Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
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Subject: What is this in my house?
Location: Columbus Indiana
July 15, 2017 10:01 am
I found this on my cup in the kitchen. Took it out side and blew it off the cup. The next second the door was open it flew right back in. Very long legs with spikes hairs in the lower part and flies very lazily dipping as it flies around.
Signature: Thank you, T

Hanging Thief

Dear T,
This predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites uses its long legs to capture prey on the wing.  It eats, often dangling from one leg, which led to the common name Hanging Thief.

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Subject: What type of insect
Location: Southern-Central Illinois
July 11, 2017 5:05 pm
Saw this outside the window. At first thought it was a wasp but then it landed and when I looked at it more closely it resembled a mosquito. What type of insect is this?
Signature: J. Fortado

Hanging Thief

Dear J. Fortado,
This distinctive looking Robber Fly is a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  Those long legs are used to capture prey.  These are predatory hunters that take their prey on the wing, and they often eat while hanging from one leg, hence the common name Hanging Thief.

Hanging Thief

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug bit wife
Location: North Carolina
July 10, 2017 7:38 pm
Hey was just wondering what this bug was is
Signature: Ryan

Robber Fly

Dear Ryan,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  Robber Flies generally take prey on the wing, and large Robber Flies are capable of attacking large prey.  Robber Flies are not aggressive, but they do have mouths adapted to piercing the hard exoskeletons of insect prey, including Dragonflies and large Wasps, and then sucking fluids from the now dead prey.  We doubt this Robber Fly dive bombed and attacked your wife.  You did not provide much in the way of details, but we suspect perhaps this Robber Fly found itself trapped inside your wife’s clothing and then bit defensively.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any ideas?
Location: Michigan
July 2, 2017 10:56 am
This bug was on my deck. I live in Michigan. Does anyone know what it is?
Signature: Thank you! Christie Haines

Robber Fly with Prey

Dear Christie,
This is a predatory Robber Fly, probably a member of the genus Promachus, a group whose members are called Giant Robber Flies or Bee Killers according to BugGuide.  It might be
Promachus bastardii based on BugGuide images.

Robber Fly with Prey

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Subject: Unusual flying insect
Location: NC USA
July 2, 2017 10:14 am
This insect photo was taken July 2 at 1pm in Cape Carteret NC. What is it?
Signature: Chris

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Chris,
We are relatively certain that your Robber Fly is a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Preys on large flying insects. Has been reported to attack Ruby-throated Hummingbirds”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: possible robber fly
Location: Plainsboro NJ
June 9, 2017 4:54 am
Greetings:
The small eyes and short antenna have me thinking this is some sort of bee-mimic. I saw some pictures of robber flies that look a little like this. Can you tell me if this is correct, and maybe narrow it down to a species?
And I suspect they’re having sex; does that sound right?
Found a weekend ago: June 3.
John
Signature: jpviolette

Mating Bee-Like Robber Flies

Dear John,
Your request arrived on the first day of our holiday and we are currently trying to post some of the best images that arrived while we were out of the office, and that includes your image of mating Robber Flies in the genus
Laphria, the Bee-Like Robber Flies.  Many species in the genus look similar, but we believe your individuals might be Laphria virginica based on images posted to BugGuide where they are described as:  “Easy to confuse with L. flavicollis. The main gestalt things to look for are the hairiness of the black abdomen, very fuzzy in virginica but somewhat glossy in flavicollis. The golden hair on the top of the thorax looks more swept back and finely constructed in flavicollis. And in virginica, the legs have a reddish brown tone to the fuzz in good light. –Herschel Raney, 4.v.2006.”

Greetings:
Thanks – I’m glad I was on the right track. I’ve gotten fairly good at recognizing some of my area’s more distinctive butterflies/dragonflies, but I have a much harder time with these guys (especially mimics).

John

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination