Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Christchurch New Zealand
Date: 10/11/2019
Time: 08:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m unsure what this is, at first I thought it was a blowfly so I swatted it and then I noticed the yellow colouring on its back and was worried it may be a bee of some sort
How you want your letter signed:  Isaac Thomas

Three Lined Hover Fly

Dear Isaac,
This is a harmless Three Lined Hoverfly,
Helophilus seelandicus.  According to Landcare Research:  “Attracts attention because of its noisy flight.  Important pollinator of flowers.  Larvae are rat tailed maggots which live in liquid containing rotting plants or animals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stained glass wings
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellicott City, Maryland
Date: 10/04/2019
Time: 08:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Shortly after replacing our aluminum siding and roofing last month (September)  I noticed this insect sunning itself on the third story window ledge.  Can you please help identify it?  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Dee

Picture Winged Fly

Dear Dee,
This Fly is
Delphinia picta, one of the Picture Winged Flies in the family Ulidiidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Many found on goldenrod
Geographic location of the bug:  Greenport, LI, NY  eastern end of Long Island ny
Date: 09/14/2019
Time: 07:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Photographed these today and cannot identify
How you want your letter signed:  Amy

March Flies

Dear Amy,
Based on this BugGuide image, these appear to be March Flies in the genus
Dilophus.  There are numerous images of Dilophus spinipes on goldenrod on BugGuide.

Thank you so much!   I truly appreciate your help!
Amy
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black wings with yellow wody
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Tennessee
Date: 09/08/2019
Time: 07:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These are all over my porch , theye are bigger than a knat but smaller that a fly
How you want your letter signed:  Peggy plant

Dark Winged Fungus Gnat

Dear Peggy,
We are so sorry because this has been on the back burner for nearly a week because we thought this was a March Fly but we were never able to find a match in that family.  This is a Dark Winged Fungus Gnat in the family Sciaridae based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Often found in flowerpots. In moist and shadowy areas up to 70% of all Diptera species can be Sciaridae.”

Dark Winged Fungus Gnat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Biting Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Tyler, Texas
Date: 08/31/2019
Time: 12:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We see these ‘bugs’ usually in the fall. Their bite is painful and leaves whelps. Wasp killer spray does them in so we got pictures this time.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob & Elaine

Possibly Robber Fly

Dear Bob & Elaine,
Normally we would expect a large biting fly to be a Horse Fly or a Deer Fly, and this looks more to us like a predatory Robber Fly, but we have not had any luck matching your images to a species.  While we caution readers not to carelessly handle large Robber Flies as they might bite, we do not know of any reports of unprovoked bites from Robber Flies.  We will be sending your images to Eric Eaton to get a second opinion on its identity.

Possibly Robber Fly

Eric Eaton Responds.
Hi, Daniel:
Yes, it is a robber fly, but I suspect that it is guilty by association with something like a horse fly or deer fly.  Robber flies do NOT habitually bite people.  They are strictly predators of other insects.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego, CA
Date: 08/31/2019
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a Tachnid Fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlene

Green Bottle Fly

Dear Marlene,
This looks to us like a Green Bottle Fly,
Lucilia sericata, which is pictured on the Natural History of Orange County and on BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on carrion. Adults take nectar and have been used as pollinators of onions, cabbages and also other Brassicaceae” and “Larvae are used in forensics to determine the age of a corpse, and in medicine to clean up wounds (they feed on partially decomposed tissue, leaving the healthy one alone).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination