Currently viewing the category: "Mydas Flies"
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Subject: Blue winged insect
Location: Niagara area, Southern Ontario
July 3, 2012 1:11 pm
I live in the Niagara area of Southern Ontario and found this guy in my garden. It is just over an inch long and the wing is almost 3/4 of an inch. Any idea what it is?
Signature: P.Skinner

Mydas Fly

Dear P. Skinner,
The wings of this Mydas Fly are reflecting the beautiful color of the sky.  The wings are not actually that blue, but the dark surface is perfect for enhancing the saturation of the colors reflected in them.

Thank you so much for identifying this guy for me. I have never seen one before and he was beautiful. Thanks also for featuring him as ‘bug of the month’. Very cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Oxford, NC
June 22, 2012 12:50 pm
Hi,
I am hoping you can help me identify this insect. I don’t think I have ever seen these before. It looks similar to a peach tree borer moth, but I don’t think their behavior makes sense if that is what they are. I have been watching several of these flying around an area where I have spreading chipped wood mulch. They appear to be laying eggs in the mulch, and there are no peach trees around at all. Thanks for any help.
Signature: Dan

Mydas Fly

Hi Dan,
It is interesting that you have compared this Mydas Fly to a Peach Tree Borer because both insects are wasp mimics.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are laid singly in soil or rotting wood. (See video of oviposition–Flickr). Mydas larvae prey on beetle larvae, esp. those of June beetles. Larvae pupate close to soil (or wood?) surface. Adults are active only in mid-summer.”

Thanks very much!  That is definitely it.  I hope they also prey on Japanese beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mydas vs. hornet
Location: Northern Indiana
August 25, 2011 10:21 am
This is not an ID request, but thought that other WTB addicts might appreciate it. This picture is not great quality, but here’s a link to the full video of a hornet attacking and decapitating a golden-legged mydas fly:
http://www.facebook.com/rumvillage#!/video/video.php?v=207796845940579&oid=116718851680137&comments
Signature: Vince

Bald Faced Hornet decapitates Gold Legged Mydas Fly

Hi Vince,
We were unsuccessful in locating a Golden Legged Mydas Fly online, but we did find
Mydas tibialis on BugGuide.  It is a species with no common name listed and it has been reported from Indiana.  Your Food Chain image is wonderful.  We wonder if the best Hornet hunters decapitate large and dangerous prey like Dragonflies, and then they communicate to the hive where to find the kill.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating Wasps
Location: Royal Oak, Michigan
July 25, 2011 6:19 pm
Dear Bugman,
Over the past couple of weeks (beginning mid-July) this guy has been seen flying around the yard and never let me approach closely enough for a photo. Until he became preoccupied… It becomes startled easily, but sits for long periods of time on the mulch in my garden, rarely landing on the plants. It’s about 1.5” long. It resembles some of the spider wasps or wood wasps, but I was a little overwhelmed trying to identify it myself. Thanks!
Signature: DaleShannon

Mating Mydas Flies

Hi Dale,
These mating Mydas Flies,
Mydas clavatus, are excellent wasp mimics.  You may read more about them on bugguide, where it is indicated:  “Mating system in this species unknown. Different Mydas species apparently have different mating systems, including resource-defense polygyny and ‘hilltopping’.”  BugGuide does have at least one image of a mating pair.

Mydas Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Massive Black Winged Thing
Location: South West Michigan
July 13, 2011 9:53 pm
This afternoon (July 13th) I was sitting outside around 4 pm when this really big insect landed on the mint in my garden. I thought it looked wasp-like on top, but the bottom looks more dragonfly-ish. It flew off after a bit and when it came towards me I ran. In my defence; it was over an inch long and looks rather badass.
I’ve asked several people but nobody knows! Any ideas? Thank you!
Signature: Erica

Mydas Fly

Hi Erica,
The Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, is actually a true Fly, though it does mimic certain wasps as a defense mechanism.  It does not bite or sting, and despite its large size and fierce appearance, it is perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this bug?
Location: Lake Texoma, Oklahoma
June 28, 2011 10:41 pm
My son took this picture of this bug on the shores of Lake Texoma, on the Oklahoma side, the weekend of June 25 of this year.
It’s rather large, maybe 2in. long and flies.
I cannot find it in your extensive library, which is impressive and very helpful.I wasn’t even sure what ”type” of insect to start the search. Didn’t find it under ”wasps” or ”bees” or ”flies”.
Help!
Signature: A. Gordon

Mydas Fly

Dear A. Gordon,
We admit that our vast archive can be quite daunting if you don’t know where to start.  This is a Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, and it is an excellent mimic of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae.  Once we lightened your photo a bit, the detail in the head and body was really revealed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination