Currently viewing the category: "Fruit Flies"

Subject:  Sunflower Fruit Fly and immature California Mantis on Cannabis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/15/2021
Time: 09:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
As you know, we are having muggy weather in Los Angeles and the humidity seems to bring out more bugs.  My “girls” of 2021 are starting to show their stigmas and they are beginning to attract new insects.  I don’t have any identification requests for you today, but I wanted to submit a new photo of the pretty Fruit Fly you identified as Paracantha cultaris in 2019.  It is on a first generation plant (a genie) from a seed that I found on the Kernal Kush I grew last year.  The flies really like my Cannabis, and you assured me they will not harm my plants, and that they actually are associated with sunflowers which are always growing near the Cannabis.  I think it is sad that this pretty fly doesn’t have a common name and I would like to suggest Sunflower Fruit Fly.
I also eagerly await the appearance of immature California Mantids on my plants and I’m including an image of an inch long individual on my favorite strain Woodhead, and this is the fifth year I have grown plants descended from the original Woodhead I grew in 2017.  Once again, it is so nice to see you posting again.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Sunflower Fruit Fly

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for your kind words.  It is curious that this distinctive fly does not have a common name and Sunflower Fruit Fly does seem very appropriate in light of BugGuide’s comment:  “breeds in
Helianthus annuus” which is identified on CalScape as simply Sunflower.  Also, thanks for being so conscious of native insects in your horticultural endeavors.

Immature California Mantid

Subject:  I finally got a photo of this fly on my Cannabis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 08:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I have been seeing this small yellow fly with very pretty wings, about a quarter of an inch long, resting on the leaves of my medical marijuana plants for the past two years, but this is the first time I was able to get some photos.  Please identify this fly and let me know if it will harm my medication.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Fruit Fly:  Paracantha cultaris

Dear Constant Gardener,
This identification proved challenging for us.  We had no luck searching Fruit Flies in the family Tephritidae on Natural History of Orange County, so we browsed through BugGuide where we located
Paracantha cultaris.  According to BugGuide, the hosts are “on Cirsium (Asteraceae)”, so your medical Cannabis should be safe.  According to iNaturalist:  “The adult is mainly orange-brown in color. The maggots can be found inside sunflowers and the adult flies are usually nearby the sunflowers.”

Fruit Fly:  Paracantha cultaris

Thanks Bugman,
That makes sense because I also have sunflowers growing nearby.

 

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Pacific Northwest
Date: 03/18/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDTYour letter to the bugman
Early spring: I found many of these inside the rotting stem of my artichoke plants. They’re less than 1/2 inch on length, are legless,  and move a little like a caterpillar but with much less flexibility.
How you want your letter signed:  a gardener

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Dear Gardener,
This is most certainly the larva of a Fly, generally called a Maggot, and our best guess at this point is that it is the larva of
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly pictured on BugGuide that feeds on artichokes.  Alas, we have not been able to locate any images of the larvae.  Bug Safari has additional images of the adult Fly.

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Subject:  Yellow blue-eyed fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Beach, CA
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 11:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Never seen this fly before. Suddenly noticed them around my work office. It’s been unusually rainy the last few months. Not sure if it’s related at all. It’s eyes look green in the picture, but they’re really a purplish blue. Please identity!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Fruit Fly

Dear Curious,
This is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, and it reminds us of
Euleia fratria which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide: the larvae are “Leaf miners in parsnip and other Apiaceae and Asteraceae” plant families well represented in Longbeach.

Thanks! I had looked up California fruit flies from and no results like this one. Happy to know 🙂
Thanks again for replying.

Subject:  Unknown “Picturewing Fly”?
Geographic location of the bug:  Amherst MA, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 01:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this fly in 2004 and have never asked anyone to identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Joseph G. Kunkel

Fruit Fly

Dear Joseph,
This is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it is in the genus
Eutreta.   According to BugGuide, they are “Gall-formers on Asteraceae” and the habitat is “Coastal Dunes, Woodlands.”

Subject:  Fruit or deer fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Rochester, new york
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 09:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Green eyes,chestnut body w gold shield,almost, on back .black lines on transparent wings. Looked a bit like a smallish deer fly or a very large fruit fly.
How you want your letter signed:  Dip-Teran

Walnut Husk Fly

Dear Dip-Teran,
This is a Walnut Husk Fly,
Rhagoletis completa, one of the Fruit Flies in the family Tephritidae, and it is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide the larval host is:  “Walnut husks primarily. It can attack other plants, such as peaches.”

Thank you!  That explains it!  It’s peach season here!