Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Darlington, County Durham
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 07:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there. Can you please help me identify this fly?
I found it in the kitchen after a party and it appeared to be sucking the surface of the cake lid.
I lifted it outside and it is still there this morning.
Is it friend or foe? I’d like to help it if needs be.
How you want your letter signed:  Victoria

March Fly

Dear Victoria,
This is a female March Fly in the family Bibionidae, a group sometimes called St. Mark’s Flies in the UK, though that common name might refer to only a single species in the genus Bibio.  Based on images posted to NatureSpot, your individual might be
Bibio johannis, or possibly Bibio pomonae, the Heather Fly.

March Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Potential Carpenter Bee Robber Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin, Texas 78757
Date: 08/06/2019
Time: 04:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took pictures of two of these very large black bees/flies this morning. I noticed them when refilling a water saucer in a shady woodland setting. Is this a beneficial creature for my certified wildlife habitat, or should I be worried for wood damage in the area?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Kat

Belzebul Bee-Eater

Dear Curious Kat,
This is definitely a predatory Robber Fly and not a Bee.  The white “cheeks” and yellow band on the abdomen are good indications this is a Belzebul Bee-Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “has been reported to attack and kill hummingbirds” but we suspect that is a very rare occurrence.  In our opinion, though they are known to prey on Bees, the Belzebul Bee-Eater would be a beneficial creature in your certified wildlife habitat as it is a native species.

Belzebul Bee-Eater

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What this bug name?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cambodia,northern plain
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 11:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was in jungle trekking for spotting wildlife and found a bug and took some photos but i could not find the specific name, please help
How you want your letter signed:  Bird and nature lover

Thanks you for response. Would this be possible for Hang Thieve or Robber Flies ? i just thinking.
Best Regards,
Hat

Robber Fly

Good Morning Hat AKA Bird and nature lover,
We are happy you were able to identify the magnificent predator in your gorgeous image as a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, but we don’t believe it is a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  We tried searching images of Robber Flies from Cambodia and other parts of Southeast Asia, and we found this FlickR image, but it is only identified to the family level.  It looks similar to Clephydroneura serrula which is figure 7 in an online pdf about Robber Flies from Vietnam on Onychium.  There is also an article in Vietnamese with an image on Vietnam National Museum of Nature site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify please
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 12:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  The big in the picture seems to always have its wings in an open position and so far have never seen more then one or tow in a location. Any help be very appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  T

Picture Winged Fly

Dear T,
This is a Picture Winged Fly,
Delphinia picta, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in decaying organic matter, such as compost.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast NE.
Date: 07/25/2019
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found this “bee” on the leaves of my rose bush while trying to figure out what’s been munching leaves. It’s bright lime green just like the photo, almost half an inch long and has a rather flat shaped abdomen with cool black designs. Not metallic like a sweat bee, if it is indeed a bee, but can’t find any info or pix that match.
Thank you,
Lois
How you want your letter signed:  Lois Colvin

Soldier Fly

Dear Lois,
This is not a Bee.  It is a Soldier Fly and we have identified it as
Hedriodiscus binotatus thanks to images posted on BugGuide.

Thank you! First time I’ve seen one in the 17 yrs since moving to NE.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some kind of fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Huntsville, Alabama
Date: 07/27/2019
Time: 04:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this bug on our windshield this afternoon. It took quite a ride with us. It did recover and fly away. We’r thought it looked kind of like a big horse fly, about the diameter of a 50 cent coin in length, except for the stripes and pointy abdomen.  Thank you for letting us know what it is!
How you want your letter signed:  Rex and Elizabeth

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Rex and Elizabeth,
This large, predatory Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and your request is the first submission we have received this year.  We typically post at least five images of Red Footed Cannibalflies each summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination