Currently viewing the category: "Mydas Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Pinon Hills, CA
June 22, 2017 5:13 pm
Southern California High Desert against the foothills of Mt. High. June 22, 2017 at around 1pm. I have narrowed it down but am confused and cannot find an exact match to what it is. I have attached pics. Please help. If it’s a mosquito it looks horrendous.
Thank you,
Signature: Tim

Mydas Fly: Rhaphiomidas acton

Dear Tim,
At first we thought this must be a Bee Fly, but we believe we have correctly identified it as a Mydas Fly,
Rhaphiomidas acton, thanks to images on BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide indicates the habitat is:  “Sandy habitats in relatively arid locales.”  Your individual appears to be a female, and we found this image of a male on FlickR.  There is also an amazing image of the emergence from the pupa on BugGuide.

Mydas Fly: Rhaphiomidas acton

Mydas Fly: Rhaphiomidas acton

Mydas Fly: Rhaphiomidas acton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Birdbath victim?
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 3:44 am
I’m a long-time reader and fan. I’m sorry the photos aren’t any better, but can you tell me what this lovely critter is? I saw it crawling around my birdbath before sunup this morning (June 12). When it got lighter and I went out to see if it was still there, the poor thing was *in* the birdbath. I fished it out, took photos, and then put the bug in a sort of hidden place on the ground so it can revive before a bird eats it (assuming it didn’t drown).
Thanks so much for your website. It’s a constant source of wonder to me.
Signature: Laurel

Mydas Fly

Subject: Birdbath victim part 2
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 4:00 am
Is it mydas clavatus?
I’m happy to report that I just went out to check on this little critter, and it is alive! It has dried out enough to pull its wings in. So I don’t see the orange spot now, but I do see pretty iridescent wings covering it.
Signature: Laurel

Dear Laurel,
We apologize for the delay in responding.  We were away from the office for nearly two weeks and we are attempting to respond to as much unanswered mail as possible (an impossible task) and posting the best letters.  This Mydas Fly is indeed
Mydas clavatus, and your intervention in its life warrants tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?!
Location: Warsaw, IN. Northern Indiana close to the country.
July 19, 2016 12:52 pm
we found this on our grill when we were watering our plants & we are dumbfounded by what kind of bug this is.. thank you!
Signature: Britney England

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Britney,
We believe we have correctly identified your Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae as
Mydas tibialis which is described on BugGuide as:  “Black body, smoky wings, brown legs.”  BugGuide describes the harmless members of this family as being:  “Large flies, often wasp mimics. Have prominent, clubbed antennae and distinctive wing venation.”  Though they mimic wasps, Mydas Flies neither sting nor bite and they pose no threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: wasp? bee? hornet?
Location: Whitewater, California
June 7, 2016 10:02 am
Hello!
My kids and I normally play bee rescue in our pool. We live just outside Palm Springs, CA so there is not much water just laying about so bees love our pool, sadly a lot of them hit the water and almost drown so we will fish them out and let them dry off before they decide to go on their way.
However, the other day after lunch we found this poor thing in the pool, we didn’t get to it in time since we were in the house.
Although, I am a bit nervous as to what it is because it was so much bigger! It was about 1 1/2 -2 inches long!! Huge compared to our little bees. Can you tell me if this one is safe to save and what it is? I have looked through your site and can’t find anything like it.
Thank you so much for your help!!
Signature: Cristena

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly genus Opomydas

Dear Christena,
None of the above.  This is a Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae, but it does not look like any species we have seen.  We cannot even locate a conclusive match on BugGuide,
but our best guess is that it is in the genus Nemomydas like this unidentified species on BugGuide or this Nemomydas venosus also pictured on BugGuide.  Neither image looks exact, but they are close enough for us to guess your individual is closely related.  According to BugGuide, Mydas Flies are:  “Large flies, often wasp mimics. Have prominent, clubbed antennae and distinctive wing venation” and to the best of our knowledge, they are perfectly harmless.  As an aside, it is not possible to make out the head of the Mydas Fly in your image as it is partially obscured by the wings and body of a smaller fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BODYOFAGRASSHOPPER
Location: Elizabethton, Tennessee
July 18, 2015 4:33 pm
We have spent 5 hours trying to figure out what the heck this is please help!!!!!!
Signature: Jeniffer Carver

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Jeniffer,
This very effective wasp mimic is actually a harmless Mydas Fly,
Mydas tibialis, and you can verify our identification on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or fly????
Location: Cape Coral, FL
June 1, 2015 7:51 am
Found this on the porch yesterday. It’s at least an inch long and doesn’t appear to have a stinger. We live in SW Florida by the Caloosahatchee River. It was found in the middle of the afternoon. I’ve tried to ID it, but can’t find exactly what it is. But everything leads me to some sort of fly…but man does it look waspy. Please help, want to make sure it’s not dangerous. Thanks.
Signature: Jessica

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Jessica,
This harmless Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae is a magnificent insect, and many of the members of the family mimic wasps as a defense since the flies do not sting, but they benefit from resembling stinging insects.  We believe we have correctly identified your Mydas Fly as
Phyllomydas parvulus based on images posted to BugGuide.  The Beautiful Wildlife Garden site has some great images and information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination