Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Archilestris magnificus
Location: Palominas, Arizona
August 25, 2016 7:37 pm
I actually found out what this guy was from your website when I first photographed it in 2013. Haven’t seen it since, until yesterday. First photo from 2013, second from yesterday, 8/24/2016. They seem to like being photographed, quite the posers!
Signature: mtnrow

Robber Fly:  Archilestris magnificus

Robber Fly: Archilestris magnificus

Dear mtnrow,
Thanks so much for providing us with documentation of two sightings of this magnificent Robber Fly,
Archilestris magnificus, a species we first posted back in 2007.

Robber Fly:  Archilestris magnificus

Robber Fly: Archilestris magnificus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Perry Hall, Maryland
August 22, 2016 2:43 pm
Please tell me what insect this is. I have never seen it before and I am curious to know. Thank you.
Signature: I don’t understand this question

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

This large Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly or a Bee Panther since it frequently preys upon bees and wasps that it catches on the wing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly?
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
August 21, 2016 7:40 pm
I had an interesting visitor in the drive through at McDonald’s today. A large flying insect flew in my car window. I have never seen anything quite like it, so I started taking pictures of it with my cell phone. It landed on my cell phone case and stayed there, so I popped my cell phone out of the case and took several one-handed closeups. It seemed quite content to model for me and flew away when I was done.
Signature: Gary Manis

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Gary,
Your Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes.

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what am I dealing with
Location: Mount solon, va
August 19, 2016 11:45 am
Dear bug man we live out in the country of Augusta county and have noticed an odd type wasp looking bug… my son who is 6 was stung the past two days about 6 times in two different periods… I saw this guy nearby and feel this is the culprit… if you could please help in identifying I would greatly appreciate it
Signature: crystal

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear Crystal,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, a group known as Hanging Thieves because they frequently hang by one leg while eating.  Hanging Thieves are not aggressive toward humans, but they are capable of biting if they are carelessly handled, but that would have required your son catching one and getting bitten.  We do not believe a Hanging Thief is responsible for the stings your son received.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug ID request
Location: coopersburg, Pa
August 18, 2016 3:19 pm
Saw these two bugs on my back deck in Coopersburg, Pa. They are about 1 1?2 inches long. Would love to know what they are.
Thank You,
Dan
Signature: banjodan

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Dear banjodan,
These are mating Giant Robber Flies or Bee Killers in the genus
Promachus, a group that includes the Red Footed Cannibalfly.  We turned to BugGuide to see if we could find a species match for you, and we were surprised to find your image which was submitted to them last week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s This!
Location: Inglewood, California (Southern, CA)
August 17, 2016 4:48 pm
Hello!
I was walking from my car to work in Inglewood, CA today, August 17, 2016, and found this guy on my way. I would say he\she was about an inch to an inch and 1/2 long and pretty stout. Could you please help me identify?
P.S. BUGS RULE
Signature: Amanda Paull

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

Dear Amanda,
This is
Mallophora fautrix, the only Bee Killer, a Robber Fly in the genus Mallophora, found in California, though according to BugGuide there are six species found in North America, including the formidable Belzebul Bee-Eater from Texas. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination