Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  robber fly id
Geographic location of the bug:  barnegat new jersey
Date: 10/14/2018
Time: 08:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  giant robber fly – asilidae family. but what genus species? promachus?? seent at cloverdale farm county park 7/28/18. i always have robber fly questions, any resources for field guides or at least to narrow down genera in nj?
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe you are correct that this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, and it looks most like Promachus hinei based on this BugGuide image, but that species is only reported as far east as Ohio on BugGuide.  It might be the same species as your previous submission.  You can try submitting your images to BugGuide to see if the network of contributors there can provide you with a species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Robber fly type
Geographic location of the bug:  monmouth county, new jersey
Date: 10/10/2018
Time: 04:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey i am looking through archived photos and i would love more specific input on this robber fly. is it possible to id genus/species from this photo. taken mid june 2016. at the time i thought hanging thief but that’s as far as i got. thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  WS

Giant Robber Fly

Dear WS,
We believe this is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, but we are not certain of the species.  See BugGuide for examples.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden metallic fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia, usa
Date: 10/07/2018
Time: 09:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you ID this very shiny golden fly? I am at a loss.
How you want your letter signed:  Virginia farm bugwatcher

Gold Hover Fly

Dear Virginia far bugwatcher,
We have not had any luck in our initial search for an identity, but the large eyes lead us to believe this is a male member of the species.  The antennae are also quite distinctive.  Our initial instinct is that this might be a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, but a BugGuide search of that family did not turn up any matching images.  How large was this individual?  We are posting your request and perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist with the identification.

Thank you for this response!
It was a fairly large fly, larger than a housefly but smaller than a honeybee.
I think it is quite beautiful. I hope some one knows what it is.
Eric Eaton responds to our request for assistance.
Hi, Daniel:

Eristalinus aeneus is the species.  Those eyes are really something!
Eric
Ed. Note:  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, adventive in NA and now widespread in e. NA (ON-FL)” and “In Europe, larvae often found associated with decaying seaweed.”

You rock!!
This makes me very happy. Thank you,
Nell
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Mississippi
Date: 10/03/2018
Time: 04:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this thing? Is it dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Judy

Bot Fly

Dear Judy,
This is a Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra, and it poses no threat to humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and ‘runs’ of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.” We will attempt to contact Jeff Boettner to see if he can provide any species information.

Bot Fly

Thank you! I’ve heard of bot flies….mainly on Dr. Pol. Never thought I’d see one. I appreciate your help.
Judy
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Good News Bee!
Geographic location of the bug:  Smithville, Tennessee
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 11:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Daniel, your site allowed me to identify this great bug as a Good News Bee!  Loved the story about it.  Thought you might enjoy this great picture.
How you want your letter signed:  James Davison

Good News Bee

Dear James,
Your image of a Yellowjacket Hover Fly or Good News Bee is a wonderful addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Klipheuwel, Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/01/2018
Time: 06:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this insect at a wetland in Klipheuwel, near Cape Town.  It is an agricultural area. Farming practices include wheat, oats and live stock farming (cattle and sheep).
How you want your letter signed:  Tania Morkel

Yellow Dung Fly

Dear Tania,
It is a Fly, order Diptera. Not sure of family.  We need more time to research.

Yellow Dung Fly

Many thanks Daniel
An entomologist from my University just confirmed that it is Scathophaga stercoraria (Yellow dung fly).
Kind regards
Tania Morkel
Hi again Tania,
Thanks for getting back to us with a correct identification.  We found images of the Yellow Dung Fly on Wildlife Insight, but we also found the species, with the common name Golden Dung Fly, on BugGuide, a North American site, where it states the range is “throughout North America and the world.”
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination