Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Maybe a new bug specie
Geographic location of the bug:  Montreal, Cote-des-Neiges Minto appartments,Quebec,Canada
Date: 04/13/2021
Time: 03:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I may have found a new bug, I search images of it but found none, i am still 11 years old i found it away from grass, It seemed to move, It had a long black nose like a needle, 2 front legs and 2 back legs they were skinny I don’t know if he had 4 or 6 legs, it ha black and clear wings, it was very small and was fuzzy, it was all yellow/beige but in its back it was a black circle, it did no harm and when we touched it ,it moved but didn’t fly away.I found it with my little sister.
How you want your letter signed:  Lilya (the future scientist)

Bee Fly

Dear Lilya (the future scientist),
First let me congratulate you on knowing that you want to be a scientist at such a young age.  This is actually a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, most likely the Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “A common and widespread bee fly, often seen taking nectar on early spring wildflowers or seen hovering in sunny patches in woodlands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tiger Bee Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  BuTyler Pennsylvania  (Butler???)
Date: 08/24/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is it normal to see a tiger bee fly in north western pennsylvania?  I have never seen one before
How you want your letter signed:  Rob Och

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Rob,
We suspect your sighting was in Butler, Pennsylvania, not BuTyler.  According to BugGuide data, the Tiger Bee Fly ranges over most of eastern North America, including BuTyler, Pennsylvania.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Lincoln, MA
Date: 08/24/2019
Time: 11:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
This large fly (about an inch long) has been hanging around my deck for a few weeks.  It has an unusual habit of repeatedly darting at the railing when it hovers near the wood.  I am usually able to identify insects on-line, but have not had luck with this one.
How you want your letter signed:  Inconsistent naturalist

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Inconsistent naturalist,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly and we get numerous identification requests for them each summer.  The female Tiger Bee Fly lays her eggs in the nest of Carpenter Bees, which might be the reason this individual is hovering year your wooden railing.  We love your action image.

Tiger Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly? Day moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Alabama
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This little creature was hanging out where our ladder attaches to the pool. Can you identify?
How you want your letter signed:  Tammy

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Tammy,
This is neither a butterfly nor a diurnal moth.  It is a Tiger Bee Fly, a harmless and very distinctive looking Fly.  See BugGuide for a comparison image.

Thank you so much for your time! I asked everyone around here if they knew what this interesting little creature that seems to have Zeus’s face on it’s back.
Best Regards,
Tammy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subjec:  Black fly with beautiful wings
Geographic location of the bug:  Brussels, Belgium
Date: 05/27/2019
Time: 01:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It was the first time seeing this fly today.  The weather was a mild May Day. It’s wings were what caught my attention
How you want your letter signed:  Eigo Creativity

Bee Fly

Dear Eigo Creativity,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae and it looks very similar to our North American Tiger Bee Fly.  We believe your species is
Anthrax anthrax which is pictured on Dave’s Garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Knysna, South Africa
Date: 01/17/2019
Time: 02:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this interesting fella on a farm during December. I’d love to know what it is. I spotted it twice. Flies short distances and appeared to stay quite low to the ground.
How you want your letter signed:  Janine

Bee Fly

Dear Janine,
This is a wonderful image of a very striking looking Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, but alas, providing a species identification is proving to be difficult.  We did locate a matching image on Southern Africa Nature Photography and the blogger Selwyn Quan notes:  “The Bee flies (Family Bombyliidae) in South Africa have been very impressive. They are more than double the size of the Bee flies I usually spot in California, USA.  There is however a dearth of resources on the internet regarding identification of Bee flies of South Africa.”  We believe we eventually identified your individual as
Bombomyia discoidea based on this iSpot posting and this iSpot posting.  Encyclopedia of Life has a nice image of a sexually dimorphic mating pair.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination