Fly larvae pictured on Diptera Info and on the Oregon State University site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found on Asters and it appears to prey on bees
Geographic location of the bug:  Bloomington, Indiana
Date: 10/16/2017
Time: 09:31 PM EDT
I’ve seen a couple of these bugs. They are pretty small, only looking like a tiny piece of bark that fell onto the flower. They seem to park themselves on the aster and aren’t afraid of being photographed. Today, I got a shot of one sucking on the abdomen of a small bee. It looked like the bee wad dead.
How you want your letter signed:  Teddy Alfrey

Ambush Bug eats Flower Fly

Dear Teddy,
Your images are exquisite.  The predator in your images is an Ambush Bug, and though it resembles a bee, the prey is actually a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family SyrphidaeAmbush Bugs are frequently found on blossoms where they ambush insects, many of which are pollinators.

Ambush Bug

Daniel,
Thanks for the “exquisite” comment, and the quick reply!!
My thought was that the prey was something like a Mason Bee, but of course, you’re right about the Flower Fly.
I have quite a few insect photos on my Flickr page:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/teddyalfrey/albums
And on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/teddy.alfrey
Other than bees, my favorite insects to photograph are spiders, but I don’t get much love for my spider photos!
Thanks again!!!
Teddy.

We have published your links so maybe you will get some additional traffic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly that looks like a bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma City, OK
Date: 09/09/2017
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Found this little dude stealing salt off my leg
How you want your letter signed:  Zack

Hover Fly

Dear Zack,
This is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many perfectly harmless members of this family have shapes and coloration that mimic stinging wasps or bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Iowa Yellow Jacket Hoverfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Pella, Iowa
August 26, 2017 1:06 PM
Noisy little hover fly on my pine log pile. Very friendly.
How you want your letter signed :  Darin

Yellowjacket Hover Fly

Dear Darin,
The Yellowjacket Hover Fly is also commonly called a Good News Bee.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Israel
August 24, 2017 1:44 am
Can you tell me what type of bug this is? Photographed in Israel, August (Summer), may be obvious but I can’t seem to find it anywhere.
Any help appreciated
Signature: Ari

Hover Fly

Dear Ari,
This is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members of the family mimic stinging bees and wasps.  Your individual is an effective mimic of Thread-Waisted Wasps.  Though they look like stinging insects, Hover Flies are perfectly harmless, since they neither sting nor bite.  Hover Flies are beneficial in the garden.  Adults pollinate flowers and Syrphid larvae feed on Aphids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tell me what this is please
Location: East Sussex UK
August 19, 2017 2:01 pm
I have a big wasp like bug but it has a furry body. Can you tell me what it is please? It was in a jar of jam three day ago.
Signature: Kind regards?

Hornet Mimic Hover Fly and Yellowjackets

Unlike the surrounding Yellowjackets that are able to sting to defend themselves or their nest, the Hornet Mimic Hover Fly in the middle of your image neither stings nor bites, so it depends upon its protective mimicry to keep it safe from predators.  Many Hover Flies or Flower Flies in the family Syrphidae mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.  You can compare your individual to this image on the British Hoverflies site to verify our identification.  We suspect these critters were accidentally attracted to the jam jar when it was unintentionally left uncovered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination