Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Who’s nest is that
Geographic location of the bug:  UK, Houghton Regis
Date: 11/11/2017
Time: 02:00 PM EDT
Found this nest in my garden and wonder who’s it can be
How you want your letter signed:  Delfina

Vapourer Eggs

Dear Delfina,
These are the eggs of The Vapourer,
Orgyia antiqua, a species we found on Nature Spot where it states:  “The female lays her eggs on what remains of the pupal cocoon, which then overwinter. When hatched, the very hairy caterpillars feed on a range of deciduous trees and shrubs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope egg cases, black widow?
Geographic location of the bug:  Memphis, TN
Date: 10/19/2017
Time: 01:25 PM EDT
The argiope I sent a photo of in March disappeared (died/was eaten?) a week or two ago. I thought you might want to see the egg cases she left for next spring.
I also include a photo of what I believe is a black widow. (I couldn’t get a shot of the side with the red on it.)
How you want your letter signed:  Laurel

Egg Sacs of a Golden Orbweaver

Dear Laurel,
We did receive an image of a Golden Orbweaver from you in August.  Thanks for sending images of her egg sacs.  Orbweavers are short-lived spiders, living only a single season.  Your other spider does appear to be a Widow. 

Sorry about the date mix-up. I first saw the spider in March.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Egg display
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulf Coast
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Found this lovely little display on my patio today. Any chance you know who may have left it?
How you want your letter signed:  A.

Lacewing Eggs

Dear A.,
These are Lacewing Eggs.

Thank you! We love your site and appreciate your help!
A.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sperm cillia
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisiana
Date: 10/12/2017
Time: 07:45 PM EDT
I found these organisms attached to multiple surfaces outside my home.  It hides and  attaches itself underneath wood, metal, and plastic. The way they arrange themselves is unique and of different patterns
How you want your letter signed:  T. Myers

Lacewing Eggs

Dear T. Myers,
The female Lacewing has evolved so that she lays her eggs on stalks to help prevent the ravenous larvae from devouring one another when they hatch.  Young Lacewings are called Aphid Wolves.

Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect lays these eggs?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, South East Queensland
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
I’ve been seeing these little clusters of tiny white eggs on long slender stalks in odd places around the house eg, on the internal stairwell, bathroom window, etc. They really are tiny, the whole cluster covers an area no larger than a thumbnail & the eggs are smaller than poppy seeds.  In this pic it looks like they’ve hatched.. What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Renee,
We are nearly certain these are Lacewing Eggs, but we won’t rule out they might be the Eggs of a different member of the order Neuroptera.  Lacewings have extremely predatory larvae, and they have evolved to lay eggs in this manner to help ensure higher survival rates so the hatchling larvae don’t cannibalize each other.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma City,  Oklahoma
Date: 10/08/2017
Time: 02:07 PM EDT
Hi! I have searuched and searched but cannot find out what these are. Found then on a leaf of my Schefflera arboricola, outside on back patio.  They are hard and about .5mm. Please help! Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Brenda Horn

Katydid Eggs

Dear Brenda,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are relatives of Grasshoppers and Crickets that are among the greatest musicians in the insect world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination