Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cannibal fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hudson River Valley, New York
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 07:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. I took this picture just hoping to get an up close pic of what I thought was some sort of horsefly. I zoomed in to find he was eating a smaller fly. He flew away with the fly right after I took the picture . Just wondering what it is . Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Sanders Trippe

Robber Fly with Prey

Dear Sanders,
This is a Robber Fly with its Dipteran prey, but the dark color leads us to believe it is not a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Type of Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Charlotte NC
Date: 08/27/2018
Time: 08:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was on our bedroom window when I opened the curtain this morning. I’ve tried all the bug guides but don’t see anything similar to even start looking. Is it some kind of fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you!

Red Footed Cannibalfly

This predatory Robber Fly is one of the Giant Robber Flies in the genus Promachus, probably a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California
Date: 08/22/2018
Time: 01:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, my sister sent me these photos of what looks like a furry dragonfly.  I did a bit of research and found that it looks similar to a red footed cannibalfly…. what do you think?
How you want your letter signed:  Astrid

Robber Fly

Dear Astrid,
This is a large Robber Fly, judging by the ash seed used as scale, but it is not a Red Footed Cannibalfly, an eastern species.  It looks similar to this
Machimus species pictured on the Natural History of Orange County site, but we cannot state for certain that is a correct genus identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  East Berlin PA
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 04:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you help identify the bug in the attached picture? It looked like it was eating the other bug, and its long body reminded me of a dragonfly.  I really have no idea what it is.  Your help is very much appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Treger

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats prey

Dear Cindy,
The predator in your image is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus Promachus, and we believe it is a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen this before HELP!!!!
Geographic location of the bug:  East TN
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Bugman,
I was at work when this fellow showed up nobody knows what it is. I was a little freaked out (ok a lot). Looks like some sort of crazy bee.
How you want your letter signed:  Christina

Giant Robber Fly

Dear Christina,
This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a predatory species that often catches large winger prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Glen mills, pa
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 10:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What it this bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Katie

Hanging Thief Carnage

Dear Katie,
This magnificent predator is a Hanging Thief, a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, and they are not aggressive towards humans, but we suspect a bite might occur if a person tried to catch one with bare hands.  The Hanging Thief captures large flying insects, often on the wing, and then the Hanging Thief hangs from one leg to feed.   The prey are frequently Wasps as images here and here in our archives illustrate.  In our opinion, your image documents what we consider to be Unnecessary Carnage, and we hope any future encounters you have with a Hanging Thief will end differently now that you have learned a bit about this amazing creature. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination