Currently viewing the category: "Maggots and Puparia"

Subject:  Bugs? on sanitary napkins
Geographic location of the bug:  India, in a semi humid to dry enviornment, near bloo
Date: 11/04/2021
Time: 02:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
This is going to be a bit disgusting, graphic and tmi.
I had a lot of very bad weeks in terms of mental illness and as a result of that, I accumulated bloody disposable sanitary pads.
Yes I know what a bad idea that is. I managed to clean and sanitize all of my pad shelf today (yay)
There were insects on it. (Not insects since they did not have legs but maybe to-be insects since maybe they were early stages).
They’re small about 2mm, gathered in groups, white to brown coloured, their body is sectioned, no feet, can’t distinguish any features and they were all dead or immobile at least. I collected them and sprayed the whole thing with sanitizer, is there something else you’d recommend doing?
Do you know what it might have been?
How you want your letter signed:  A harangued person

Puparia on Sanitary Napkin

Dear harangued person,
This appears to be a fly pupa, commonly called puparia.  Fly larvae known as Maggots feed on a multitude of different foods, and many species of flies are associated with rotting organic matter.  When the maggots have finished feeding, they often wander away from the food source to transform into the puparia.  The insects you described:  “They’re small about 2mm, gathered in groups, white to brown coloured, their body is sectioned, no feet, can’t distinguish any features and they were all dead or immobile at least” sound very much like maggots.  So, if it is any comfort, the puparia did not emerge from the sanitary napkin, but rather the sanitary napkin seemed like a dry, comfortable place for metamorphosis.

Puparia on Sanitary Napkin

Subject:  Psychodidae larvae
Geographic location of the bug:  Riudeboix creek (UTM: 41.81305 2.34131), Collformic, el Brull, Catalonia-Spain
Date: 10/20/2021
Time: 11:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
This larvae was sampled in Riudeboix creek (UTM: 41.81305 2.34131), Collformic, el Brull, Catalonia-Spain on May 9, 2019.
Since then it has been preserved in alcohol 70%.
Can anyone help with the genus ID?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  iraima

Suspected Psychodidae Larva

Dear Iraima,
The editorial staff at What’s That Bug? does not have the necessary expertise to answer your question, however, we can post your images and enlist our readership to assist.  We would urge you to post a comment to this posting so people can contact you directly through our comment section.

Suspected Psychodidae Larva (detail)

Suspected Psychodidae Larva (detail)

Subject:  Interesting little guy
Geographic location of the bug:  Ashland, Virginia, USA
Date: 09/10/2021
Time: 05:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy in a shallow puddle. It was interesting how it flung it’s back end to “swim”.
How you want your letter signed:  Sgt_M

Horse Fly Larva

Dear Sgt_M,
This is a Horse Fly Larva.  Many species of Horse Flies have aquatic larvae.

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oxfordshire, UK
Date: 09/04/2021
Time: 06:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My friend’s son found this wee fella today (4th September 2021) near a boggy marsh in rural Oxfordshire, UK. We have no idea what it might be and wondered if you could help?
How you want your letter signed:  Sonja

Horse Fly Larva

Dear Sonja,
This sure looks like a Horse Fly larva to us, and we have received numerous reports this summer of Dark Giant Horse Flies from the UK here, and here, so it makes sense that this is the larva of a Dark Giant Horse Fly.

Subject:  Found in a creek water fall???
Geographic location of the bug:  Folsom, California (summer)r
Date: 06/18/2021
Time: 04:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  OMG! Founds this in a creek while camping in Folsom and it looks like some horror movie leech! Please know what thos is s I I can breath easy and be able to go back in the water here.
How you want your letter signed:  Sicerly, Michael Del Carlo

Leather Jacket

Dear Michael,
This sure looks to us like the larva of a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae, and you can compare your individual to images posted to Trout Nut, an anglers’ website.  Here is a BugGuide image.  We first read the common name Leather Jacket for Crane Fly larvae in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin by Charles Hogue.  Though it somewhat resembles the “graboids” from Tremors (see Monster Legacy) we assure you the Crane Fly larva is perfectly harmless.

Subject:  What can be this “larva”?
Geographic location of the bug:  Madrid city, NE
Date: 03/28/2021
Time: 01:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There are lots of this larva (I think that it is a larva, but not sure, perhaps a chrysalis) at my parents flat roof. Many of them near to an open box with compost. Some of them looks alive, some of them are “emtpy”. It is the first time that something like that appears there.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Chris,
These are Black Soldier Fly larvae and they are often found in compost piles.  They are harmless and are actually considered beneficial as they help to break down the organic materials in the compost pile.