Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black wings with yellow wody
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Tennessee
Date: 09/08/2019
Time: 07:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These are all over my porch , theye are bigger than a knat but smaller that a fly
How you want your letter signed:  Peggy plant

Dark Winged Fungus Gnat

Dear Peggy,
We are so sorry because this has been on the back burner for nearly a week because we thought this was a March Fly but we were never able to find a match in that family.  This is a Dark Winged Fungus Gnat in the family Sciaridae based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Often found in flowerpots. In moist and shadowy areas up to 70% of all Diptera species can be Sciaridae.”

Dark Winged Fungus Gnat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Biting Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Tyler, Texas
Date: 08/31/2019
Time: 12:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We see these ‘bugs’ usually in the fall. Their bite is painful and leaves whelps. Wasp killer spray does them in so we got pictures this time.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob & Elaine

Possibly Robber Fly

Dear Bob & Elaine,
Normally we would expect a large biting fly to be a Horse Fly or a Deer Fly, and this looks more to us like a predatory Robber Fly, but we have not had any luck matching your images to a species.  While we caution readers not to carelessly handle large Robber Flies as they might bite, we do not know of any reports of unprovoked bites from Robber Flies.  We will be sending your images to Eric Eaton to get a second opinion on its identity.

Possibly Robber Fly

Eric Eaton Responds.
Hi, Daniel:
Yes, it is a robber fly, but I suspect that it is guilty by association with something like a horse fly or deer fly.  Robber flies do NOT habitually bite people.  They are strictly predators of other insects.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego, CA
Date: 08/31/2019
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a Tachnid Fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlene

Green Bottle Fly

Dear Marlene,
This looks to us like a Green Bottle Fly,
Lucilia sericata, which is pictured on the Natural History of Orange County and on BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on carrion. Adults take nectar and have been used as pollinators of onions, cabbages and also other Brassicaceae” and “Larvae are used in forensics to determine the age of a corpse, and in medicine to clean up wounds (they feed on partially decomposed tissue, leaving the healthy one alone).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  1.5 to 2 inch bug hovering over garden
Geographic location of the bug:  Allentown, Pennsylvania
Date: 08/29/2019
Time: 02:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We’ve got a serious Spotted Lantern fly invasion over here. As I swatted a few out in the back porch I happened to see something hovering and then landing on a flower plant in my garden. I was shocked to see what looked like a giant wasp or hornet. It was about 1.5 to 2 inches in length. I searched for the slim waist to identify if it was a wasp but it was think all over with large dark eyes. I ran in my house to get the phone to snap a picture. After a few unclear shots I crouched a bit to get a better shot and it saw me and flew like a flash to scope out where I was. I jetted outta there lol and fearfully stood behind my screen door watching it until it flew away. I searched online but could not find any-bug similar. Can you help me identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Best Regards Prisilla

Yellowjacket Hover Fly

Dear Prisilla,
Your account of your encounter with this Yellowjacket Hover Fly is riveting.  Though it mimics a stinging insect for protection, the Yellowjacket Hover Fly is perfectly harmless.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Your individual is also a male, so it might have been staking out territory where it might find a suitable mate.  According to BugGuide:  “Flies aggressively and buzzes like a hornet. In the south, sometimes called the ‘[good] news bee’ for its habit of hovering in front of a person ‘giving the news’. It is also said to be good luck if one can get the insect to perch on a finger, no doubt because this is difficult to do.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Vancouver area, British Columbia, Canada
Date: 08/26/2019
Time: 09:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I came across this aggressive little monster outside in late August near Vancouver. He was easily 2x the size of a honeybee, and while he preferred hanging out on the wooden bench, he made several short (1-2 second) flights before finding a new landing spot each time on the bench. He even had a mid-air tumble with a flying insect who dared to pass near him. He seemed quite aggressive and unpredictable, so sorry for the blurry pic! I couldn’t get too close.
How you want your letter signed:  Agatha

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Agatha,
This is a Robber Fly, not a Wasp, and it appears to be
Laphria astur, based on this BugGuide image.  Large Robber Flies are aerial predators that take prey on the wing, and the “mid-air tumble” you witnessed might have been a failed attempt to capture a meal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tiger Bee Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  BuTyler Pennsylvania  (Butler???)
Date: 08/24/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is it normal to see a tiger bee fly in north western pennsylvania?  I have never seen one before
How you want your letter signed:  Rob Och

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Rob,
We suspect your sighting was in Butler, Pennsylvania, not BuTyler.  According to BugGuide data, the Tiger Bee Fly ranges over most of eastern North America, including BuTyler, Pennsylvania.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination