Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  hanging-thief in Western MA?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northampton, MA
Date: 07/25/2019
Time: 10:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I saw this bug in a parking lot near my house and thought it was a crane fly until it settled down and I got a good look at it. This is the best photo I could get before it flew off. (It’s hard to tell in this lighting but its eyes were green.) Doing some image searches has left me pretty sure it’s some kind of hanging-thief robber fly. Anyway I’ve never seen one of these before and I thought it was neat!
How you want your letter signed:  Matthew D.

Hanging Thief

Dear Matthew D.,
We agree with your identification of this Hanging Thief, a Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites.  Your subject line appears to question if their range includes Maryland and according to BugGuide data, they are found over much of eastern North America.  We are not sure if your research produced the etymology of the common name which refers to the Hanging Thieves’ habit of eating while hanging from one leg.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stonefly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Virginia
Date: 07/23/2019
Time: 08:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this insect a couple days ago when it landed on some dill flowers in my garden in northern Virginia. I thought it might be a type of stonefly, but the eyes seem off. Any help identifying this fella would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Danny

Hanging Thief

Dear Danny,
This Robber Fly is a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  Hanging Thieves get their common name from their habit of hanging from one leg while eating their prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug spotted while camping
Geographic location of the bug:  Naked Falls on the Washougal river
Date: 07/22/2019
Time: 11:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, when this bug landed on my bag I was intrigued. Growing up here I have never seen one like it and google image search is not giving me any results. Just curious about it if you have the time. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Loni Lane

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Loni,
We believe we have correctly identified this impressive, predatory Robber Fly as
Laphria columbica, one of the Bee-Like Robber Flies based on BugGuide images.

Wow!! That was so fast!! Thank you so much!! This was Washington state by the way. I realized I forgot that part in my original email
Thank you so much!
Loni Lane
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robbery fly
Geographic location of the bug:  location: GPS@43°47’39″N 15°40’51″E (19.0 m)
Date: 07/18/2019
Time: 03:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This about 3 cm bug was sucking a brombee in my garden. I have s lot if brombees in my lavender and ‘stockroses’. It had yellow-black legs with hairs. Long body with yellow-brown stripes and very long brownies wings folded onbthe back.
How you want your letter signed:  Wilma

Robber Fly eats Bumble Bee

Dear Wilma,
Based on the GPS coordinates your provided, Google Maps places this sighting in Croatia.  When we searched the internet for Croatian Robber Flies, we located this FlickR posting of 
Pogonosoma maroccanum which appears very similar to your individual.

Robber Fly eats Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject (please be succinct, descriptive and specific):  Robber Flies
Date: 07/21/2019
Time: 07:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A few years ago our property was somehow blessed with the presence of a gang of robber flies. My assumption is they came in on some dead trees that were brought in for milling. They have stuck around for several years now and I would like to make sure they are here for many more. They defend my porch voraciously against the vicious yellow jackets who were the previous residents before the robber flies came. Is there anyway I can insure the survival of the gang? Can I put up nesting sites or winter shelters of some sort? I noticed this year the gang is noticeably smaller after the harsh winter we had. I really don’t want to lose these guys.
Your name:  Tareesa

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket in British Columbia

Dear Tareesa,
Do you have one or more images of your Robber Flies?  If you do, please attach them to our response, but in the future, please use our standard submission form by clicking the ASK WTB? link on our site.  That way we would also have your location, an invaluable bit of information for identification purposes.  Knowing your exact species of Robber Fly might provide more specific information.  We located this family information according to BugGuide:  ” larvae usually in soil or decaying wood” and “Minimal courtship behavior. Females lay eggs in the soil or in plants. A few, such as
Mallophora and Megaphorus, form an egg mass on a plant stem (photo here). Larvae often predatory, consuming eggs and larvae of other insects in decaying matter. Typically overwinter as pupa, emerge in spring. Life cycle is 1-3 years.”  It seems rotting wood is the ideal habitat to encourage their presence.  The fact that you have had them for several years is evidence they have what they need, including Yellowjackets for food.

Thank you for the quick reply. I live in northern AZ. I don’t have a picture as these guys are VERY active. It took me forever to ID them and it wasn’t until I witnessed a midair snack session that I was sure of what I had. They are the large black and grey type with the tapered abdomen.Thank you for the additional information and the link. I will be on the look out for the larvae now. I freaking love these guys.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this in my garden?
Geographic location of the bug:  Zone 8a DFW Texas
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 03:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was out just a bit ago and saw this, not on a veggie plant but on a stake. Never seen anything like it!
How you want your letter signed:  Terry

Female Robber Fly

Dear Terry,
Before we were able to view your image, we guessed correctly that you wanted a Robber Fly identified, and Texas has some huge ones, including the Belzebul Bee-Eater.  Your individual is a female based on the stinger-like ovipositor, and we believe she is in the genus
Efferia.  Aerial predators like Robber Flies and Dragonflies frequently rest on sticks and dead branches.

Thank You! I saw another 2 yesterday. Worried cuz I don’t have many bees in the first place.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination