Currently viewing the category: "Fruit Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Pacific Northwest
Date: 03/18/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDTYour letter to the bugman
Early spring: I found many of these inside the rotting stem of my artichoke plants. They’re less than 1/2 inch on length, are legless,  and move a little like a caterpillar but with much less flexibility.
How you want your letter signed:  a gardener

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Dear Gardener,
This is most certainly the larva of a Fly, generally called a Maggot, and our best guess at this point is that it is the larva of
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly pictured on BugGuide that feeds on artichokes.  Alas, we have not been able to locate any images of the larvae.  Bug Safari has additional images of the adult Fly.

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow blue-eyed fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Beach, CA
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 11:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Never seen this fly before. Suddenly noticed them around my work office. It’s been unusually rainy the last few months. Not sure if it’s related at all. It’s eyes look green in the picture, but they’re really a purplish blue. Please identity!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Fruit Fly

Dear Curious,
This is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, and it reminds us of
Euleia fratria which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide: the larvae are “Leaf miners in parsnip and other Apiaceae and Asteraceae” plant families well represented in Longbeach.

Thanks! I had looked up California fruit flies from and no results like this one. Happy to know 🙂
Thanks again for replying.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown “Picturewing Fly”?
Geographic location of the bug:  Amherst MA, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 01:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this fly in 2004 and have never asked anyone to identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Joseph G. Kunkel

Fruit Fly

Dear Joseph,
This is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it is in the genus
Eutreta.   According to BugGuide, they are “Gall-formers on Asteraceae” and the habitat is “Coastal Dunes, Woodlands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fruit or deer fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Rochester, new york
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 09:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Green eyes,chestnut body w gold shield,almost, on back .black lines on transparent wings. Looked a bit like a smallish deer fly or a very large fruit fly.
How you want your letter signed:  Dip-Teran

Walnut Husk Fly

Dear Dip-Teran,
This is a Walnut Husk Fly,
Rhagoletis completa, one of the Fruit Flies in the family Tephritidae, and it is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide the larval host is:  “Walnut husks primarily. It can attack other plants, such as peaches.”

Thank you!  That explains it!  It’s peach season here!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hawaii
Date: 04/15/2018
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just need to know what this is so we can kill it and keep it out of our yard
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Oriental Fruit Fly

Based on images posted to Wikimedia and Nucleus where it states “Host: Most fruits and fruiting vegetables” and “Highly significant economic damage”, we believe this is an Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.  According to Featured Creatures, the Oriental Fruit Fly has been introduced to Hawaii and “The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a very destructive pest of fruit in areas where it occurs. It is native to large parts of tropical Asia, has become established over much of sub-Saharan Africa, and is often intercepted in the United States, sometimes triggering eradication programs.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of fly is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 11:28 PM EDT
Hello, Bugman
Can you tell me what type of fly this is? Luckily it stayed on my hand long enough for me to take a somewhat clear image. I found this near my garden in Los Angeles.
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Mediterranean Fruit Fly

Dear Nancy,
Were you in Los Angeles in the 1980s?  This is a Mediterranean Fruit Fly, the dreaded Med Fly that caused so many millions of dollars to be spent on aerial spraying of malathion with helicopters.  We identified your Med Fly thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “One of the world’s most destructive fruit pests, and the most economically important fruit fly species. Each infestation detected in FL and CA triggered massive eradication and detection effort. In CA, large numbers of sterile males are released and are not uncommon in some places. A female would be a sign of an infestation, and should be reported immediately. Females have a visible ovipositor on the rear tip of the abdomen and lack the ornamented hairs on the male head.”  We do not see an ovipositor and it appears your individual has hairs on the head, so we suspect it is a male.  Though it is not identified as a female, this BugGuide image appears to be of a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination