Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of bee?
Location: wimberly, tx
May 31, 2015 11:33 am
we are trying to figure out if this is a type of bee.
Signature: Tater bug

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Tater bug,
We believe we have properly identified your Bee Fly as Poecilanthrax lucifer, based on images posted to BugGuide where we learned:  “The larvae feed on the moth larva of members of the family Noctuidae.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Loving Bee Flies
Location: Andover, NJ
May 27, 2015 12:36 pm
Hoping you can narrow down an id on these bee mimics. I’m in northwestern NJ and have been seeing these around my garden for the last few weeks. This pair was making a very loud buzzing sound and stayed joined for at least 5 minutes before separating and buzzing off. At one point I eased them off the steps and onto a leaf, then transferred them to some flowers, hoping to get a better camera angle. I am thinking they are some sort of hoverfly?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Mating Narcissus Bulb Flies

Mating Narcissus Bulb Flies

Dear Deborah,
We believe these are mating Narcissus Bulb Flies,
Merodon equestris, which are in the Hover Fly family Syrphidae, not the Bee Fly family Bombyliidae, though we may be wrong.  You can verify our identification by comparing your images to those posted to BugGuide.

Thanks, Daniel!  As always, you’ve been a great help.
Debbi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: West Texas
Location: West Texas
May 25, 2015 12:55 pm
What is this strange bug? We have had a lot of rain lately, located in West Texas. Very interesting insect…
Signature: Ashley Jones

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Dear Ashley,
This Robber Fly in the family Asilidae is an accomplished predator.  Based on images posted to the Plants and Insects of Goodwell and Texhoma site, this is a male
Efferia aestuans, a species with no common name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify this.
Location: North West Ireland
May 24, 2015 4:32 pm
This is a bug that has 6 legs. It looks like it has a very small abdomen. The bug has been seen in Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, Ireland, including my bedroom window. There is a photo of it I took. I have been mystified by this insect and can’t find it anywhere online.
Signature: Justin Doherty

Male March Fly

Male St. Marks Fly

Dear Justin,
We believe this is a male, because of his big eyes, March Fly in the family Bibionidae.  Your individual looks similar to the image posted on the GoFlyFishingUK site.
  After visiting iSpotNature, we believe this is a St. Marks Fly, Bibio marci.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Horse fly
Location: Penang Island, Malaysia
May 18, 2015 10:13 pm
I really enjoy browsing your site, so I thought I’d share these with you. I took these pictures yesterday evening. Based on what I could tell, this specimen appear to be a female horse fly though I’m not sure of the exact species.
Signature: Wei Nien

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Good Morning Wei,
You are correct that this is a female Horse Fly.
  A quick search online did not produce any visual matches in the family Tabanidae in Malaysia.

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to identify this bug
Location: Rhode Island
May 15, 2015 9:14 am
for two days now there has been a huge number of these bugs suddenly appear in my back yard. No standing water. It is the middle of May here in Rhode Island
Signature: Sylvia

March Fly

March Fly

Hi Sylvia,
This looks like a March Fly in the family Bibionidae to us, and the large eyes indicate it is a male.  The March Fly family includes the infamous Love Bugs that are found in the south.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults emerge synchronously in huge numbers and often form dense mating aggregations. Males form loose “swarms” and copulate immediately with females as they emerge from the soil. After mating, female bibionines dig a small chamber in the soil with their fossorial fore tibiae, lay eggs, and die within the chamber (Plecia lay eggs on the soil surface). Adults are short-lived (3-7 days).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination