Currently viewing the category: "Soldier Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found a bug I’ve never seen before
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Victoria, Australia
Date: 04/28/2018
Time: 05:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bug man, found this sick looking bug when out camping. I’ve never seen anything like it before
How you want your letter signed:  From brett

Flightless Female Soldier Fly: Boreoides subulatus

Dear Brett,
The first time we received an image of this species of flightless Female Soldier Fly
Boreoides subulatus, we did not know if we were looking at a mutilated individual that was missing its wings.  The species is pictured on iNaturalist and on Atlas of Living Australia, and according to the Museums Victoria site:  “Female Wingless Soldier Flies are seen on walls and fences, laying masses of long white eggs. Larvae live in damp soil or rotting vegetation, especially in or near compost.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mid Atlantic. Southern Delaware by the ocean
Date: 01/23/2018
Time: 11:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I brought my red worm composting operation in doors because of the super cold temperatures.  I am sure these bugs hatched in the worm bin.  I have seen at least a dozen of them in the house.  I looked in the worm bin and there were several in the bin. If the picture is not adequate I probably can get a better one.
Thanks for all your efforts!
How you want your letter signed:  David Elder

Black Soldier Fly

Dear David,
This Black Soldier Fly,
Hermettia illucens, also called a Window Fly because of the transparent areas on the abdomen, is perfectly harmless.  Its larvae have no doubt been living in your compost pile and the warm conditions indoors probably hastened the maturing process.

Thanks so much DAN da Man!
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug/worm in standing water?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern CA – Mendocino Coast
Date: 11/11/2017
Time: 04:59 PM EDT
I’ve been seeing a lot of these worm bugs floating/swimming in the standing water on top of my composter.  They are alive and move around slowly in the water.  They’re almost an inch long and kind of skinny if you see them sideways (2nd photo).  Can you tell me what this is?
Thanks so much!
How you want your letter signed:  Laurie York

Black Soldier Fly Pupa

Dear Laurie,
This is a Black Soldier Fly Pupa, and their presence in your compost pile is a sign that it is healthy.  According to Daily Dump:  “The Black Soldier Fly Maggots are prolific creatures that appear in all compost heaps – they are nature’s scavengers and good for composting. They love a very wet pile. …  If it’s too much and you want to avoid them coming out and crawling on your floor, you can put your composter in a plastic tub with high sides. They usually cannot crawl out of that slippery vertical surface. If they crawl out and wander all over, then sweep them up, collect them in a container and drop them under a tree – birds love them!  Remember that these BSF maggots suppress the lifecycle of the pest carrying housefly. The Soldier flies have no mouth and cannot transmit pathogens, so they are harmless. Appreciate them. They are even a fried delicacy in some cultures as they are very rich in protein!” 

Black Soldier Fly Pupa

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for writing me with this info about the Black Soldier Fly Pupa.  Now when I see them I’ll not be frightened and know that they are beneficial in my compost pile.
I appreciate the helpful info you sent me.
Be well,
Laurie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some kind of fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Stillwater, Oklahoma
Date: 08/30/2017
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
What is this? I have never seen this before, and it was sitting on a hummingbird feeder outside my mother-in-law’s apartment in north central Oklahoma (Stillwater).
How you want your letter signed:  Shelley M

Soldier Fly

Dear Shelley,
We can’t understand why the beautiful green Soldier Flies in the genus
Hedriodiscus have no common names.  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe your individual is Hedriodiscus binotatus.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Often superficially resemble wasps in appearance and behavior. Adults vary widely in color and shape. Wings at rest are folded scissorlike across the abdomen. Antennae characteristic in having a long terminal segment which, when bent, gives a flagged appearance.”  Tree of Life notes:  “The adults are most often collected on foliage in damp forests, near bodies of water, or near boggy areas (James 1981).”

Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp like bug?
Location: England, Lancashire
June 25, 2017 5:24 am
Want to identify the bug. It landed on some clothing and it had a good grip, it would not let go of the cloth easily. It also did not fly away when disturbed.
Thanks
Signature: ?

Banded General

Though we did not recognize the species, we suspected this might be a Soldier Fly in the family Stratiomyidae, and we soon found the Banded General, Stratiomys potamida, pictured on Nature Spot where it states:  “It is a slow and cumbersome flyer, often seen feeding on umbellifers and Bramble in wet and marshy areas” and “Its carnivorous larvae are amphibious, feeding in ponds and ditches.”  The site also states:  “Soldier flies get their name from their bold and bright colours and markings. This is a particularly striking example – looking like a very flat wasp.”  FlickR states “One of the ‘big five’ soldierflies” and has some great images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this Botfly larvae
Location: South padre island
April 2, 2017 4:40 pm
Please help identify
Signature: Vivian

Black Soldier Fly Pupa

Dear Vivian,
This is definitely an immature phase of a Fly in the order Diptera, and we do not believe it is a Bot Fly.  We needed to research that South Padre Island is in Texas.  We suspect this might be a Black Soldier Fly pupa.  Was it found near a compost pile? 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination