Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant yellow robber fly from Western Australia
Location: Quinninup, Western Australia
February 23, 2017 3:14 am
I found this giant fly on a window, feet caught in spiderwebbing, 25km south of Manjimup. It is 45mm from head to tip of abdomen, is bright orange on the top of the abdomen and black and hairy underneath. It has tufts of black and white hairs down the sides of the abdomen and very strong black legs covered in barbs.
Signature: PK

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Dear PK,
The Giant Yellow Robber Fly,
Blepharotes coriarius, is one of the most impressive looking flies we have ever received for posting.  We were quite amazed the first time we posted an image of a Giant Yellow Robber Fly nine years ago.  It is one impressive predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: catepillars
Location: Mpumalanga south africa
February 20, 2017 12:32 am
Hi there
I know the precessionary caterpillars. These ones move like, and obviously mimics a snake. they are much smaller. is it maybe the early stage of precessionary catepillars?
thanks
Signature: wetie

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear wetie,
We believe these are Fungus Gnat larvae from the family Sciaridae.  According to iSpot, Fungus Gnats are found in South Africa.  According to BugGuide:  “Sometimes abundant enough to form a crawling mass of several inches across and several feet long, similar to armyworm migrations.”

Fungus Gnat Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect
Location: Bangladesh
February 13, 2017 12:46 pm
This thing i found in my washroom,its a nano thing,but looks like i have never seen it before in my whole life.I need to know what is this thing.Its look like horrible.
Signature: Texting me.

Mosquito Larva

This is some type of larva, and it does remind us of a Beetle larva in the order Coleoptera.

Correction:  Thanks to a comment from Angel Robinson, we reverted to our original first impression that this is a Mosquito larva.  As sometimes happens when we are rushed, we post without any research.  We found a posting on Plankton and Macroinvertegrates of Woodland Vernal Pools that confirms the pictured larva is a Mosquito larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Please
Location: East London, South Africa
February 12, 2017 11:52 am
Hi,
I received a mobile photo of a rather large fly-like insect that I’m trying to identify for interest sake.
I have attached 2 cropped shots (sorry for poor quality) of the insect. It’s eating on a piece of apple, and a regular house fly can be seen in the background.
The photo was taken in East London, South Africa. Climate is coastal hot and humid.
I’d really appreciate it if you could try ID it for me please.
Many thanks
Signature: Kevin Durst

Male Horse Fly

Dear Kevin,
Because of the large eyes, this Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae can be sexed as male.  We found a similar image on iSpot, but it is only identified to the family level.  Female Horse Flies are blood suckers that commonly trouble livestock, and will bite humans if no four legged hosts are available.  Males only feed on sweets, mainly from fruits and nectar from flowers.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for such a quick response, and for your identification and information…I really do appreciate it.
I asked on a Facebook page dedicated to insect I.D. too, and it’s confirmed as Tabanus biguttatus, known locally as a Hippo Fly.
Best Regards
Kevin

Thanks for the species name assistance Kevin.  We actually have a well-researched Hippo Fly posting in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Bois Blanc Island, MI
February 9, 2017 1:07 pm
Last July, on an inland hike on Bois Blanc Island, MI we discovered swamp milkweed covered in these insects. I have zero idea what they were and had never seen them before. But curiosity has the best of me and I would like to know what they were if possible.
THANK YOU!
Signature: B. Dunn

Fungus Gnats, we believe

Dear B. Dunn,
At first we thought these might be March Flies, but they do not feed and most insects attracted to milkweed blossoms do so because of the rich nectar they provide.  We then entertained they might be Soft Winged Flower Beetles, but that did not look correct, so we contacted Eric Eaton for assistance.

Eric Eaton provides a possible identification.
Daniel:
These remind me of dark-winged fungus gnats, family Sciaridae, but I cannot tell for certain from this one image.
Eric

Ed. Note:  This BugGuide image supports Eric Eaton’s identification.  Though BugGuide does not provide any information on adult food preferences, BugGuide does contain some images of adult Dark Winged Fungus Gnats feeding from blossoms.

Fungus Gnats, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug on garage door
Location: Fullerton, CA
February 5, 2017 7:54 pm
Please solve our big mystery. I ve tried going to several bug sites to identify this thing to no avail. Can you please step in?
Signature: Greg Castro

Hover Fly

Dear Greg,
We believe we have correctly identified your Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae as
 Fazia (Allograpta) micrura thanks to the images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, California page.  Many harmless members of the family mimic stinging bees and wasps as a defense mechanism against predators.

Thank you so much for the speedy reply! Much appreciated!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination