Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grasshopper fly mix
Geographic location of the bug:  Enschede, The Netherlands
Date: 06/16/2019
Time: 08:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What’s the name of this bug? It appears to have two small “fangs” and rainbow colored eye’s, it’s not shy nor aggressive, i could easily touch it. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin Hoekstra

Female Notch Horned Cleg

Dear Kevin,
Though we were confident that this is a female Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae, there were enough features to cause us to consider it might be a member of a different family, but we quickly located the Notch Horned Cleg,
Haematopota pluvialis, on Influential Points  where it states:  “The female Haematopota pluvialis has distinctively patterned hairy eyes – the eye stripes extend over most of the eye.”  The site also states:  “There are of course innumerable accounts of Haematopota pluvialis biting man, especially in upland areas where clegs can turn a pleasant walk into an endurance course. Our own experience in the Scottish Highlands is that when the sun is out, the clegs bite; when the sun goes in the midges bite! Flight (and hence feeding) activity of Haematopota pluvialis is dependent on a sufficiently high humidity and temperature (Krčmar, 2004).”

Yes! That’s it, thank you! In Dutch it appears to be “Regendaas”.
Regards,
Kevin Hoekstra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Super Close ups of Robber Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellijay, GA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son excitedly for this guy and we Scored some great shots of this guy June 10, 2019.  He didn’t seem to mind that I was interrupting his dinner. Would love to know the species.
Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

Dear Melissa,
Your son’s images are wonderful and an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  This is a Beelike Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and it is feeding on an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle, the scourge of many gardeners.  Because of the yellow hairs on the abdomen and legs, and because of your location, we believe this is Laphria macquarti based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Seems to prefer small beetles, but would eat other insects, even other robber flies” which further supports our tentative identification.

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  southwestern ontario
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 09:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been trying to search what kind of bee this is?! it’s slightly larger than the european honeybee. i can’t find anything online. can you help me please?
How you want your letter signed:  heidi

Hover Fly

Dear Heidi,
This is NOT a Bee.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members of the family mimic stinging Bees and Wasps to fool predators.  There are some similar looking species in the genus
Eristalis, and we believe, based on BugGuide images, that this is Eristalis obscura.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bright orange fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Netherlands
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 12:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
I came across this fly a few days ago in urban woodland in Groningen, Northern Netherlands. It looked like a bright orange meat fly to my inexpert eye. I’ve never seen anything like it before. It was about six to eight millimetres long and was sitting on vegetation following light rain at around 8am. I would love to know what it is!
Best wishes, thanks for any ideas!
How you want your letter signed:  Mick

Muscid Fly

Dear Mick,
This is surely a distinctive looking Fly, and the one thing of which we were certain before beginning any research is that the closely spaced eyes indicates it is a male Fly.  Since the UK has an extensive selection of insect identification sites, we tried searching the web for orange flies from the UK, and we discovered
Phaonia pallida pictured on the Adur Flies site.  Wikipedia places it in the family Muscidae with House Flies.  According to NatureSpot:  “Often seen in woodland” and “Larvae are associated with fungi and rotten wood.” 

Muscid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Scottsdale ,AZ
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 03:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was in my car at lunch June 7th, at noon, with my windows open and it was about 95 degrees out. This fly looking thing flew into my car and perched itself right above my head. It was mostly beige and brown kind of resembled a bee but looked more like a fly. To me it looked like it had a very pretty pattern. The more detailed photo in unretouched, the close up color is enhanced to look more like what I saw rather than what the camera saw.
How you want your letter signed:  Alison O’Konski

Hover Fly

Dear Alison,
This is a harmless Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many non-stinging members of this family mimic the colors and markings of stinging Bees and Wasps as a defense against predators.  We matched your image to an image of
Copestylum apiciferum on the Natural History of Orange County site and we verified that identification on BugGuide where the range map incudes Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black-orange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Brunswick, Canada
Date: 06/03/2019
Time: 10:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
On May 31st 2019 I have found a large number of these strange bugs appearing here in New Brunswick, Canada and also in Maine, USA. They do not seem to harm anything. I have seen them in clusters of over 1,000. They are fly like and have orange and black segmented legs. Wings have markings. The antennae are very short, maybe around 2mm. I have looked all over the internet at thousands of bugs and can not find anything anywhere. Any help would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  JP

March Fly

Dear JP,
This is a March Fly in the family Bibionidae, and during mating season, there may be great numbers of adults emerging and mating, and then vanishing as quickly as they appeared.  We believe your individual might be a female
Bibio xanthopus, and you can see an image of a sexually dimorphic male which has much larger eyes pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination