Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black flying insect
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 16, 2017 12:08 pm
We are seeing quite a few of these bugs in our backyard and one of our dogs is extra curious. Is it harmful or invasive? What is it?
Signature: Kate

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Kate,
The Tiger Bee Fly is native and it is harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hummingbird moth? Oregon
Location: Grizzly Mountain, Ashland OR
July 12, 2017 6:44 pm
Dear Bugman,
I photographed this insect on Grizzly Mountain near Ashland, Southern Oregon, on July 3rd. Is it a hummingbird moth? If so, what species? I would be very grateful for an ID. I did not get any other angles on the insect, it moved so fast.
Signature: Emma

Bee Fly

Dear Emma,
This is not a Hummingbird Moth.  This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, and your image of it nectaring while hovering is awesome.  Most images of Bee Flies on our site picture them at rest.  Though we are able to provide a family classification, we cannot see either the markings on the body or the wings, so we cannot provide you with a species identification.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much – I did not expect such a quick response! If it’s a Bee Fly, that explains why I could not find a picture of it online, since I was looking at hummingbird moths. D’oh.
There were thousands of them up on the mountain, as well as many kinds of actual bees, hover flies, other flies, butterflies and moths.
Thanks again
Emma

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Furry bug
Location: Bay Area, San Francisco
July 11, 2017 6:16 pm
Dear bugman,
This furry little bug landed on my foot, stayed for a bit and then gently flew away. What do you think it is? Thank you!
Signature: Melissa S.

Bee Fly

Dear Melissa,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camera Hog
Location: Maryland
July 11, 2017 4:49 pm
Something landed on security camera and covered up the lens. I sure jumped and then realized it was a bug.. I tried to get a clear picture, but the security camera is black and so is the bug. When my husband pushed it with his finger, it flew off fast and was gone before we could get a good look. Best photos I could get are attached.
Signature: Mary

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Mary,
We wish you had sent an image of what the security camera “saw” that made you jump.  There is still enough detail in your image to tell that this is a harmless Tiger Bee Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “wing pattern distinctive.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help me identify this bug
Location: Southampton, UK
April 20, 2017 2:53 am
Hi Bugman!
Love your site, great idea! I am hoping you can identify a bug for me… This was spotted in South of UK over the Easter Weekend (16th April), it seemed to have a long proboscis!
Can you help?
Thanks,
Signature: Will

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Will,
The Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, is found in Europe as well as in North America.  It is a harmless species that helps to pollinate flowers.  According to Wildlife Watch:  “The larvae are nest parasites of ground-nesting bees, feeding on the bee grubs.”

Wow! What amazing service, thanks Bugman! 🙂
A really interesting fly then – looks like it mimics a bee but is really a fly…
Will

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery insect?
Location: South east, U.K.
March 24, 2017 10:29 am
Haven’t ever seen this type before would love to have it identified.
Signature: Alexa

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Alexa,
Please forgive us for making a bad joke, but aren’t you supposed to have all the answers?  This is a Bee Fly, most likely
Bombylius major which is pictured on NatureSpot where it states:  ” A strange looking insect with its furry body and patterned wings. The long proboscis is used for drinking nectar and the fly is totally harmless.”

Haha exactly! Thank you for getting back to me so quickly!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination