Currently viewing the category: "Long Legged Flies"
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Subject:  What’s on my Woody Plant?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 20, 2017 12:30 pm
Dear Bugman,
I try to keep abreast of what I am finding on my woody plants, and you have provided such excellent information in the past.  Please help me identify this metallic green insect.  It moved about very warily, and getting a photo was not easy.  Thanks for any assistance you are able to provide.
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Long Legged Fly

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, and based on the Natural History of Orange County site, we believe it is
Condylostylus longicornis.  The species is also pictured on BugGuide where it states the range is:  “California; North Carolina to Paraguay; Polyensia. Possibly the most widespread species of the genus.”  Of the family, BugGuide indicates:  “Mouthparts are for piercing (with a short proboscis). Adults and larvae prey on small insects.”  This is a beneficial predator that will help keep your plants free of Aphids and other small insects that are injurious to garden plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Regina, Sask., Canada
September 6, 2015 5:51 pm
need your hep to i.d this fly. Surprised to find it on my hydrangea. Suspect it may be a hover fly, but have never seen one here in Saskatchewan, Canada.
Signature: Geo McBride

Long Legged Fly

Long Legged Fly

Dear Geo,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, and it looks very close to a member of the genus
Condylostylus which is well represented on BugGuide.

Long Legged Fly

Long Legged Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: South Africa
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
September 25, 2012 2:36 pm
Hello Daniel
I have tried to Google and find out what this one is. Bu with little success. A friend told me she thinks it’s a horsefly. I Google orange horsefly but did not find anything like this. Although it does look a lot like some of them. Is it just a different type of horsefly?
Sorry about the little pic.. once again. Can only get so close with my mobile:-)
Signature: rob

Possibly Longlegged Fly

Hi Rob,
We believe this might be a Longlegged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae.  It is not a Horse Fly.  According to Bugguide which covers only North American species, Longlegged Flies:  “vary in appearance and biology. Adults are medium to small slender flies normally with green, blue or copper metallic colored bodies and long legs. Their wings are clear or marked with darker areas towards the wing tips. Wing venation is characteristic.”

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Foodchain, Spider and Fly
Location: Queensland. Australia
October 29, 2011 9:58 pm
Hi guys,
Thought you might like this picture for your food chain pages. A tiny immature Dolomedes Instabilis has caught itself an Austrosciapus connexus, one of the Long Legged Flys. The fly is about 6mm long.
Signature: Aussietrev

Water Spider eats Long Legged Fly

Hi Trevor,
We greatly appreciate that you take the time to identify your creatures prior to submitting photos, which makes posting your submissions so easy.  According to the Find a Spider Guide for the Spiders of Southern Queensland website,
Dolomedes instabilis is commonly called a Water Spider and their habitat is  “On the surface of still-water ponds; this spider has the ability to run on water surfaces and to form underwater retreats in large air bubbles, although some pisaurids make their webs in green leaves or small twigs of shrubs and may never have occasion to ‘walk on water.'”  The Brisbane Insect website has some wonderful photos and indicates the common name is Fishing Spider like its North American relatives.  The Brisbane Insect website also indicates the common name of Austrosciapus connexus is the Green Long Legged Fly.

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Long-legged fly (Condylostylus sipho?)
Location: Naperville, IL
June 26, 2011 7:38 am
Dear Daniel~
I found this long-legged fly on a hydrangea leaf today. Although I am pretty sure it is of the genus Condylostylus, I am less certain of its species. Condylostylus longicornis wings are unmarked, and its legs are blacker. Condylostylus sipho has the wing markings of this specimen, as well as its yellow upper legs, but the body shape is different. So sorry to trouble you again, but I thought this was a really beautiful fly, and I understand they are predators of even smaller insects. Their legs resemble mosquitoes! Thank you very much!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Long Legged Fly

Hi Dori,
Even though we cannot confirm for certain your exact species, we are thrilled to be able to post these excellent photos of a Long Legged Fly.

Long Legged Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

INSECT HUMANITARIAN OF THE WEEK:  ANNA
Small Fly – Can you help, Daniel?
Location: Hawthorne, California
May 28, 2011 9:55 pm
Hi Daniel,
I fished this little guy out of the bird bath the other day and managed to get a semi-decent shot of it while it was recovering. Do you know what type fly it is?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Long Legged Fly from Hawthorne California

Hi Anna,
Daniel would really like to use this photo in a powerpoint presentation on Southern California Flies.  It is a LongLegged Fly in the genus
Condylostylus which is well represented on BugGuideHere is some information from  BugGuide which tends to indicate that this is a beneficial genus of Flies:  “Food Mouthparts are for piercing (with a short proboscis). Adults and larvae prey on small insects; larvae of some species mine stems of grasses and other plants or live under bark
Life Cycle Larvae develop in wet to dry soil and pupate in cocoons made up of soil particles cemented together. Adults mate after elaborate and unique behavior, involving the males displaying their legs to the female.

Hi,
Of course it will be fine to use any of my photos in the powerpoint presentation.  I’m honored that you asked.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination