Currently viewing the category: "Flies"

Subject:  Kind of bug
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 09/01/2021
Time: 07:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Judy curious what this id
How you want your letter signed:  Thank tip

Giant Robber Fly

This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus Promachus.  You may read about the group on BugGuide where it states:  “Large robber flies with tiger-stripe pattern on abdomen.”  It might be a Red Footed Cannibalfly, though your individual appears to have fewer stripes on the abdomen.

Subject:  Found a Belvosia
Geographic location of the bug:  Burnham Maine, Waldo County
Date: 08/28/2021
Time: 01:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Finally I was pruning one of my flowering bushes and my daughter and I came across this huge fly but it looks like a bee I’m like it looks like a crossbreed between a fly and a bee and she said yeah it does so I looked it up because I have Google lens on my phone and it said it was a Belvosia and then I found some articles stating that they’ve also been sighted in Clinton and Fairfield Maine which I lived in Clinton too so I wanted to submit a few pictures that I took to you
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbie Jean

Tachinid Fly

Dear Bobbie Jean,
Congratulations on successfully identifying your Tachinid Fly in the genus
Belvosia.  Thank you also for submitting your excellent images.  According to BugGuide they feed on Lepidoptera.  The female Tachinid lays her eggs on a caterpillar and the fly larvae parasitize the caterpillar.

Tachinid Fly

Subject:  Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Paignton , Devon
Date: 08/23/2021
Time: 07:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Cannot identify what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Eric newnham

Hover Fly

Dear Eric,
This is not a wasp.  It is a True Fly, more specifically a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae.  We have identified it as
Volucella zonaria on Nature Spot where it states:  “This is a hornet mimic and is one of our largest and most spectacular hoverflies which can be recognised by its yellow and black banded abdomen” and “This species became established in Britain in the 1940s and until recently it had very much a southerly distribution with most records coming from south of a line from the Severn Estuary to The Wash, however it seems to be expanding its range and is now quite frequently recorded further north.”  It is also pictured on British Naturalists’ Association.

 

Subject:  Unknown bee
Geographic location of the bug:  Las Vegas NEvada
Date: 08/19/2021
Time: 08:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please help me identify this bee?
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Dr. Merkler

Bee Killer

Dear Dr. Merkler,
This is not a Bee, but rather a predatory Robber Fly known as a Bee Killer,
Mallophora fautrix.

Bee Killer

Daniel,
I think in the back recesses if my mind, I knew this (once upon a time!).  Thank you so much!!
Dr. M

We are so happy we were able to refresh your memory.

Subject:  This insect was in my garden
Geographic location of the bug:  North down Northern Ireland
Date: 08/15/2021
Time: 12:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I’m usually quick good at figuring out the garden wildlife but couldn’t figure This one
How you want your letter signed:  With thanks Lianne

Migrant Hover Fly

Dear Lianne,
We turned to NatureSpot to identify your female Migrant Hover Fly,
Eupeodes corollae, and according to NatureSpot:  “It is a common species, its numbers in Britain often boosted by migration.”

Oh that’s so good thank you so much for the quick response.
I’ll have a read up now
Lianne Rea

Subject: Type of Robber Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Asheville, NC (WNC)
Date: 08/14/2021
Time: 04:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this one floating in the kiddie pool. It’s about 2″ long. Can you identify it for me, please and thanks?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in WNC

Giant Robber Fly

Dear Curious in WNC,
This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus Promachus, and based on images posted to BugGuide, we believe it might be
Promachus hinei.  There appears to be a wing near the Giant Robber Flies legs that does not belong to the Giant Robber Fly.  We suspect it might have caught prey just before falling into your pool and drowning.