Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee/Wasp?
Location: San Antonio, TX
April 26, 2015 6:41 pm
I cannot for the life of me figure out what this is! please please help!
Signature: Thanks, Hannah Ervin

Belzebul Bee Eater

Belzebul Bee Eater

Dear Hannah,
This is one of the largest and most impressive of the North American Robber Flies in the family Asilidae.  This is a Belzebul Bee-Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, which you can verify by comparing your image to this image on BugGuide.

Belzebul Bee-Eater

Belzebul Bee-Eater

THANK YOU SO MUCH! I was looking on bugguide.net all day, but I was looking for a type of bee not a bee killer haha! I appreciate your help very much! God bless!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect identification
Location: central New Jersey
April 22, 2015 7:38 am
I live in New Jersey and I want to know the name of an insect with a skinny body and black and white striped legs. The legs look as if they are lit up
Signature: Don’t Bug me!

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

This distinctive Crane Fly is commonly called a Phantom Crane Fly, a name that refers to the appearing and disappearing act that occurs when it flies feebly from sun to shade, an optical illusion created because of the boldly striped legs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a bee or not a bee; that is the question…
Location: Northern England
April 20, 2015 9:11 am
Sorry – couldn’t resist! This little fellow was alongside a bumble bee on my muscari this morning and I managed to get two photos. I can’t remember seeing one before. Please help 🙂
Many thanks
Signature: regards, Heather Cahill

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Heather,
This is NOT a Bee, but rather, a Greater Bee Fly, a harmless pollinating insect.  Flies have a single pair of wings while other flying insects have two pairs of wings.

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Do you know what this bug is?
Location: Chester England UK
April 19, 2015 7:44 am
Found on doorstep have posted on Facebook but none of my friends recognise it.
Signature: Karen

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Karen,
This is a Greater Bee Fly, a harmless pollinating insect that is found in North America as well as Europe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect identification
Location: Pacific Northwest, Southwest Washington state
April 11, 2015 11:21 am
Hello,
I live in a wooded area of southwest Washington state and saw this insect on the door of our shed. I tried to look up something on it, but can’t seem to find anything. You you please help?
Thank you
Signature: Tia Miller

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

Dear Tia,
This distinctive insect is a Tiger Crane Fly,
Phoroctenia vittata angustipennis.  As it does not sting nor bite, it is a harmless insect.

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of insect is this?
Location: Wesley Chapel, Florida
April 11, 2015 7:42 am
Hello Bugman,
I have a butterfly garden in Florida and have found many strange insects but cannot figure out what this little guy is.
Any information is much appreciated!
Signature: Michele M.

Male Horse Fly: Chlorotabanus crepuscularis

Male Horse Fly: Chlorotabanus crepuscularis

Dear Michele,
This is really a gorgeous image of a male Horse Fly. We verified its identity as
Chlorotabanus crepuscularis on BugGuide where it states: “Females feed on mammalian blood.  …  As with all the blood-feeding tabanids, the females are responsive to Carbon Dioxide. I caught over 500 females in one night with a trap baited with dry ice in coastal South Carolina. Will also come to lights at night.  Regarded as a pest species in Florida.”  The closeness of the eyes indicates that this is a non-biting male Horse Fly.  Female Horse Flies have a space between the eyes.

Wow!  A horse fly!
I never would have guessed!
I love insects and never use pesticides.  I just love seeing their beauty up close.
Amazing!!!
Thanks so much for your speedy answer and expertise,
Michele Mistretta

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination