Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, Victoria, Dandenong
Date: 04/12/2021
Time: 05:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello bugman,
I’m curious about what this bug is. I have found a few in my shed. Any help will be greatly appreciated. A small donation haha.
Cheers
How you want your letter signed:  Nathan

Wingless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Nathan,
This is a wingless female Soldier Fly in the subfamily Chiromyzinae, and the first time we ever saw one of these, it had us puzzled for quite some time.  There are numerous images posted to iNaturalist.

Wingless Female Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Maybe a new bug specie
Geographic location of the bug:  Montreal, Cote-des-Neiges Minto appartments,Quebec,Canada
Date: 04/13/2021
Time: 03:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I may have found a new bug, I search images of it but found none, i am still 11 years old i found it away from grass, It seemed to move, It had a long black nose like a needle, 2 front legs and 2 back legs they were skinny I don’t know if he had 4 or 6 legs, it ha black and clear wings, it was very small and was fuzzy, it was all yellow/beige but in its back it was a black circle, it did no harm and when we touched it ,it moved but didn’t fly away.I found it with my little sister.
How you want your letter signed:  Lilya (the future scientist)

Bee Fly

Dear Lilya (the future scientist),
First let me congratulate you on knowing that you want to be a scientist at such a young age.  This is actually a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, most likely the Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “A common and widespread bee fly, often seen taking nectar on early spring wildflowers or seen hovering in sunny patches in woodlands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What can be this “larva”?
Geographic location of the bug:  Madrid city, NE
Date: 03/28/2021
Time: 01:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There are lots of this larva (I think that it is a larva, but not sure, perhaps a chrysalis) at my parents flat roof. Many of them near to an open box with compost. Some of them looks alive, some of them are “emtpy”. It is the first time that something like that appears there.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Chris,
These are Black Soldier Fly larvae and they are often found in compost piles.  They are harmless and are actually considered beneficial as they help to break down the organic materials in the compost pile.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Botfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Byron center MI
Date: 07/19/2020
Time: 11:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe this is a type of botfly?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan

Rabbit Bot Fly

Hi Evan,
You are correct that this is a Bot Fly, and thanks to this image, we believe it is
Cuterebra abdominalis which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the host is cottontail rabbits.  Your images are awesome.

Rabbit Bot Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bumble Bee mimicking hoverfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New York
Date: 07/16/2020
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
I was startled by what I thought was a bumblebee in my bedroom, until I started to scoop it up in a glass and carry it outside, and I realized it was something like a monstrous horsefly. After some internet searching, I see it is a hover fly, but cannot seem to find this species. For scale, the wires are half an inch apart.
Thanks for any help!
How you want your letter signed:  Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Shoo Fly,
This is actually a Rodent Bot Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black fly, yellow stripe on head
Geographic location of the bug:  Westfield, MA, USA
Date: 07/11/2020
Time: 01:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have a hybrid hydrangea that blooms through July.  Some days there are many dozens of insects enjoying the blooms.  I cannot identify this one.
How you want your letter signed:  Steveb

Featherlegged Fly

Dear Steveb,
This is one of the parasitoid Tachinid Flies in the genus
Trichopoda which are known as the Featherlegged Flies, and it is probably Trichopoda lanipes which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it preys on Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination