Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp/Bee/Strange Specimen?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tumwater, Washington, near the Deschutes River
Date: 12/18/2018
Time: 01:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I caught this aggressive little guy alone when he landed on a plant near a riverbank in Tumwater, Washington – near Olympia. After hours of entomological research I cannot for the life of me find something with a thorax like this, but “furry”.
How you want your letter signed:  out-of-options

Robber Fly

Dear out-of-options,
Your identification research did not prove successful because, though it resembles a stinging insect, this is not a Bee nor a Wasp in the order Hymenoptera, but rather a predatory Robber Fly in the order Diptera and the family Asilidae.  It sure looks to us like it might be the Bee-like Robber Fly
Laphria columbica which is pictured on BugGuide and reported from Washington.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I think it is under the order Mecoptera
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney Australia
Date: 11/22/2018
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I live in Sydney Australia and it is currently late spring.
I spotted this insect on my balcony and think it is under the order Mecoptera. I tried to catch it to give to donate to the entomology department at the University of Sydney because I know they don’t have many.
I am very interested in knowing what type of insect it is because I spent 3 months catching insect for my entomology major work and just handed it in. Shame I didn’t find one 3 week earlier!
Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Ethan

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Ethan,
This is definitely NOT a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera.  It is a True Fly in the order Diptera, and we believe it is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We believe it might be a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, which is pictured on Brisbane Insects where it states:  “The Giant Blue Robber Fly has the relatively small head, legs are not long but with board abdomen. The body and legs is covered with short grey hairs. Whole body, includes eyes, abdomen and legs are in dark steel blue colour. Pair of Wings are tinted in steel blue as well. “

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  robber fly id
Geographic location of the bug:  barnegat new jersey
Date: 10/14/2018
Time: 08:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  giant robber fly – asilidae family. but what genus species? promachus?? seent at cloverdale farm county park 7/28/18. i always have robber fly questions, any resources for field guides or at least to narrow down genera in nj?
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe you are correct that this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, and it looks most like Promachus hinei based on this BugGuide image, but that species is only reported as far east as Ohio on BugGuide.  It might be the same species as your previous submission.  You can try submitting your images to BugGuide to see if the network of contributors there can provide you with a species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber fly type
Geographic location of the bug:  monmouth county, new jersey
Date: 10/10/2018
Time: 04:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey i am looking through archived photos and i would love more specific input on this robber fly. is it possible to id genus/species from this photo. taken mid june 2016. at the time i thought hanging thief but that’s as far as i got. thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, but we are not certain of the species.  See BugGuide for examples.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge bee
Geographic location of the bug:  North Florida
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This large bee thing buzzed my position.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurtz

Southern Bee Killer

Dear Kurtz,
This is not a Bee.  It is a Southern Bee Killer,
Mallophora orcina, or another member of the genus, and it is pictured on BugGuide.  It is a predatory Robber Fly that mimics a large Bee and that feeds primarily on Bees and Wasps as well as other large flying insects.  Based on data for BugGuide sightings, this is a late season sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cannibal fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hudson River Valley, New York
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 07:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. I took this picture just hoping to get an up close pic of what I thought was some sort of horsefly. I zoomed in to find he was eating a smaller fly. He flew away with the fly right after I took the picture . Just wondering what it is . Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Sanders Trippe

Robber Fly with Prey

Dear Sanders,
This is a Robber Fly with its Dipteran prey, but the dark color leads us to believe it is not a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination