Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Atlanta, Georgia
Date: 01/03/2020
Time: 02:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a fly of some sort?
How you want your letter signed:  Bruce Carlson

Stilt Legged Fly

Dear Bruce,
This is a gorgeous image of a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Micropezidae.  We believe we have correctly identified it as 
Rainieria antennaepes thanks to this BugGuide image.  Of the family, BugGuide notes “Adults of some species are attracted to rotting fruit or dung; in other species adults are predaceous; larvae saprophagous.”  Your image has documented feeding, though we are not certain what has comprised the meal, though based on the BugGuide food information, either “rotting fruit or dung” appears to be a possibility.

Thanks Dan for the identification.  I should have mentioned in my message that my wife took the photograph, but she’s happy to see it posted on your website!
Bruce Carlson

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue robber fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mudgee, nsw
Date: 01/01/2020
Time: 03:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw anothe post with a very similar fly and you said it was an exciting find, so I thought I’d send you mine. Never seen one before, I assume it’s come to escape the fires.
How you want your letter signed:  Cheers, Jeremy.

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Jeremy,
We always love posting excellent images of large Robber Flies, arguably among the most adept winged insect predators.  We believe you are correct that this is a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, based on images posted online.  The human finger for scale is a nice addition.  We are well aware of the horrific fires currently burning in Australia.

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mexican Cactus Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, Arizona
Date: 12/30/2019
Time: 03:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed these flies as they visited flowers at the Tucson Botanical Gardens in Tucson, Arizona.  I think that they may be Mexican Cactus Flies; and I was hoping that you could confirm that.  Of course, you may use the photos if so desired.
How you want your letter signed:  Stephen Nelson

Mexican Cactus Fly

Dear Stephen,
This is indeed a Mexican Cactus Fly,
Copestylum mexicanum.  Though the Mexican Cactus Fly is a member of the Hover Fly family Syrphidae, it does not resemble most other members of the family that look like bees and wasps as protective mimicry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a giant blue robber fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Dapto NSW
Date: 11/22/2019
Time: 11:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this in our backyard….what is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Gwen age 8

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Gwen,
We apologize for the delay in our response.  Daniel was out of the office for over a week spending the Thanksgiving holiday with his 90 year old mother and he did not answer any mail.  We agree that this is most likely a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, which is one impressive predator.  Your images are awesome.  Can you provide us with any observation details from the sighting?

Giant Blue Robber Fly

It stayed in the same position for days- we thought it was dead!!  Then just disappeared! Was amazing to look at though!

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this grub?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mill Creek, Washington
Date: 11/05/2019
Time: 12:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have come across this little guy multiple times over the years when in the yard weeding and am curious what it is.  Any info would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristen

Leather Jacket

Dear Kristen,
We believe you have encountered the larva of a Crane Fly like the ones pictured on BugGuide and again on BugGuide and you may read about them on the Missouri Department of Conservation site.  Charles Hogue in his book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin calls Crane Fly larvae Leather Jackets because of their “thick dark skin.”  Capital Regional District uses the name Leatherjacket.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for satisfying my curiosity.  I appreciate you taking the time to email me back.
Kristen
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Christchurch New Zealand
Date: 10/11/2019
Time: 08:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m unsure what this is, at first I thought it was a blowfly so I swatted it and then I noticed the yellow colouring on its back and was worried it may be a bee of some sort
How you want your letter signed:  Isaac Thomas

Three Lined Hover Fly

Dear Isaac,
This is a harmless Three Lined Hoverfly,
Helophilus seelandicus.  According to Landcare Research:  “Attracts attention because of its noisy flight.  Important pollinator of flowers.  Larvae are rat tailed maggots which live in liquid containing rotting plants or animals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination