Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Grey Forest, Texas
November 8, 2015 11:28 am
We live near San Antonio, Texas and have seen this fellow a couple of times. He behaves somewhat like a robber fly, but I could not find a robber fly that looks like him. He is very hairy and quite large, as you can see in comparison to the red wasp. Red wasps are about an inch and a half long. He is quite noisy and slow in flight.
Signature: Dylan Tobe

Belzebul Bee-Eater eats Red Wasp

Belzebul Bee-Eater eats Red Wasp

Dear Dylan,
This impressive Robber Fly is a Belzebul Bee-Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, a magnificent predator that is capable of catching on wing and eating large stinging insects.  We are very proud of some images in our archives of the courtship activity of Belzebul Bee Eaters.  We are also noting that your images indicate they were taken in August, and not in November.

Dear Daniel:  Thank you for responding so quickly.  Yes, correct, we took the picture this summer, but just found your site today.  Dylan

Now that you found us, you should visit more often.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying night bug
Location: Charlottesville, va
November 6, 2015 9:09 pm
This bug was a pest around the fire pit. Now they have come into the house. Any ideas?
Signature: Paula stith

Male March Fly

Male Fall March Fly

Dear Paula,
This is a male Fall March Fly, probably
Bibio longipes based on this description on BugGuide:  “Males are all black with swollen hind tarsi and are hard to distinguish from Bibio slossonae, the other common fall-flying species.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Large swarms consisting of males are common in the fall.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Palm Desert, CA 92260
October 15, 2015 10:45 pm
Is this bug harmful to my plants? Is it beneficial ( like ladybugs)? Thank you.
Signature: Erik

Stilt Legged Fly

Stilt Legged Fly

Dear Erik
We are confident that we have correctly identified your Stilt Legged Fly,
Micropeza stigmatica, based on images posted to BugGuide.  There is no food preference listed on the information page for the species, but we suspect this is a predator.  If we go to the family page on BugGuide, it states:  “Adults of some species are attracted to rotting fruit or dung; in other species adults are predaceous; larvae saprophagous” meaning the larvae feed on decaying organic matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wierd bug i named Jefery
Location: Meredith, Nh
October 2, 2015 7:05 pm
Found this in a rotten tree in Nh, what is it? Mostly see thru, seemed to have a stinger at the end of its tail.
Signature: Douglas Hewitt Jr

Rattailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Douglas,
This is the larva of a Drone Fly, commonly called a Rattailed Maggot.
  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae feed on rotting organic material in stagnant water” so we are wondering if there was any water in the rotten tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Eastern Crane Fly
Location: Washington, Pennsylvania
September 28, 2015 1:03 am
I found an interesting bug in my dogs water bowl and i had no idea what it was until i found it on your site. I wanted to share the photo of the Giant Eastern Crane Fly! This is the first time I’ve ever come across one of these beauties, and let me just say, I’m very glad to know it’s harmless!
Signature: Jessicarenae

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Dear Jessicarenae,
You are correct that this is a Giant Eastern Crane Fly,
Pedicia albivitta, and the stark white background in your image nicely illustrates the lovely markings on the wings of this species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified bugs
Location: Catskill, NY
September 28, 2015 3:26 am
On Sept 27, 2015, I photographed these two enjoying the after sun on my car door in Catskill, NY. They seemed to be enjoying themselves and so was I! Love to know what they are.
Thanks!
Signature: Ken Tannenbaum

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear Ken,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and they exhibit sexual dimorphism in that the head of the male is larger to accommodate the larger eyes.  We believe we have correctly identified your March Flies as
Penthetria heteroptera thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it indicates they are active in the fall, distinguishing them from most March Flies that appear in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination