Currently viewing the category: "Horse Flies and Deer Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Cootamundra, NSW. Australia
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 12:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Wanting to know what sort of fly this is? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Graham

Horse Fly or Bee Fly???

Dear Graham,
Our initial thought is this must be a Horse Fly (called March Flies in Australia) from the family Tabanidae, but there are no similar looking images on the Brisbane Insects site.  The white edge on the compound eye is a trait found in several Bee Flies on the Brisbane Insect site that share that trait.  We are going to request assistance from our readership with this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Fly-like insect.
Location: Central Connecticut
August 19, 2017 5:26 pm
Hello, just had this big critter buzz over my head as I opened my garage. It immediately landed on the garage door light and worked its way into the light cover essentially trapping itself. I’d estimate it to be around 1-3/4 inches in body length, easily over 2 inches to the wing tips. Appears very much like a huge fly. Quite a large sucker on it too. Seems to be excreting liquid from its rear as well. I’m located in central Connecticut and have been my whole 36 years. Have never seen a fly of this size. Just sharing my story. Hope its of interest to someone.
Signature: J. Perzan

Female Horse Fly

Dear J. Perzan,
This is a Horse Fly and you can tell by the space between the eyes that she is female.  Female Horse Flies are blood suckers, preying on livestock and large animals like deer, but if there is no preferred prey, they have been known to bite humans.  Unfortunately, we cannot see enough detail in your images to determine a species.

Female Horse Fly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it a fly or bee?
Location: Pierce County, Washington
August 9, 2017 7:42 pm
This bug is about 3/4 of an inch long. It like to fly in the window and play “where is the opening” until I help it out. It buzzes like a fly.
Signature: I don’t care

Female Horse Fly

This is a female Horse Fly, and we believe we have correctly identified it as Hybomitra captonis thanks to this BugGuide image.  Female Horse Flies are blood suckers, and they have been known to bite people if there is no livestock or other prey available.

Female Horse Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silly for not knowing…
Location: Carlisle, Cumbria
July 17, 2017 11:21 am
Hi please could you help me identify this beastie? He was about 2 inches and came home with me on my boot. I’d be most grateful. Thank you., Becky.
Signature: The bug

Female Dark Giant Horse Fly

This is a female Dark Giant Horse Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mosquito or fly
Location: shamong nj
July 10, 2017 9:42 am
was bitten by this bug several times – came home and about 12 hours later a welt appeared and itching badly. Woke me up from a dead sleep at 4am . what is it?
Signature: itchy

Deer Fly

Dear itchy,
This is a Deer Fly, and females are blood-sucking biters.

Thank you.  I felt the bites but a few family members did not but we all woke up with itchy feet in the middle of the night – so it started a debate as to what it was, I managed to kill one the next day and take a picture of it so we will know  how to treat the bites so it was effecting the family dogs also.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Female Dark Giant Horsefly?
Location: South West Wales
July 4, 2017 12:24 pm
Hi, found this insect on my window this morning, I’ve asked several friends to help identify it but the most likely contender seems to be the Dark Giant Horsefly and for it to be a female due to the band between the eyes. Would you agree?
Signature: Justin

Female Dark Giant Horsefly

Dear Justin,
We agree that this is a female Dark Giant Horsefly, though we do have one comment regarding the common name.  In North America, we reserve compound names using fly to refer to creatures that are not Flies, like Butterflies, Fireflies, Dobsonflies and Dragonflies, and the modifying naming strategy like Crane Flies, Fruit Flies and Flesh Flies, as well as Horse Flies, is used to identify true Flies in the order Diptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination