Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Egg display
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulf Coast
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Found this lovely little display on my patio today. Any chance you know who may have left it?
How you want your letter signed:  A.

Lacewing Eggs

Dear A.,
These are Lacewing Eggs.

Thank you! We love your site and appreciate your help!
A.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sperm cillia
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisiana
Date: 10/12/2017
Time: 07:45 PM EDT
I found these organisms attached to multiple surfaces outside my home.  It hides and  attaches itself underneath wood, metal, and plastic. The way they arrange themselves is unique and of different patterns
How you want your letter signed:  T. Myers

Lacewing Eggs

Dear T. Myers,
The female Lacewing has evolved so that she lays her eggs on stalks to help prevent the ravenous larvae from devouring one another when they hatch.  Young Lacewings are called Aphid Wolves.

Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect lays these eggs?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, South East Queensland
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
I’ve been seeing these little clusters of tiny white eggs on long slender stalks in odd places around the house eg, on the internal stairwell, bathroom window, etc. They really are tiny, the whole cluster covers an area no larger than a thumbnail & the eggs are smaller than poppy seeds.  In this pic it looks like they’ve hatched.. What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Renee,
We are nearly certain these are Lacewing Eggs, but we won’t rule out they might be the Eggs of a different member of the order Neuroptera.  Lacewings have extremely predatory larvae, and they have evolved to lay eggs in this manner to help ensure higher survival rates so the hatchling larvae don’t cannibalize each other.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma City,  Oklahoma
Date: 10/08/2017
Time: 02:07 PM EDT
Hi! I have searuched and searched but cannot find out what these are. Found then on a leaf of my Schefflera arboricola, outside on back patio.  They are hard and about .5mm. Please help! Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Brenda Horn

Katydid Eggs

Dear Brenda,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are relatives of Grasshoppers and Crickets that are among the greatest musicians in the insect world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small Clear Blobby Gobs
Geographic location of the bug:  British Columbia, Canada
Date: 10/04/2017
Time: 05:16 PM EDT
Dear Bugman,
I found these little group of clear globby things on some potted soil under another pot of soil I had placed there weeks before.  I assume they are larvae of some sort but there were no markings that I could see indicative of what they were.  Do you know?
How you want your letter signed:  Bugs in BC

Slug Eggs

Our money is on these being Slug Eggs based on this BugGuide posting.

Eww!  Thank you!  My daughter is happy!
Tracy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown egg deposits
Geographic location of the bug:  Riverside County, California
Date: 10/05/2017
Time: 01:54 PM EDT
I have found what are apparently eggs deposited on my containerized blueberry plants in Inland Empire California. I observed no apparent adult responsible, but as you can see there is both stem and leaf damage. The web is from a spider that is presently throughout my gardens. Would appreciate any identification guidance, and any tips for management in the instance that this vector may damage crops.
Incidentally we have not previously observed these eggs in this area.
How you want your letter signed:  Agricola

Katydid Eggs

Dear Agricola,
These are Katydid Eggs, and we believe they are most likely Angle-Wing Katydid Eggs based on this BugGuide image.  Many young Katydids are omnivorous and they might help control other insect pests that are found on your plants, but Katydids also eat leaves and flowers.  They are rarely plentiful enough to do any permanent damage to plants, but tell that to a rose grower whose prize bud gets chewed by a Katydid.  We tolerate Katydids in our own garden as we enjoy the “music” provided by the adult insects.

Awesome! Thanks for the feedback. I’ll be listening for their cousins!
Thx/ GEO
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination