Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Prehistoric Wasp-ish Bug Creature ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Leming, TX, USA
Date: 07/08/2020
Time: 08:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, I have seen the attached waspish creature here in the Texas Brush Country in summers past. It’s about 1.5-2 inches tall, and it looks like it’s wearing a fuzzy sweater vest. Just seems to sit there and stare at me, hence the desire to know something about my observer. Thanks a bunch in advance, Bugman.
How you want your letter signed:  Debbie LV

Robber Fly: Possibly Saropogon hypomelas

Dear Debbie,
This is one impressive predatory Robber Fly, and Texas has its share of giant Robber Flies.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Saropogon, possibly Saropogon hypomelas which is pictured on BugGuide.

Hi Daniel, WOW! I am so glad to know we have an obviously well-fed beneficial! That eats grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs! I will be sure to express appreciation instead of abject fear when next we meet.Thank you so much for your reply.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  San Antonio TX
Date: 07/06/2020
Time: 05:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Took a few photos of this beautiful bug in my backyard.
May be a robber fly just hatched.
How you want your letter signed:  Niccodemure

Belzebul Bee Eater

Dear Niccodemure,
Thanks so much for sending in your gorgeous images of a very impressive Belzebul Bee Eater, one of the most magnificent North American Robber Flies. Daniel is running a bit behind this month, but he has selected your submission as the Bug of the Month for July 2020

Belzebul Bee Eater

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this found in clarinda
Geographic location of the bug:  Clarinda victoria
Date: 02/04/2020
Time: 07:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife found this at the park. Never seen it before in my life. What on earth is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Mik

Unknown Robber Fly

Dear Mik,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  There are many species pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue robber fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mudgee, nsw
Date: 01/01/2020
Time: 03:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw anothe post with a very similar fly and you said it was an exciting find, so I thought I’d send you mine. Never seen one before, I assume it’s come to escape the fires.
How you want your letter signed:  Cheers, Jeremy.

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Jeremy,
We always love posting excellent images of large Robber Flies, arguably among the most adept winged insect predators.  We believe you are correct that this is a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, based on images posted online.  The human finger for scale is a nice addition.  We are well aware of the horrific fires currently burning in Australia.

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a giant blue robber fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Dapto NSW
Date: 11/22/2019
Time: 11:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this in our backyard….what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Gwen age 8

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Gwen,
We apologize for the delay in our response.  Daniel was out of the office for over a week spending the Thanksgiving holiday with his 90 year old mother and he did not answer any mail.  We agree that this is most likely a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, which is one impressive predator.  Your images are awesome.  Can you provide us with any observation details from the sighting?

Giant Blue Robber Fly

It stayed in the same position for days- we thought it was dead!!  Then just disappeared! Was amazing to look at though!

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Biting Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Tyler, Texas
Date: 08/31/2019
Time: 12:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We see these ‘bugs’ usually in the fall. Their bite is painful and leaves whelps. Wasp killer spray does them in so we got pictures this time.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob & Elaine

Possibly Robber Fly

Dear Bob & Elaine,
Normally we would expect a large biting fly to be a Horse Fly or a Deer Fly, and this looks more to us like a predatory Robber Fly, but we have not had any luck matching your images to a species.  While we caution readers not to carelessly handle large Robber Flies as they might bite, we do not know of any reports of unprovoked bites from Robber Flies.  We will be sending your images to Eric Eaton to get a second opinion on its identity.

Possibly Robber Fly

Eric Eaton Responds.
Hi, Daniel:
Yes, it is a robber fly, but I suspect that it is guilty by association with something like a horse fly or deer fly.  Robber flies do NOT habitually bite people.  They are strictly predators of other insects.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination