Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colourful fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Oak Beach qld
Date: 02/14/2019
Time: 09:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Spotted this beautiful fly.  First time I have seen one like this.  Just wondering what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Rhonda

Tachinid Fly

Dear Rhonda,
This is a parasitic Tachinid Fly, and according to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Some tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby.”  Your individual resembles this colorful Tachinid Fly from New Guinea.  The Museums Victoria Collection has a similar looking individual identified in the genus Rutilia.  This Rutilia species on FlickR also looks similar, but not exactly correct.  The Brisbane Insect site has images of several species in the genus Rutilia, and we believe the genus is correct, but we are not certain of the species.  Tachinid Flies are called Bristle Flies in Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a fly or a wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Stamsund, Lofoten Islands, Norway
Date: 02/15/2019
Time: 07:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I took this picture a couple of years ago in my garden and I never was able to find a proper answer. I wonder if you maybe can give me a clue at least? The colors are very much like a wasp, but the shape doesn’t. From what I remember, it’s bigger than a normal fly.
Cheers from Norway
How you want your letter signed:  Alberto Martinez

Hover Fly

Dear Alberto,
This is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many harmless members of the family benefit from mimicking stinging Bees or Wasps.  Based on this Wikimedia posting, we believe Blomsterfluer is the common name for Hover Fly in Norway.  Your individual looks very similar to 
Chrysotoxum arcuatum which is pictured on Miljolare.no.

Very cool! Thank you very much for all the information!
Regards from Norway
Alberto

Hi again Alberto,
21 years ago, Daniel traveled to Oslo and had an exhibition at UKS called Rudimentary Particles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bristle Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mittagong NSW
Date: 01/26/2019
Time: 10:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this today. Is it a Bristle Fly?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks and regards, Paul

Tachinid Fly

Dear Paul,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, and members of this family are sometimes called Bristle Flies in Australia, but we are not entirely certain if that name is used for the entire family or just a few species, like
Amphibolia vidua which is represented on our site under the common name Bristle Fly.  We believe your individual is a different species, possibly Formosia speciosa, which is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Robber fly.
Geographic location of the bug:  Numurkah Victoria
Date: 01/26/2019
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Gday to be buggered I could fine any relation to this bug.
Then your site popped up.
I have sighted this fly several times in the last month or so.
Different locations around our 60acres.
It’s massive. It’s loud. It’s soooo fast. I had to take a slow mo video of it.
Any way would like to know anything you have on this sucker.
How you want your letter signed:  Sorry not sure on this question.

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

We have always found the Giant Yellow Robber Fly, Blepharotes coriarius, from Australia to be an extremely impressive Robber Fly.  The Australian Asilidae site also pictures several other similar looking species.  Your individual appears to have a tufted abdomen, indicating it is a male, and it really does most resemble the image of the male Blepharotes coriarius pictured near the top of the page. 

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flies on Zululand coast
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, KwaZulu Natal, Mabibi
Date: 01/25/2019
Time: 03:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Flies on a tree in coastal Zululand. Mabibi.
How you want your letter signed:bewilderbeast

Buzzard Signal Flies

Dear bewilderbeast,
These are really crazy looking Flies, almost like toy flies.  This is only the second posting we have made in 17 years of the Buzzard Signal Fly,
Bromophila caffra, from South Africa.  According to WTB? contributor Piotr Naskrecki on his awesome blog The Smaller Majority where he uses the descriptive common name Red Headed Fly, they are:  “large, slow moving insects, reluctant to take to the air, and much happier to hang in clusters from low tree branches. They are truly striking animals, showy and clearly unconcerned about attracting anybody’s attention, including that of potential predators. …  But for an insect as conspicuous and common as the Red-headed fly, shockingly little is known about its biology. In fact, the last scientific paper that mentions it by name (according to an extensive MetaLib cross-database search) is from 1915, and it does so only to compare the fly’s strikingly red head to another species. As already pointed out in an excellent post about this species by Ted C. MacRae, there exists only anecdotal evidence that the larvae of this species might be feeding on the roots of Terminalia trees, potentially sequestering toxic cyclic triterpenes, which would explain the adult flies’ aposematic coloration. But, as is the case with so many African invertebrates, nobody really knows.”  A very detailed image of the Buzzard Signal Fly can be found on Encyclopedia of Life.

Buzzard Signal Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Knysna, South Africa
Date: 01/17/2019
Time: 02:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this interesting fella on a farm during December. I’d love to know what it is. I spotted it twice. Flies short distances and appeared to stay quite low to the ground.
How you want your letter signed:  Janine

Bee Fly

Dear Janine,
This is a wonderful image of a very striking looking Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, but alas, providing a species identification is proving to be difficult.  We did locate a matching image on Southern Africa Nature Photography and the blogger Selwyn Quan notes:  “The Bee flies (Family Bombyliidae) in South Africa have been very impressive. They are more than double the size of the Bee flies I usually spot in California, USA.  There is however a dearth of resources on the internet regarding identification of Bee flies of South Africa.”  We believe we eventually identified your individual as
Bombomyia discoidea based on this iSpot posting and this iSpot posting.  Encyclopedia of Life has a nice image of a sexually dimorphic mating pair.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination