Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Raspberry leaf
July 17, 2015 2:06 pm
I found these on the back on a raspberry leaf from a plant I bought a few weeks ago. I’m guessing they’re stink bug babies, but not idea what type! Any help identifying them would be great. I’m located just outside of Bristol in the south-West of England
Signature: Lisa

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Lisa,
As you suspected, these are hatchling Stink Bugs, and they bear a striking resemblance to hatchling Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs,
Halyomorpha halys, which you can verify by comparing to this image on BugGuide. We are well aware of the rapid spread of this invasive Asian species in North America, but we did not know of any UK sightings, so we did some research.  According to a November 2014 posting on BBC News:  “An agricultural pest dubbed the stink bug could establish itself within the UK, according to a scientist.  Entomologist Max Barclay said it was ‘it is only a matter of time’ before the brown marmorated stink bug arrives in the country.  Two of the insects have already been found on imported timber headed for Britain.  The bug, which is native to the Far East, has already reached France and Germany.  Mr Barclay, from London’s Natural History Museum, told the Daily Mail newspaper: ‘I think the brown marmorated stink bug will establish a population here. It is only a matter of time.  It will make its presence felt fairly quickly because it comes into people’s homes in the autumn and winter.’  Its name comes from the putrid stench it releases from its glands when threatened.  The insect was first found in the US in the late 1990s, but has now spread across much of the country. Since then, it has become a severe pest of fruits, vegetables and ornamental plants.”  You might want to report this sighting to your local agricultural agency.  It is possible that the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug eggs were on the raspberry plant when you purchased it, or it is also possible that they are already established, but passing unnoticed in your area.  It is also possible that this is a different species of Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Roach or what?
Location: Georgetown Texas
July 16, 2015 9:46 pm
We found this in our house in Texas. Any ideas?
Signature: Jen

Female Boll's Sandroach with Ootheca

Female Boll’s Sandroach with Ootheca

Dear Jen,
While this is a Cockroach, the good news is that it is not a species that infests homes.  This female Boll’s Sandroach,
Arenivaga bolliana, is basically an outdoor species and she must have accidentally wandered into your home.  We would urge you to relocate her outside.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The downy females have no wings and burrow in the dust under houses and in natural rock shelters where they feed on packrat droppings.  This large roach is also present in abandoned Atta texana [Texas leaf-cutter ant] tunnels and in chambers filled with nest refuse.”  Your female Boll’s Sandroach is carrying an ootheca or egg case.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large wood boring beetle?
Location: Akron, Ohio
July 2, 2015 10:10 pm
I found this 2 inch long bug yesterday crawling through the grass. We at first thought it might be Hardwood Stump Borer, but now I’m thinking it’s a Broad-Necked Root Borer. All my info coming from bug books and the internet.
Today it started laying eggs in the bottom on the jar. The kids were fascinated! I have hardwood trees as well as apple trees and grape vines. I don’t want to release it if it is going to be damaging to my trees, but I don’t want it to suffer either. If I can find what kind of beetle it is, then I can feed it or release it elsewhere. I also, could let it go once it’s done laying eggs, (unless it mates and lays eggs multiple times).
Here is a picture of the top of the beetle, the bottom, and some with the eggs (they look kind of like rice).
Signature: Sharon

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Dear Sharon,
This is a Broad-Necked Root Borer.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are inserted into ground (or under litter) in groups. Larvae tunnel downward to feed on living roots of a variety of trees and shrubs. At first they may feed on bark, but then proceed to hollow out small roots. Pupation occurs in spring, about 10 cm under the ground. Life cycle probably three years.”
  There is no indication that the feeding habits of the larvae compromise the life of a healthy tree as they feed on the small roots only.  Many gardeners feel that trimming roots helps to stimulate new growth.  We would advise you to release this magnificent beetle.  Thank you for supplying an image with the eggs.  Some female insects emerge from pupation so filled with eggs that they release some unfertilized eggs to enable them to fly better.

Broad-Necked Root Borer lays Eggs

Broad-Necked Root Borer lays Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What am I?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 5, 2015 10:13 pm
Can’t seem to find what this guy is.
Signature: Heather Cookson

Mystery Thing

Horse Fly Egg Mass

Dear Heather,
Your mystery thing has us quite stumped.  It does not look like an insect, but it appears that it might have been produced by an insect.  We do not believe this is an egg mass, but it might be some type of shelter.  The “scales” look somewhat like seeds.  Could you please provide more details on where it was found and regarding its size.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some valuable information.

Update:  Horse Fly Egg Mass
Immediately after posting, we received a comment identifying this as a Tabanid or Horse Fly Egg Mass, and a link to BugGuide.  Mystery solved thanks to a diligent reader. 

Eric Eaton Confirms
Hi, Daniel:
That is a batch of horse fly or deer fly eggs.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this insect
Location: western Maryland
May 27, 2015 7:07 am
Wondering if this was another type of Dobson fly. was laying eggs in clumps on leaves beside the river. North branch Potomac river.
Signature: jordan

Dark Fishfly Laying Eggs

Dark Fishfly Laying Eggs

Hi Jordan,
Your Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia is classified in the same order as a Dobsonfly.  We believe your individual is Nigronia fasciata based on comparing the markings on the wings to individuals posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hard Shell Mystery
Location: Silver Lake (Los Angeles)
May 24, 2015 4:39 pm
Hi Daniel
A neighbor noticed this disturbingly large hard shelled , something on my fence this afternoon. About 2 1/2″ long, 3/4″ wide , 1/3″ deep. A pupae perhaps? The neighbor poked w/ a stick & it fell off (although it was stuck to the fence quite well), and we lost it in the leaf matter. There’s something very prehistoric about it. Never seen anything like it before.
Signature: Diane E

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Diane,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Mantis, and we believe it might be that of a native California Mantis based on these images on BugGuide.  It looks to us like the Ootheca has hatched, likely releasing several hundred tiny Mantids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination