Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
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??
I captured this fly eating this fly. I researched your site to see if I could come up with a name for it but found nothing. I looked up on the web and thought maybe it was a Cheese Skipper. Any help would be appreciated. Photo was captured in Mid-Ohio, last summer, and it was about 1⁄2 “ long.
Thank you in advance.
Travis

Hi Travis,
We believe this is a Robber Fly, and we will check with Eric Eaton to get his opinion. Eric provided this confirmation: “Yes, it is definitely a robber fly. The prey looks like an aphid, perhaps even a woolly aphid, making that a pretty small robber fly! Eric”

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Australian Robber Fly
Hello,
GREAT site! I am very impressed and have only looked at a fraction of your excellent site! Attached is a photo of a Robber Fly from Central West NSW, Australia you may wish to use on your site. Regards
Stephen

Hi Stephen,
We absolutely love all the wonderful submissions we get from Australia during our northern winter.

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VERY LARGE ROBBER FLY
I’VE ALWAYS CALLED THEM PREDATOR FLY..BUT IT SEEMS IT’S A ROBBER FLY. THIS VERY LARGE ONE WAS ON MY DECK RAIL. IT’S LENGTH IS AT LEAST 2″, THE LARGEST I’VE EVER SEEN. THAT YELLOW JACKET IS ABOUT 5/8″ LONG TO GIVE A COMPARISON. JUST WANTED TO SHARE.
RON.

Hi Ron,
Your Giant Robber Fly is sure impressive, and justifiably earns the name Predator Fly. We believe this is Promachus hinei.

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Can’t identify on your site. Bugguide.com or internet
Your site is one of my favorites!!! I scan it weekly. I send several hours learning about the amazing creatures that share this world with us. I do have a bug I have been unable to identify. I have looked on your site, Bugguide and tried every combination I could think of on the internet to identify these little beauties. I live in Navasota, TX and this summer was the first time I have ever seen these guys. Keep up the awesome work!!! Is there anything (besides trying to research on our own first), that we, the grateful readers of this amazing site, can do to help…donations…resources…etc??
Robin

Hi Robin,
We believe these are Wasp Mimicing Robber Flies. They resemble an insect in the genu Ceraturgus on BugGuide, but the match is not exact. By the looks of things, you should be seeing more next year. Thank you for your kind thoughts, but at the moment, we are not set up for contributions. We are still selling our calendars through the gift shop and clicking on some of our ads does help pay the high cost of web hosting. WE are going to try to get Eric Eaton to weigh in on the identification. Eric quickly provided the exact species: “Right family at least:-) These are indeed robber flies, in the genus Laphria. The species is Laphria saffrana, or something like that. That species is also featured on bugguide. Keep up the great work! Eric”

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spider eating robberfly
I was walking by one of my flower beds and happened to see this spider grab a Robber Fly. I was wondering what kind of spider it is. I only got the one picture before the spider ran away dragging his meal along with him. I appreciate any help you can give me. Thanks…..
Marsha Denney, SW. Missouri

Hi Marsha,
This is a Jumping Spider in the genus Phidippus. It might be Phidippus apacheanus, a female.

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hanging thief
Bugman
I think you had a picture of one of these in your fly section not hanging. I wasn’t sure from the picture but when you called it a hanging thief I knew right away. Here’s one hanging and eating.
Bill

Hi Bill,
Wow!!! What an awesome photo. That Hanging Thief seems to be enjoying the Yellow Jacket it captured. Thanks for sending such an iconic image our way.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination