Currently viewing the category: "Mydas Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fallsburg, Ohio
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 08:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend asked for my help in identifying this insect. I’m not sure what it is and I’m curious as well because I saw one last week in Pataskala, Ohio. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  However

Mating Mydas Flies

These mating Mydas Flies are identified as Mydas tibialis on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Maybe a flower wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Rural Northwest Tennessee, USA
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 08:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This large wasp is trapped in my screen porch.  I usually relocate insects that get caught back outside, but this one is acutely aware of my approach. I think it is some kind of flower wasp, but I am unsure if it has the ability to sting.  I know that usually female flower wasps are flightless and the males can fly.  I don’t want to mess with it if I’m likely to get stung as it is far to aware of my attempts so far.   Any thoughts?
How you want your letter signed:  Jess

Mydas Fly

Dear Jess,
This is not a Flower Wasp, or any kind of wasp for that matter, but rather, a harmless Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, that benefits from mimicking a stinging wasp.  According to BugGuide:  “Large black fly with red/orange mark on top (dorsum) of 2nd abdominal segment. Body hairless, cylindrical. Eyes large. Antennae are distinctively clubbed in the Mydidae. This species flies rather boldly in the open. With the black-and-orange pattern, it resembles a wasp and fools the casual observer” and “Batesian mimic of certain spider wasps (Pompilidae).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a dirt dauber or a wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Shreveport, La
Date: 07/09/2018
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These have been tunneling in our yard and under the foundation of our house. We can’t figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks for the help

Mydas Fly

This is not a Wasp.  It is a Mydas Fly and it is an effective wasp mimic.  We believe we have correctly identified your Mydas Fly as Mydas chrysostomus thanks to this BugGuide image.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Life cycle details not known for many groups; generally, larvae live in decaying wood or soil; some known to prey on beetle larvae” and that should explain why they are tunneling in your yard.  Mydas Flies are harmless, so you have no cause for concern.

Mydas Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hornet?
Geographic location of the bug:  Greenville, SC
Date: 07/03/2018
Time: 03:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It looks like a very large beetle with a bee’s abdomen, about 2″ long. Wings are purple – ish.
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Gerri Johnston

Mydas Fly

Dear Gerri,
This is not a Hornet.  It is a Fly, and because of the clubbed antennae and the orange band on the abdomen, we are pretty confident it is a Mydas Fly, most likely
Mydas clavatus.  According to BugGuide:  “With the black-and-orange pattern, it resembles a wasp and fools the casual observer.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Browns Mills, New Jersey
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I just would like to know what kind of bug this is, tried to search myself but no exact match.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Holly.

Mydas Fly

Dear Holly,
This is a Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, and it is generally believed that this harmless species mimics stinging wasps for protection.  While this mimicry will work on many predators, it does not work with humans that have a morbid and irrational fear of wasps.  This individual does not appear to have met a natural death.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Peoria AZ
August 15, 2017 9:56 am
Hi I am trying to figure out what type of insect this is, we have had several of them in and around our pool.
Signature: Thanks Lora

Mydas Fly

Dear Lora,
Your image is quite blurry, but we believe we have identified this Fly with an orange abdomen as the Mydas Fly
Stratiomydas lividus based on this BugGuide image.  Of the genus, BugGuide states:  “A single species in our area” and it has a range of “AZ to Costa Rica + Peru.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination