Currently viewing the category: "Bot Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bot fly?
Location: Northeast Wisconsin
March 7, 2017 6:44 pm
Thank you in advance for your time.
The other night I woke up with a stinging sensation on the edge of my upper lip. Turn on the light and I see this insect on the back of my hand.
I live in northeast Wisconsin, and this this occurred the first week of March. We had a week over unseasonably warm weather and I had brought some things in from the garage where I believe it hitchhiked in.
Signature: v/r, Luke

Bot Fly

Dear Luke,
We agree that this is a Bot Fly.  To the best of our knowledge, they do not sting nor bite, and we suspect the sensation you felt upon being startled from your sleep relates to the Bot Fly’s legs brushing against your sensitive lips.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee
Location: Orlando Florida
November 4, 2016 7:07 pm
Ok, so I found this bee by the pool, and I’m extremely curious as too it’s species! I believe it’s of the Apidae family, and its stingless. I have a pretty good picture, I really hope you can tell me what species it is!
Signature: Thank you! Maihaa

Rodent Bot Fly

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Maihaa,
Though it resembles a Bumble Bee, this is actually a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.

Thank you! That’s fascinating! I’ve decided to do more research on it, for some reason I find it quite intriguing. Is there anything more you can tell me about it?
Maihaa

Hi again Maihaa,
The larvae are endoparasites on rodents that do not harm the host, which is hard to believe.  See our Bot Fly archives and BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larvae?
Location: Central MN
August 7, 2016 7:52 am
Hi, Bugman! What on earth is this, apparent, larvae? About an inch and a half long, VERY chubby, no ‘legs’. Looks like Jabba the Hutt! Black spotty body, found in a garage.
Signature: Confused naturalist

Rodent Bot Fly Maggot

Rodent Bot Fly Maggot

Dear Confused Naturalist,
This looks to us like the larva of a Rodent Bot Fly.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

THANK YOU!!  Yes, I found that on your amazing website…..I refer to it often. Thank you for your quick response. I have never EVER seen this before…and I’ve been on a frenzy trying to figure it out. Now I can sleep…hehehehee! (Total bug nerd)
Kelly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Canada
July 15, 2016 5:15 pm
Hi there,
Wondering what this bug is… Found it in the grass. It looks sort of like a bumblebee but it only looks to have one wing on the back.
Signature: S.G

Rodent Bot Fly

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear S. G.
Many folks mistake Rodent Bot Flies for Bumble Bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Florence, Mississippi
December 12, 2015 8:29 am
I found this bug in my house along with my dogs. I am concerned that it is some sort of parasite, but was not able to identify it yet. If you know what this is it would surely ease my mind and worrying.
Signature: In waiting Jamie Hancock

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Dear Keith,
We believe this is a Rodent Bot Fly Pupa, an internal parasite that is usually very host specific.  Since you found it in the home, we are surmising the host may have been a mouse or rat.

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large fly and spider
Location: New Hampshire
November 14, 2015 7:35 pm
Howdy!
I was camping in New Hampshire in the white mountains area. These two cuties were with us. One as a dinner guest and the other after a rain storm. Please help. I’m good at identifying most bugs (I actually wanted to be an entomologist ) but I was surprised by them.
Signature: Eric Barbasso

Rodent Bot Fly

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Eric,
Your spider is one of the Orbweavers, and your large fly is a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and “runs” of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”  We believe your Bot Fly is Cuterebra fontinella fontinella, and according to Bugguide:  “White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are the main host for this subspecies.”

Mr. Marlos,
Thanks for getting back to me. That’s what I thought as far the spider was concered. But, to know we have Bot Flys here is scary.
Thank you
Eric

Hi again Eric,
Though sightings of adult Rodent Bot Flies are not that frequent, based on the number of rodents with bots, they are not rare, and they are no cause for alarm.  The bots are not especially detrimental to the rodents and the Bot Flies do not trouble humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination