Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual flying bug
Location: Teaneck, nj
September 20, 2015 11:53 am
Please help me identify this creature. I have only recently noticed them hanging out in my yard
Signature: Mark

Picture Winged Fly

Picture Winged Fly

Dear Mark,
Your Picture Winged Fly is Delphinia picta, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Breeds in decaying organic matter, such as compost” so if you have a compost pile, that might explain their sudden appearance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug preying on fly?
Location: Kingston, Ontario
September 16, 2015 3:17 pm
Hey there Daniel!
I spent the evening in a mesh tent observing all sorts of bugs – some I’ll be sending for IDs if you feel like it! A robberfly, a dragonfly, many ants, a horsefly, some sort of wasp-mimic, I think. And then, these two.
I think it’s a sort of assassin bug munching on a house fly. He has red eyes and a sort of yellow-borded red saddles on his back/abdomen.
Thanks for your time! I’m currently browsing through the posts so far – I’m on page 205 atm.
Signature: Dannie

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Dear Dannie,
By comparing your image to Assassin Bug nymphs on BugGuide, we believe we have correctly identified your individual as
Zelus luridus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Bug
Location: Gettysburg, PA
September 15, 2015 6:36 am
Hello,
This is a bug that flies and seemed to like the stems of grasses and wildflowers at Gettysburg National Military Park. I haven’t been able to find it anywhere. I thought it was a beetle, but someone said it’s a fly that mimics a beetle. Please help.
Signature: Clueless but Hopeful

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Clueless bug Hopeful,
We have identified your beautiful Flower Fly or Hover Fly from the family Syrphidae as
Eristalinus aeneus thanks to this image on BugGuide.  It really does have distinctive eyes and the space between the eyes indicates your individual is a female.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, adventive in NA and now widespread in e. NA (ON-FL)” and “In Europe, larvae often found associated with decaying seaweed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s This Bug?
Location: Central Alabama
September 12, 2015 3:43 pm
I’m in central Alabama and saw this amazing bug today and would love to know his name. I have photos to help with the I.D.
He was about 1 1/4 inch long. Two black compound eyes. Four brown and black hairy legs. A proboscis, and a stinger-like projectile from his rear end. A segmented thorax. He had a medium to light brown body.
Thanks in advance for your help.
Signature: Barbara Bryan

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Barbara,
We really love posting images of Red Footed Cannibalflies, a predatory Robber Fly found in the eastern U.S. that appears from mid to late summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Regina, Sask., Canada
September 6, 2015 5:51 pm
need your hep to i.d this fly. Surprised to find it on my hydrangea. Suspect it may be a hover fly, but have never seen one here in Saskatchewan, Canada.
Signature: Geo McBride

Long Legged Fly

Long Legged Fly

Dear Geo,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, and it looks very close to a member of the genus
Condylostylus which is well represented on BugGuide.

Long Legged Fly

Long Legged Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My morning mailbox surprise
Location: Dayton, OH
September 3, 2015 5:47 am
Good morning! Today, this little guy was waiting to ask me how badly I really wanted to check the mail today. He hung around long enough for me to get a couple of pictures, did an impressive flyby in the general direction of my face, and took off.
I don’t know if it’s at all relevant, but there was also a large house centipede behind the mailbox, which was another first.
Signature: Amorette

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear Amorette,
We don’t believe there is any connection between the House Centipede and the Hanging Thief, a large predatory Robber Fly.  Hanging Thieves, though predators, tend to take prey on the wing and House Centipedes would not be part of their diet.  They often feed while dangling from a single leg, hence the common name Hanging Thief.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination