Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee
Geographic location of the bug:  California
Date: 04/22/2019
Time: 07:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bee
How you want your letter signed:  What kind of bee

Hover Fly

This is not a Bee.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, a group that includes many members that mimic stinging Bees and Wasps for protection as the Hover Flies neither sting nor bite, and they benefit from being mistaken by predators for stinging insects.  We identified your individual as Eristalinus taeniops on The Natural History of Orange County.  The gap between the eyes on your individual identifies her as female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Coryell County
Date: 04/13/2019
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! This large fly-like insect sat on our porch for several hours. I don’t know if it was injured, but it didn’t move much. I have been unable to match its photo. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Ellen

Male Robber Fly

Dear Ellen,
How nice to hear from you.  This is one of the predatory Robber Flies in the family Asilidae.  Because of the tufted abdomen, we are inclined to speculate that this is a male Robber Fly in the genus
Efferia, and though its markings are different, you can see that it resembles this individual on BugGuide.

Thank you so much! The photo in bug guide is amazingly detailed. Best wishes to you both.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Anthropod Classification
Geographic location of the bug:  United States, Florida
Date: 03/24/2019
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I had to take pictures of anthropods I could find in my yard and classify the bugs for my zoology class. For the life of me, I can’t figure out what it is. I took the picture in my front yard and I am located in Florida. I appreciate any help you could offer me. Thank you in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Willow Orr

Soldier Fly

Dear Willow,
Based on this BugGuide image, we believe this is a Soldier Fly in the genus
Hedriodiscus.  According to BugGuide:  “spp. are very difficult to ID and not all are valid.”  An even closer visual match is the Soldier Fly Odontomyia cincta, also pictured on BugGuide.  Though we are uncertain of the species, we are confident this is a Soldier Fly.

Soldier Fly

ou are spot on! It is an Odontomyia cincta Soldier Fly. Thank you so much for respond, I appreciate the help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  New mosquitos in vegas?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Las Vegas, NV
Date: 03/31/2019
Time: 02:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen a handful of these over the last couple weeks.
How you want your letter signed:  JB

Crane Fly

Dear JB,
This is a harmless Crane Fly, not a Mosquito.  Crane Flies are often called “Mosquito Hawks” though they do not prey upon Mosquitoes.  The wet winter weather may be contributing to larger numbers of spring Crane Flies this year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large black flies (Mydas??) showing up in my house.
Geographic location of the bug:  Charlottesville, VA
Date: 03/25/2019
Time: 07:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve noticed several of these bugs around the windows in my house. I will find many of them dead on the ground or sometimes crawling around on the window sill. They are black and quite large (3/4″ long). I’m thinking that they are mydas flies but am not 100%.
Any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated.
If these are Mydas flies where are they coming from and what can I do to get rid of them?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Zushi

Black Soldier Fly

Dear Zushi,
This is not a Mydas Fly.  Rather, it is a Black Soldier Fly or Window Fly,
Hermetia illucens.  The name Window Fly refers to clear patches in the abdomen, and not because they are found in windows.  Do you have a nearby compost pile?  Larvae of Black Soldier Flies are frequently found in compost piles.  We do not provide extermination advice. 

Black Soldier Fly

Daniel,
Thank you for the reply/information. I will have a look at their abdomen and look for the transparency. I do have a personal compost bin in my backyard garden. I’ve used the compost in soils around my garden and most likely i’ve dug up some of that soil to use in pots that I have some plants in inside my house. This is probably my source.
I understand not giving extermination advice. Once the weather changes for the better I plan on moving most of my plants outside. I will probably go through the process of replacing a lot of the potted soil as well and moving the current soil back into my compost.
Anything else you could provide would be greatly appreciate.
Best regards,
John Boyd

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Pacific Northwest
Date: 03/18/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDTYour letter to the bugman
Early spring: I found many of these inside the rotting stem of my artichoke plants. They’re less than 1/2 inch on length, are legless,  and move a little like a caterpillar but with much less flexibility.
How you want your letter signed:  a gardener

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Dear Gardener,
This is most certainly the larva of a Fly, generally called a Maggot, and our best guess at this point is that it is the larva of
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly pictured on BugGuide that feeds on artichokes.  Alas, we have not been able to locate any images of the larvae.  Bug Safari has additional images of the adult Fly.

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination