Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: STILETTO FLY?
Location: Ouachita Mountains, Ark.
August 10, 2015 6:50 pm
Hi! Are these Stiletto Flies? Photographed on a small bridge overlooking a creek in Fannie, Arkansas. Only one photo of them mating before they left. Summer, Aug. 10th. Is this a common variety?
Signature: Bill Burton

Mating Flies

Mating Bee Flies

Dear Bill,
Though they resemble Stiletto Flies, we cannot find a matching image on BugGuide.  Among the most noticeable diagnostic features for us are the posterior edge of the eye having an unusual concave feature and the spacing between the eyes being almost equal between the male and the female.  We have requested assistance from Eric Eaton and we hope he can provide an identification soon.

Eric Eaton Identifies mating Bee Flies
Daniel:
I do recognize these as bee flies, family Bombyliidae.  I don’t recognize the genus offhand.  Herschel Raney’s “Random Acts of Nature” website might have pages devoted to bee flies of Arkansas.  I know he has lots on Arkansas *robber* flies…..
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Ed. Note:  We scanned the images on Random Natural Acts and BugGuide, but we could not conclusively identify these mating Bee Flies.  Assistance from our readership is always welcomed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug
Location: Oxfordshire
August 10, 2015 2:27 pm
Hi Bugman
I captured this beauty in Oxfordshire UK and have been struggling to identify it. Can you help ?
Signature: Gordon Sheret

Four Lined Horse Fly

Four Lined Horse Fly

Dear Gordon,
We immediately recognized your fly as a male Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae, and our search for its species identity led us to the Influential Points:  How to Catch Horse-Flies page and an image identified as
Atylotus rusticus (scroll down) with this information:  “As well as catching vast numbers of the commoner non-man-biting species (in particular Tabanus bromius), we have found host-seeking females of the very rare and local Atylotus rusticus both within and somewhat outside its usual haunts.”  An image on Nature Photo has convinced us that this is in fact a male Atylotus rusticus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Warble Fly ? Or ?
Location: Plymouth Devon UK
August 10, 2015 12:21 pm
Taken in Devon UK 10 August 2015
Signature: Jacko

Hoverfly:  Volucella inanis

Hoverfly: Volucella inanis

Dear Jacko,
Your Hoverfly is
Volucella inanis, and you can read more about it on the UK Diptera Index site.  According to UK Safari:  “These hoverflies resemble wasps for a very good reason.  The adults lay their eggs in wasp nests where the larvae feed on the larvae of the wasps.  The scientific name ‘inanis‘ is Latin for ‘inane’ or ’empty’.  Possibly a reference to the lack of stinging organ on this wasp-like insect.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cannibalfly?
Location: Split, Croatia
August 9, 2015 1:51 pm
Hi, I took this picture today on my balcony. I live in Split, Croatia. What kind of bug is that (tha one that eats) and is it normal to meet it in this area? Thank you!
Signature: Irena

Robber Fly and Prey

Robber Fly and Prey

Dear Irena,
The predator in your image is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We are uncertain of the species, or if it is native to Croatia, but this posting on Diptera Info indicates that members of the family are found in Croatia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Adorable Bees
Location: 15 miles North of Plankinton, SD
August 7, 2015 11:34 am
Dear Bugman,
Can you help me identify these adorable fuzzy bees? I believe they are a native species. They are very docile, feeding on coneflowers, I can gently touch their abdomens. They enjoy watering time, as it is quite hot and dry! There is also a couple of other species of small bees in the pics. Thanks so much. My father and son love your site!
Signature: Kate, Nature Lover

Bee Flies

Bee Flies

Dear Kate, Nature Lover,
Though they resemble Bees, most of the insects in your images are Bee Flies in the family Bombyliidae, probably in the Tribe Bombyliini which is pictured on BugGuide.  Bee Flies and other True Flies can be distinguished from other insects, including Bees, because Flies have a single pair of wings and most other insects have two pairs of wings.  Bee Flies, which do not sting, benefit from their resemblance to stinging Bees.  One of your images includes a single Bee Fly on the same blossom as what appears to be a Longhorned Bee.

Bee Flies

Bee Flies

Longhorned Bee (left) and Bee Fly

Longhorned Bee (left) and Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee?
Location: Midland, Texas
July 31, 2015 11:16 am
This looks like a bee but the hairy legs and wings look strange.
Signature: TLW

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

Dear TLW,
This magnificent predatory Robber Fly is a Bee Killer in the genus
Mallophora, and we believe we have correctly identified it as Mallophora fautrix by comparing your images to this image on BugGuide.

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination