Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown “Picturewing Fly”?
Geographic location of the bug:  Amherst MA, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 01:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this fly in 2004 and have never asked anyone to identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Joseph G. Kunkel

Fruit Fly

Dear Joseph,
This is a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it is in the genus
Eutreta.   According to BugGuide, they are “Gall-formers on Asteraceae” and the habitat is “Coastal Dunes, Woodlands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen this before HELP!!!!
Geographic location of the bug:  East TN
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Bugman,
I was at work when this fellow showed up nobody knows what it is. I was a little freaked out (ok a lot). Looks like some sort of crazy bee.
How you want your letter signed:  Christina

Giant Robber Fly

Dear Christina,
This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a predatory species that often catches large winger prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather-legged Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  In addition to the colorful T. pennipes, I had this larger feather-legged fly in my mountain mint patch today.  My best guess is that it is T.  lanipes.  It was quite large and had the most beautiful wings. It’s under-belly was an orange-red color, which was kind of a surprise.   Did I land on the right id?
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah Bifulco

Feather-Legged Fly

Hi Deborah,
The last time you submitted images of a Feather Legged Fly, we originally thought it was
Trichopoda pennipes, but upon further contemplation, we believe it was Trichopoda lanipes.  We agree with you that this is also most likely Trichopoda lanipes.  We especially like that there is a Metallic Sweat Bee in the bottom of one of your images.

Feather-Legged Fly

Feather-Legged Fly and Metallic Sweat Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Glen mills, pa
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 10:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What it this bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Katie

Hanging Thief Carnage

Dear Katie,
This magnificent predator is a Hanging Thief, a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, and they are not aggressive towards humans, but we suspect a bite might occur if a person tried to catch one with bare hands.  The Hanging Thief captures large flying insects, often on the wing, and then the Hanging Thief hangs from one leg to feed.   The prey are frequently Wasps as images here and here in our archives illustrate.  In our opinion, your image documents what we consider to be Unnecessary Carnage, and we hope any future encounters you have with a Hanging Thief will end differently now that you have learned a bit about this amazing creature. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly or parasite
Geographic location of the bug:  Mechanicsburg, pa
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 04:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have found several of these flies on my pepper plants. I am unable to find any information about them. They seem to attach themselves on the leaves with almost a web like thing and than die. Or something. Not really sure.
How you want your letter signed:  Courtney Kerr

Fungus Ridden Fly

Dear Courtney,
Flies and Parasites are not mutually exclusive as there are many parasitoid Flies, including Tachinid Flies.  These are Flies, and they have been infested with a fungus infection.  Here is a similar looking BugGuide image, and your Flies also appear to be Blow Flies.  Many creatures, both plant and animal, can get fungus infections and BugGuide has an entire section devoted to Fungus Ridden Flies. 

Fungus Ridden Flies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber Fly Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Elkridge, MD
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 01:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Yesterday, I found a robber fly on the bush outside my house.  I’ve never had the opportunity to see one so close, especially while it had found a meal!  I’ve been trying to identify what species of robber fly this might be.  I think it might be a Red-footed Cannibalfly, but I’m not sure.   I’d love some help confirming the species of both the robber fly and its dinner!  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Leaf Footed Bug

Dear Renee,
We agree that this Robber Fly is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, or at least another member of the genus
Promachus, the Giant Robber Flies.  The prey is a Leaf Footed Bug in the genus Leptoglossus, and the light tips on the antennae lead us to believe it is likely Leptoglossus oppositus which is pictured on BugGuide, or possibly Leptoglossus fulvicornis, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the latter feeds on “Magnolia fruit” and the former “can be very common on catalpa pods” according to BugGuide.  Alas, other diagnostic features for the Leaf Footed Bug are obscured by the Red Footed Cannibalfly.  Do you have either a magnolia or a catalpa nearby or another camera angle that shows more of the Leaf Footed Bug? 

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my email!  Unfortunately, the only other picture I took was not clear.  I know there are Southern Magnolia trees in the neighborhood.  I don’t think I’ve seen any catalpa in the immediate neighborhood, but we do have them here in Maryland as well.  Just a few days after my first sighting of the Red Footed Cannibalfly, one appeared on the edge of my window that I had the chance to watch again!
Thanks again!
Renée

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination