Currently viewing the category: "Maggots and Puparia"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Bathroom
July 10, 2017 3:04 am
Over the last couple of days I found two of these in the bath tub now another one on bathroom rug. I have scowerd the internet trying to identify this as would like to understand where it could be coming from. It has no legs. I’d be surprised if they entering through the high up bathroom window. Then I thought they coming through plug hole… but now I find one on the floor I’m not so sure. Would love to know if you can help. Many thanks. Jelena
Signature: Jels

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Jels,
The identification is easy, but your other theoretical questions are not quite as easy.  This is a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly, and according to BugGuide:  “larvae of most feed on decaying organic debris. They are filter feeders in different kinds of aquatic media. They purify water by filtering microorganisms and other products.”  Since we don’t know where your bathroom is located:  on the 37th floor of a high rise, in a basement, in Singapore or in New York, speculating on the point of entry is questionable, but we suspect they are breeding in your drain.  If you are connected to a septic tank, this is even more likely.  We suspect these Rat-Tailed Maggots are now seeking a drier environment so they can initiate pupation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blood worms
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 1, 2017 9:18 pm
Though it might make us unpopular with the neighbors, we keep standing water in the yard for wildlife, and we skim with a net daily to feed Mosquito Larvae to the Angelfish, and Boris is still thriving alone in his tank since killing Medea Luna several years ago.  This week the Mosquito Larvae have been replaced by Blood Worms, the larvae of non-biting Midges, and Boris has been greedily eating everyone put in the tank.

Blood Worms

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this Botfly larvae
Location: South padre island
April 2, 2017 4:40 pm
Please help identify
Signature: Vivian

Black Soldier Fly Pupa

Dear Vivian,
This is definitely an immature phase of a Fly in the order Diptera, and we do not believe it is a Bot Fly.  We needed to research that South Padre Island is in Texas.  We suspect this might be a Black Soldier Fly pupa.  Was it found near a compost pile? 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found this in a bedroom
Location: Braintree, Essex, England
December 16, 2016 3:23 am
Would really appreciate your help. My daughter found this in her bedroom and having looked at a few websites I have no idea what it is.
Signature: Thanks, Neil

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Dear Neil,
This thing reminds us of a Bot Fly larva, but we have never seen an image of a Bot Fly larva with spiny projections along its body.  We will do additional research and get back to you.  It is possible it gained entrance to your daughter’s bedroom because of a family pet.

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Thank you for tour prompt email.
I hope you have luck finding it, one thing that may help is that we don’t have family pets other than guinea pigs but they live outside.
Thanks again for your help, its much appreciated
Neil

Many Bot Flies are endoparasites on rodents, so the Guinea Pigs may be playing host.

Eric Eaton provides a correction:  Little House Fly Larva
Daniel:
Pretty certain the fly larva is Fannia sp., family Fanniidae.  They used to be in the Muscidae, but are now in their own family.  Known as “Little House Flies.”  Hm-m-m, I may have to do more digging, but the “habitat” would sure fit for that, too.
… I’d like permission to use the Fannia larva images so I can do a blog post.  I found an adult here in Colorado Springs just a couple weeks ago.  I’m attaching an image, in fact.
Happy holidays, safe travels!
Cheers,
Eric

Little House Fly (courtesy of Eric Eaton)

Little House Fly (courtesy of Eric Eaton)

Hi Daniel,
I have attached both images I took as my phone doesn’t keep a record of emails sent for some strange reason.
I am more than happy for him to use the images I did have a look on line at the one he thinks it is and it does look similar other than the one online mentioned 5-8 mm and a black head, I think you can see from the images this was approx 15mm and didnt have a black head. ..
TBH Im more concerned about if its dangerous, how and why it was in my daughter’s bedroom and to stop it happening again.
Thanks again for all your help
Neil

Presumably Little House Fly Larva

Presumably Little House Fly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pods
Location: Southern CA (Murrieta CA)
October 9, 2016 7:47 am
Hello, I need help identifying what these little pods are. At first glance they seem to be mouse poop but when you get close you can see that they are medium/light brown in color and have segmenting lines. I’m wondering if they are some sort of larva or droppings from some kind of animal
Signature: ?

Fly Puparia

Fly Puparia

Thank you for resubmitting your request using our standard submission form.  We now know where this sighting occurred, but you still did not provide much clarification on where in Murrieta, California you found them.  Were they in the house?  Were they in the garbage can?  These are the puparia of a Fly.  We suspect they were probably found in association with decaying plant or animal matter.  Many Flies are attracted to putrefaction, and lay their eggs on decaying organic matter found in garbage.  The eggs hatch into maggots that eventually transform into puparia.  Adult Flies will emerge.

Fly Puparia

Fly Puparia

Sorry I was not clear! So I actually found them all over my carpet along the baseboards in various rooms. They room that i found the most of them in has no food, plants, or animals in it. They are spread throughout the whole first floor of my house which the first floor alone is about 2200 sq ft. How can these be all throughout my carpet If there is not decaying plant or animal matter? What is the best way to get rid of these and prevent future ones from forming? My house is pretty clean. I do have a dog that goes outside but lives mostly inside. I vacuumed up all that I could see

We don’t want to make you paranoid, but if they did not come from a garbage can that was not emptied in a timely manner, they might have come from a dead animal inside your walls.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grubs found in rotting wood of coral tree
Location: Los Angeles
August 19, 2016 9:30 am
Good morning, Bugman.
We discovered today a large area of rot on the base of our coral tree. Excavating the rot, I found several communities of this grub pictured. The animals seemed at first not to move at all, but after some time, it became evident that they do move, very slowly.
I am inclined to believe that they are taking advantage of the rotted wood, and are not the cause of it.
They were surely not expecting this sudden exposure!
Can you identify them?
Signature: Swami M

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Swami,
We are nearly certain these are Black Soldier Fly larvae,
Hermetia illucens, which you may find pictured on BugGuide.  Black Soldier Fly larvae are frequently found in compost piles, where they are beneficial as they aid in decomposition.  According to BugGuide:  “Commercially distributed for composting” and “Larvae live in compost, dung, rotting vegetation.”

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Om
Dear Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me. Yes, I agree the larvae match the images of Black Soldier Fly larvae on your website.
I am hoping we can save our tree; it seems to be infected with some kind of rot that turns the wood right under the bark to mush. Apparently these larvae love it, as there are quite a few.
Best wishes,
Mahayogananda
ps I’m at the Vedanta Society in Hollywood

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination