Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s in my web?
Geographic location of the bug:  Camarillo, Ca near succulents
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was outdoors enjoying some fresh air and succulents  and noticed a pretty substantial spider web plus these very interesting white spiky spheres. I’m wondering if you can identify them?
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Brown Widow Egg Sacs

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
These are the Egg Sacs of a Brown Widow Spider, a species recently introduced to North America from Africa.  The Brown Widow is a relative of the native Western Black Widow, and since the introduction of the Brown Widow, populations of native Western Black Widows seem to have diminished, perhaps being displaced by a more competitive relative.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of “nest” might this be?
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern shore of maryland
Date: 04/29/2018
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you help identify if this is an insect or bees nest?  It’s fairly small.  Less than an inch long and less than a half inch wide.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbie

Wheel Bug Eggs

Dear Bobbie,
These sure look like Wheel Bug Eggs and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  This is the time of year we begin to get identification requests for hatchling Wheel Bugs.  Wheel Bugs are predatory Assassin Bugs that are beneficial in the home garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kirby uk on crabapple tree leaf
Date: 04/09/2018
Time: 02:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi do you know what these are?
How you want your letter signed:  N medley

Vapourer Moth Eggs

Dear N medley,
These are Vapourer Moth Eggs, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to the images on Alamy and Alex Hyde Photography.  According to UK Moths:  “An unusual species in many ways, the males fly during the day but are often also attracted to light at night.  The females are virtually wingless, an attribute normally associated with winter-emerging species, but the adults are out from July to September, sometimes October in the south.  The female lays her eggs on what remains of the pupal cocoon, which then overwinter. When hatched, the very hairy caterpillars feed on a range of deciduous trees and shrubs.  The species is fairly common, especially in suburban habitats, over much of Britain, but more so in the south.”

Thank you so much! We’ll leave it alone then, but I suppose we may want to move some of the caterpillars off of our little tree!
best, Nancy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery Eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  Riverside, CA
Date: 04/03/2018
Time: 06:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey there!
I was working over my grandmother’s weeded lawn and came across the white raspberry looking mass in the photo. It was buries about 2 inches below the soil in a cluster of weed roots.
Any idea what it would be?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  The Unintentional Gardener

Slug Eggs

Dear Unintentional Gardener,
These are the eggs of a Garden Slug.  According to Bumblebee.org:  “The eggs are sticky, pearly white, found in clumps, and really very pretty. You can just make out the bodies of the slugs floating in their rich supply of albumin. They are commonly found in compost bins and under plant pot saucers. They need to be in a moist environment to survive.”  There are other supporting images on Rural Ramblings and on Naturally Curious with Mary Holland where it states:  “The eggs of both snails and slugs are tiny, white or cream-colored, round and laid in roughly one-inch diameter clusters of 30 or so eggs. Look for these clusters under rotting logs, where they are protected from drying out as well as from freezing.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tre killing Weirdo Thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles, CA
Date: 12/23/2017
Time: 09:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello sir,
This weirdo cocoon(?) is on our Silver Sheen Pittosporum tree. We’ve been puzzled about it for a few months now. I woke up this morning thinking about it, I’m concerned that it might be harmful to the tree, as four of these trees have mysteriously died in the past year.  Is this the culprit?
Thank you for your time!
How you want your letter signed:  No, thank you.

Mantis Ootheca

This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis and it is not responsible for the death of your trees.  Mantids are predators that are often used by organic gardeners to control insect pests without the use of pesticides.

Thank you, Daniel. We didn’t hear from you guys, so we brought it inside. We put it in a terrarium and about three weeks ago, 20 aliens popped out. They were adorable.
My question now, are these predators a threat to the Monarch and Gulf Fritillary caterpillars that we raise?
Thank you,
Mike

Hi Mike,
Your original request arrived when our editorial staff was on holiday and we never seem to catch up on requests when we are away from the office.  We do not believe native California Mantids are a threat to either your Monarch or Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars, but Mantids will eat pollinating insects including Bees.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug or fossil?
Geographic location of the bug:  Saw Washington state
Date: 02/19/2018
Time: 02:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have no idea what this is. It was found in Southwest Washington state and is the second one we found. The first one was a couple months ago this one was just found a couple days ago (that would be early February). At first I thought it was a fossil but now I’m not so sure. If you can’t tell me what it is do you know who I might ask that’s local to Southwest Washington?
How you want your letter signed:  M.c.hlousek

Mantis Ootheca

Dear M.c.hlousek,
This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis, but we cannot say for certain if it is a native species or a species introduced for agricultural purposes.  When conditions are correct, you should expect young mantids to hatch and begin hunting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination