Currently viewing the category: "Fruit Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB?!
Location: Denver area (larva); east of Phoenix (Thrips & E. acutangulus)
December 12, 2016 10:37 pm
Hello,
I’m trying to positively identify three insects so their Genus species can be part of the file name which will have the Genus species of the flowering plant, too. (You’ll see.)
I’ll include all three images and note that I’m pretty sure I’ve tracked down the fruit fly name, Euarestoides acutangulus, though if you think otherwise, I’m all ears. Or, at least, eyes.
The (I think sawfly) larva is on a pincushion cactus blossom and might be two inches long? This is mid-May along the southern edge of the Denver area (Highland Ranch).
The Thrips is on a Mexican gold poppy, while the fruit fly is on a desert chicory. Both were shot in mid-March, east of Phoenix at about 2,100 feet elevation.
I appreciate your even taking the time to consider these.
Best,
Signature: Mark Bennett

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Dear Mark,
We are more than happy to attempt your identifications, but we do have several requests.  First, please confine any future submissions to a single species, with the only exceptions being closely related species observed at the same time, like two swallowtail butterflies visiting the same blossoms, or if there is a predator/prey relationship documented.  Multiple species not all observed at the same time or place does create problems for us in the archive process.  Also please include higher resolution images that are not cropped too tightly.  We are currently attempting to standardize the images on our site to 800 pixels wide by 550 pixels high at 72 dpi.  All your submitted images are considerably smaller and they are odd shaped crops.  We agree that your Fruit Fly is
Euarestoides acutangulus based on the wing patterns evident in several BugGuide images, but BugGuide has no information on the species, which is reported in Arizona.  It is also pictured on iNaturalist.  According to ResearchGate:  “Information on the life cycle of Euarestoides acutangulus (Thomson), including observations on feeding and reproductive behavior, is presented. The fly is bivoltine in central coastal California, with overwintering occurring as diapausing pupae. Eggs were laid in the staminate florets of the host plant, Ambrosia chamissonis (Lessing) Greene (Compositae), and hatched in 4 days. Larvae fed upon the anthers of unopened florets. The amount of damage caused to a staminate head depended upon the number of larvae reaching maturity and the number of florets within the head. Larvae generally completed development in 23 days. Pupation occurred among the destroyed florets. The pupal period of non-diapausing pupae required 12 days.”  The host plant, according to CalFlora, is ” a dicot, is a perennial herb that is native to California and is also found outside of California, but is confined to western North America.” 

Hello Daniel,
Here are the three images in their uncropped state. Note, these uncropped images are artwork to me, not science. As such, they are entered in competition at a gallery and could, with luck and the favor of the judges, be selected for display. And, with more luck and perseverance, become salable prints. THUS, please observe my copyright restrictions — you may use the images on your web site and archive, for educational purposes, but they can not be reproduced or shared or in any method used for commercial purposes by you, What’s That Bug?, or any other entity without my express permission. If these terms are acceptable, and accepted, then we’re good. If not, then please delete the attached file(s).
Thanks. I do hope these help the organization.
Mark
Mark Bennett Photography
markbennettphoto.com

Rafinesequia neomexicana blossom Euarestoides acutangulus fruit fly desert-chicory 20130316 10cc

Rafinesequia neomexicana blossom
Euarestoides acutangulus fruit fly
desert-chicory 20130316 10cc

Dear Mark,
Thanks for providing the higher resolution files.  Just so you know, the maximum size file we post is 800 pixels by 550 pixels at 72 dpi, so they will not be suitable for reproduction purposes should anyone download images from our site.  We do respect your wishes.  We occasionally allow images from our site to be used for non-profit, educational purposes, but we always request that the person requesting the use place a comment on the posting.  Since we are including a link to your site with the posting, people can contact you directly.  We will be cropping your high resolution images and moving your copyright information so it is embedded in the image.  Thanks again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentifiable fly
Location: Republic of Congo (Odzala NP)
July 7, 2016 1:42 am
For almost a year now I have been trying to identify this fly. Still, I have not found what species it is. My guess is that it belongs to the Ulidiidae, but I am not sure. Does anyone have an idea what species this fly could be? I photographed it in the Republic of the Congo
Signature: Daniel Nelson

Possibly Picture Winged Fly

Possibly Picture Winged Fly

Dear Daniel,
We agree that this could be a Picture Winged Fly in the family Ulidiidae, but we would seriously consider expanding the possibilities to include the superfamily Tephritoidea that includes Ulidiidae.  The perspective of your image, while quite artful, is not ideal for identification purposes if considered alone.  We once recall reading that four different views are helpful in identifying Robber Flies:  dorsal, lateral, head showing eyes and one other view that currently escapes our memory.  Alas, we cannot locate where we read that.  Furthermore, while quite pretty, many small flies do not command the same attention as large and showy butterflies, moths and beetles that are all much better represented on the internet.  Species from Africa are far less well documented on the internet than North American, Australian and British species.  We feel if you are only depending upon the internet, exact species identification based on this single image might not be possible.  With all that stated, we are posting your gorgeous image and we appeal to our readership to provide comments with any suggestions they may have.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what insec
Location: standerton, south africa
August 29, 2015 9:17 am
I have never seen this insect before, living in the same town for 30 years….
Signature: solene

PIcture Winged Fly

PIcture Winged Fly

Hi Solene,
This reminded us of a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, so we searched iSpot for South African species, and though we did not find an exact match, we did find several images that looked very similar, including this iSpot posting, though it is only identified to the family level.  The common name for the family in South Africa is Picture Winged Fly, but that same name is used on iSpot for the family Ulidiidae as well.  We are confident that in South Africa, Picture Winged Fly is an appropriate name for your individual, though we cannot say for certain to which family it belongs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s My Bug
Location: Colorado
July 3, 2015 6:48 pm
I photographed this little guy at a place called Crystal Lake, about 50 miles outside of Denver, Colorado. I really love his eyes. Can you tell me what he is please?
Signature: Ornithocheirus

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Dear Ornithocheirus,
Based on images posted to BugGuide, we have identified your Fruit Fly as a member of the genus
Paracantha, however the three species listed look remarkably similar and Colorado seems to be within the range of all three species, so we are reluctant to go further than identifying the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly?
Location: Watsonville, CA
June 11, 2015 2:33 am
Hey Bugman!
I have been finding large numbers of this mysterious (but beautiful) fly in my front yard… I’ve done a lot of internet research and cannot for the life of me figure it out… Is it a Robber Fly??? I have found them all of my Armenian Basket Flower and Artichoke… Please help! I need to know if it’s a pest or not.
Thanks,
Signature: Matt

Mating Artichoke Flies

Mating Artichoke Flies

Dear Matt,
These are most certainly not Robber Flies.  This is an introduced Artichoke Fly,
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly.  Your images of a single individual are both females, as evidenced by the long ovipositor, and the image with the three flies include two males that are attempting to mate.  Interestingly, bugGuide only has images of female Artichoke Flies, and they do not provide a common name.  There are many nice images on the Natural History of Orange County site.  As an introduced species, they may pose a threat to cultivated artichokes, but we have also found information that they use Milk Thistle, an introduced pest weed in California, as a host so the jury is still out if they are an agricultural pest or a biological control agent.

Artichoke Fly

Female Artichoke Fly

August 5, 2015
Hey Daniel,
Sorry for the delayed response – I saw and read this e-mail and had to do something else. I forgot to write you back to thank you, but I really was so impressed with your knowledge and how thorough your response was! Thank you so much – very informative. I really appreciate it.
Keep up the good work!
Thanks again,
Matt

Female Artichoke Fly

Female Artichoke Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Colorado
March 21, 2014 6:51 pm
Hi,
I have a couple of flies that I haven’t been able to identify.
The first I thought would be easy, however, I’m coming up empty! I’ve Googled lots of phrases, and gone through the photos on here (I think I hit them all), but didn’t see any matches. This one was in late June of 2010 in the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, CO.
The second and third are of the same insect. I believe is a picture-wing fly, but it could also be a fruit fly, as it’s a very tiny insect. This one was in late May of 2012 in Red Rocks in Morrison, CO.
Thank you so much for your help! (Also, your book is fabulous!)
Signature: Amy

Fruit Fly:  possibly Aciurina trixa

Fruit Fly: possibly Aciurina trixa

Hi Amy,
Thanks for the compliment and we are happy to hear you enjoyed The Curious World of Bugs.  We believe your second fly is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, not a Picture Winged Fly.  The closest match we were able to locate on BugGuide is the Bubble Gall Tephritid,
Aciurina trixa, though the pattern on the wings of the single individual posted to BugGuide is a bit different.  The photographer did make this note regarding an unpictured species in the same genus:  “This keyed to Aciurina bigeloviae in the excellent 1993 reference by Foote, Blanc, and Norrbom(1), and everything fit well (e.g. descriptions, wing diagram, location, host plant). Foote et al. mentioned that two other species had been synonymized with A. bigeloviae by Styeyskal in 1984, and that this was the most widespread and commonly encountered species of all the Chrysothamnus-feeding Aciurina…as well as the most variable. (In fact, the detailed synonymy and references for A. bigeloviae take up an entire page in their book!).”  So, we believe we have the genus correct, but the species remains questionable.  Your individual is a female based on the presence of the ovipositor.

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination