Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Botfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Byron center MI
Date: 07/19/2020
Time: 11:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe this is a type of botfly?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan

Rabbit Bot Fly

Hi Evan,
You are correct that this is a Bot Fly, and thanks to this image, we believe it is
Cuterebra abdominalis which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the host is cottontail rabbits.  Your images are awesome.

Rabbit Bot Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bumble Bee mimicking hoverfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New York
Date: 07/16/2020
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
I was startled by what I thought was a bumblebee in my bedroom, until I started to scoop it up in a glass and carry it outside, and I realized it was something like a monstrous horsefly. After some internet searching, I see it is a hover fly, but cannot seem to find this species. For scale, the wires are half an inch apart.
Thanks for any help!
How you want your letter signed:  Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Shoo Fly,
This is actually a Rodent Bot Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black fly, yellow stripe on head
Geographic location of the bug:  Westfield, MA, USA
Date: 07/11/2020
Time: 01:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have a hybrid hydrangea that blooms through July.  Some days there are many dozens of insects enjoying the blooms.  I cannot identify this one.
How you want your letter signed:  Steveb

Featherlegged Fly

Dear Steveb,
This is one of the parasitoid Tachinid Flies in the genus
Trichopoda which are known as the Featherlegged Flies, and it is probably Trichopoda lanipes which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it preys on Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Prehistoric Wasp-ish Bug Creature ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Leming, TX, USA
Date: 07/08/2020
Time: 08:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, I have seen the attached waspish creature here in the Texas Brush Country in summers past. It’s about 1.5-2 inches tall, and it looks like it’s wearing a fuzzy sweater vest. Just seems to sit there and stare at me, hence the desire to know something about my observer. Thanks a bunch in advance, Bugman.
How you want your letter signed:  Debbie LV

Robber Fly: Possibly Saropogon hypomelas

Dear Debbie,
This is one impressive predatory Robber Fly, and Texas has its share of giant Robber Flies.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Saropogon, possibly Saropogon hypomelas which is pictured on BugGuide.

Hi Daniel, WOW! I am so glad to know we have an obviously well-fed beneficial! That eats grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs! I will be sure to express appreciation instead of abject fear when next we meet.Thank you so much for your reply.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly? Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest Indiana
Date: 07/07/2020
Time: 09:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this fella floating in our pool. I have lived here all my life and have never seen a fly/wasp this big! Can you identify?
How you want your letter signed:  Carrie

Mydas Fly

Dear Carrie,
This is a harmless Mydas Fly, and it is widely believed that this Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, benefits from mimicking a stinging wasp. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful biting fly (with bonus Karner Blue)
Geographic location of the bug:  Albany Pine Bush, Albany, NY
Date: 07/07/2020
Time: 12:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Susan B. here with another dispatch from the Albany Pine Bush! I was having a nice raspberry-picking expedition along the trail when a rather beautiful fly came along and landed on my finger. I was so enchanted by its incredible eyes that I failed to notice it had stabbed its proboscis right into my flesh! I shooed it away, and I still have a sore spot where it bit me. Any idea who this rude little creature was?
Astute viewers will notice that while I was dealing with the fly situation, I was also providing transport to another, equally beautiful but much more polite hitchhiker: a Karner Blue that had come along and landed on my finger a few minutes earlier. I’m pleased to say I managed to both photograph and shoo the fly without disturbing my other passenger, who stuck around, lapping up my sweat, for a good quarter mile of trail.
How you want your letter signed:  Susan B.

Deer Fly

Dear Susan,
Thanks for your highly entertaining query.  You have been bitten by a Deer Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on plant nectar; females on vertebrate blood; larvae carnivorous and detritus feeders.”  You described their “incredible eyes”, and this BugGuide image beautifully captures the details of the eyes of a Deer Fly. Blues are one of the groups of butterflies that frequently have “puddle parties” on damp earth, a behavior beautifully described by Vladimir Nabakov in his fiction, and scientists believe they derive important minerals from this behavior.  We suspect your salty perspiration fulfilled your Karner Blue‘s need for moisture and minerals.

Karner Blue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination