Currently viewing the category: "Flesh Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found giant fly at neighbors house
Geographic location of the bug:  Tennessee
Date: 08/29/2018
Time: 08:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this giant fly at my neighbors house. Well I found 3 of them so far and took a pic of one. He is an elderly man and I sometimes clean his house for him. He had to put his dog down because it got sick. Three holes were discovered on its back. Could this fly be the cause? What type is it and how can he get rid of them? Thanks for your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Nessa

Flesh Fly

Dear Nessa,
This is a Flesh Fly in the family Sarcophagidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails. Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  If the dog’s flesh had necrotized, it is possible that the Flesh Flies laid eggs in the wounds.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big striped bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Edmond, OK
Date: 06/15/2018
Time: 10:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son found this bug near a creek. It looked dead, as flies were crawling on it. It’s over an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Gage

Cottonwood Borer

Dear Gage,
This magnificent beetle is a Cottonwood Borer, and since cottonwood trees are frequently found near water sources, that would explain the beetles proximity to the creek.  The fly appears to be a Flesh Fly.

Cottonwood Borer and Flesh Fly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Penn State University Park Campus
Date: 10/03/2017
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Hi,
I have this fly that I need correctly identified. I have identified it as the Phaonia Palpata Fly; however, I believe that’s incorrect as that particular species of fly usually resides in England. I hope you can help me identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  N

Flesh Fly

Dear N,
This is a Flesh Fly in the family Sarcophagidae, but we are uncertain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: California valley
November 11, 2016 11:58 am
Working in California Valley and have seen a few of these insects slowly crawling around. There are flies everywhere, tons of them, but just today caught a slow mover munching on one of the flies, hence becoming a welcome addition to my home. They’ve been doing well too as they’ve left a pile of leftover carcasses at the base of their attack.
Just wondering what it is.
Thanks,
Signature: Chris

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Leafhopper Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Dear Chris,
The predator is an Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus, and the prey appears to be a Flesh Fly.  We believe the Assassin is a Leafhopper Assassin Bug, Zelus renardii, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Generalist predator (despite its common name suggesting host specificity).”  Zelus Assassin Bugs seem to bite humans more readily than most other Assassin Bugs, with the exception of blood-sucking Kissing Bugs, and though their bite is not considered dangerous to humans, it may leave the bite site tender and swollen.  They should be handled with caution to avoid bites.

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Thank you..  They do keep the flies at bay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae
Location: richardson, tx
May 12, 2015 9:46 pm
Does anyone know what this could be? Just found about 2 dozen in my son’s room. They were primarily found under some laundry sheets that had been cleaned 2 days prior. Also some found around the baseboard in the room. Please help. . also have an unidentified smell coming from the same room around the same time these were found.
Signature: Jesse

Fly Puparia

Fly Puparia

Dear Jesse,
These look like the Puparia of Flies.  Perhaps something crawled into your son’s room and died, or perhaps some food was left to rot.  It is also possible there might be a dead animal in the walls that could have attracted the flies that laid the eggs that hatched into maggots that fed on the rotting organic material and that eventually metamorphosed into these Puparia.
  The likeliest candidates are Flesh Flies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination