Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug on garage door
Location: Fullerton, CA
February 5, 2017 7:54 pm
Please solve our big mystery. I ve tried going to several bug sites to identify this thing to no avail. Can you please step in?
Signature: Greg Castro

Hover Fly

Dear Greg,
We believe we have correctly identified your Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae as
 Fazia (Allograpta) micrura thanks to the images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, California page.  Many harmless members of the family mimic stinging bees and wasps as a defense mechanism against predators.

Thank you so much for the speedy reply! Much appreciated!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or fly

Location: New Zealand
January 27, 2017 7:02 pm
Hi Bugman… can you identify this bug for me. The closest I can find is that it is a NZ Hoverfly, I have never seen one before so I am very interested in finding out the information you have about it. It was flying around inside yesterday (28.01/17) It is suppose to be summer here in New Zealand, but the weather here is very spring like. Yes I took the photo myself in our lounge. I hope it is clear enough.
Thank you
Signature: Ngaire Faull

Probably Hover Fly

Dear Ngaire,
Flies have one pair of wings while most other insects, including bees, have two pairs of wings.  Your insect appears to be a fly, judging by its shape and what we are able to make out of the antennae, but there is not enough detail in your image to be certain.

Thanks Daniel.. what sort of fly? Did you see the one yellow stripe and that long stinging looking thing off its behind?

We agree with comments provided by Cesar Crash that this is probably a Hover Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet
Location: graham, nc
December 10, 2016 2:42 pm
Hi,
I live in Graham, NC and saw these HUGE hornets at my new house in the country. They were swarming around the cable box, but I never saw any nest. They didn’t seem too aggressive, but sadly one had to go once it got in the house. Should I be worried about this one?
Thanks!
Signature: may

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Dear May,
Though it resembles a Hornet, this Good News Bee is actually a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, a harmless insect that does a very good job of mimicking a stinging insect.  Now that you know it is harmless, we hope you attempt to relocate any additional Good News Bees that enter your home.  An upturned glass and a postcard are great tools for the relocation process.  Since they are considered not only harmless but beneficial, since adult Good News Bees are pollinators and larvae eat destructive insects in the garden like Aphids, we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage in our continuing efforts to educate the web browsing public to the benefits of the lower beasts.

Thank you! Ugh, I feel terrible now that this one was killed, but I will be better to them in the future. How can you tell easily that this belongs to hover flies?

Flies belong to the order Diptera, which according to BugGuide is:  “Greek ‘two-winged’ (the name dates back to Aristotle, who noted the difference from typical four-winged insects.”  Flies have only one pair of wings while most insects have two pairs of wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Honey Bee Mimic
Location: 30 miles West of Topeka, Kansas
October 21, 2016 10:24 pm
Hello,
I don’t need an I.D. For this Drone Fly. I just wanted to share a couple photos of this excellent faker.
It found me in N.E. Kansas, U.S.A., about the last week of September, 2016. Everybody I showed it to thought it was a honey bee.
Signature: Jeff from Kansas

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Dear Jeff from Kansas,
This excellent Honey Bee mimic is a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced in North America prior to 1874.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiger Bee?
Location: Hialeah Florida
October 1, 2016 8:20 pm
Oct. 1 I noted a bee that behaved differently from the usual honey bees I see. It spent a lot of time nectaring on a single lantana blossom, then flew only a few inches to the nearest blossom, and stayed on that one quite a while, too.
When I looked through the zoom lens I saw that it was definitely not a honey bee- with much larger eyes, a white ‘nose’, and no ‘hair’ on the back, which was striped instead of solid color, and it did not seem to be picking up pollen.
Is it perhaps some kind of leafcutter bee? It was very pretty and made me think of a tiger’s coloration.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear Curious in Florida,
This is not a Bee, but rather a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, a group that contains many members that mimic stinging bees and wasps for protection.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Palpada and according to BugGuide:  “Closely related to Eristalis but usually more colorful on the thorax and/or abdomen.”  While several species in the genus are found in Florida and look similar, we believe the closest visual match on BugGuide is Palpada vinetorum, and according to BugGuide:  “A robust syrphid, (typical of genus Palpada), yellowish-brown with gray bands on thorax. Legs reddish or yellowish, femora darker. Hind tibiae thick, arc-shaped. Wings slightly darkened.”

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Thank you for satisfying my curiosity!
After I sent the ID request I wondered if perhaps it was a fly pretending to be a bee (I now have a mental image of flies dressing up as bees for Halloween and going around with tiny sacks to collect nectar). It sure looks like the Palpada vinetorum in the BugGuide pics. You are amazing. :^)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / wasp id
Location: North Devon
September 9, 2016 9:13 am
Can you please tell me what this bee / wasp is
Signature: Any way

Hornet Hoverfly

Hornet Hoverfly

This is a Hornet Hoverfly, Volucella zonaria, and according to the South West Grid for Learning Trust:  “This species is one of the larger hoverflies. It is sometimes seen in the UK in the late summer and autumn feeding on the flowers of Ivy. Hoverflies often mimic species of wasp or in this case a hornet.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination