Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this little guy?
Geographic location of the bug:  Marysville, WA
Date: 12/13/2018
Time: 07:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this guy hanging out around my pineapple mint last July. Do you know what it is? It’s surprisingly beautiful whatever it is!
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa C.

Flower Fly

Dear Melissa,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  Many members of this family are effective mimics of stinging wasps and bees, so the otherwise harmless Flower Flies benefit from this protective mimicry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Frozen Like Han Solo
Geographic location of the bug:  a pond in northern IL
Date: 12/10/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi.  We were hiking in the woods and saw a few of these trapped in the ice of two different shallow ponds near our home.  Each specimen was about 2 to 2.5 inches long.  I thought it must be a larvae of a pond insect, but I haven’t been able to find any that are supposed to be that big.  Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Mary

Horse Fly Larva

Dear Mary,
This looks to us like the larva of a Horse Fly.  There is a matching image on Quora where it states:  “Most horse flies are associated with water, and the carnivorous larvae can be found therein.”

Thank you! and Yuck!
I appreciate your help.  I always attempt to do my own identifying, but whenever I am stuck, you always come through.
My curiosity thanks you.
Mary
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I think it is under the order Mecoptera
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney Australia
Date: 11/22/2018
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I live in Sydney Australia and it is currently late spring.
I spotted this insect on my balcony and think it is under the order Mecoptera. I tried to catch it to give to donate to the entomology department at the University of Sydney because I know they don’t have many.
I am very interested in knowing what type of insect it is because I spent 3 months catching insect for my entomology major work and just handed it in. Shame I didn’t find one 3 week earlier!
Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Ethan

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Dear Ethan,
This is definitely NOT a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera.  It is a True Fly in the order Diptera, and we believe it is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We believe it might be a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, which is pictured on Brisbane Insects where it states:  “The Giant Blue Robber Fly has the relatively small head, legs are not long but with board abdomen. The body and legs is covered with short grey hairs. Whole body, includes eyes, abdomen and legs are in dark steel blue colour. Pair of Wings are tinted in steel blue as well. “

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge flying bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Tennessee
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 03:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What the heck is this thing? My parents were on a bus trip to Tennessee and this huge thing flew by- the only noise was the beating of its wings which reminded them of a hummingbird’s wings because it hovered.
How you want your letter signed:  tay2247

Hover Fly

Dear tay2247.
This looks to us like a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, possibly a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, commonly called a Good News Bee.  They are harmless.

Thank you- I was leaning towards that- it just seemed bigger than what the descriptions said.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis in SE Michigan
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Michigan
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These (2) are in my yard.  The immediate area is a vernal marsh area, with swamp milkweed.  They are not on the milkweed, but it is close by.
How you want your letter signed:  Bill Jones

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis

Dear Bill,
Physically, this appears to be a Monarch chrysalis, however the color is not normal.  A normal Monarch chrysalis is bright green with gold flecks, and as it nears the time for the adult to emerge, the orange wings appears through the exoskeleton.  Your chrysalis appears to have fallen prey to a parasite, probably a Tachinid Fly like the chrysalis pictured on Monarch Lover

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  robber fly id
Geographic location of the bug:  barnegat new jersey
Date: 10/14/2018
Time: 08:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  giant robber fly – asilidae family. but what genus species? promachus?? seent at cloverdale farm county park 7/28/18. i always have robber fly questions, any resources for field guides or at least to narrow down genera in nj?
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe you are correct that this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, and it looks most like Promachus hinei based on this BugGuide image, but that species is only reported as far east as Ohio on BugGuide.  It might be the same species as your previous submission.  You can try submitting your images to BugGuide to see if the network of contributors there can provide you with a species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination