Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantis Ootheca and adult, female California Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 10/08/2018
Time: 5:30 PM PDT
We have a long overdue update on our She’s a Man-Eater posting.  Several days after the mating and cannibalistic meal that followed on our porchlight, Daniel relocated the female California Mantis in the genus
Stagmomantis (not sure if species is S. californica or S. limbata as both species are reported from Los Angeles) to the plum trees in back, and after a day, we could no longer find her, but we did locate this ootheca in the branches not far from where we released her.

Mantis Ootheca

Then we found a female Mantis nearby, but we cannot say for certain she is the same individual.  Now that January has arrived, the ootheca is still in place and it has still not hatched.

Female California Mantis

Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Insect Egg ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama City Beach, FL 32408
Date: 01/03/2019
Time: 09:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Please help me identify this ‘insect egg’ found while weeding my yard two blocks from the Gulf of Mexico in Panams Cuty Beach, FL. Yard is sand w/ indigenous plants/weeds. Thanks ! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Angela

Green Plastic Ball

Dear Angela,
Though you only refer to a “green insect egg”, your images indicate you also encountered a similar yellow object.  We do not believe these are naturally occurring objects.  Rather, we believe they are plastic spheres of some unknown use.  The yellow object even appears to have a seam where this object was removed from a mold.

Yellow Plastic Sphere

Thank you !

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge possible moth egg cluster
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland, Oregon
Date: 01/05/2019
Time: 09:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  At first I thought this 4-tine garden cultivator had rusted solid from being left outdoors, but upon closer inspection I realized it was entirely covered in dark orange eggs! I think they might be moth eggs. No eggs were present on the wooden handle.
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Slime Mold we believe

Dear Pam,
Thanks for sending in this fascinating mystery.  While these red “things” do seem to resemble insect eggs, we have our doubts because of the varying size of the individual “eggs.”  We would expect much more regularity in the size of eggs.  Here is a somewhat similar looking image of Slime Mold that we found online and Dave’s Blog has a similar image.  We also found Slime Mole images that look similar on FlickR and on the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources site.  We are inclined to identify them as Slime Mold.

Slime Mole we believe

Oh wow! Thank you so much, I would never have considered a mold, I have never seen anything like it before!
Also, Thank you so much for your blog, I have been using it to identify random “bugs” that I have found for over 10 years, starting when I was just a teenager. It has been an invaluable resource for me.

Slime Mold we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What are these strange pods?
Geographic location of the bug:  NSW, Australia
Date: 12/26/2018
Time: 03:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have these brown pod things in my cupboard outside. They’re about as wide as my finger and are stuck to the underside of a shelf lengthways. They appeared a few days ago. It is summer.
How you want your letter signed:  Should I be afraid?

Probably Katydid Eggs

Dear Should I be afraid?
Though your image lacks critical sharpness, we nonetheless believe these are Katydid Eggs.  Here is an image from Bower Bird of Australian Katydid Eggs.  Katydids are similar to Grasshoppers, and they will feed on plants in the garden, but they should not cause you any fear, though large individuals, especially predatory species, can have powerful mandibles that could conceivably deliver a painful bite, so they should be handled with caution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this egg on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 07:32 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest time is fast approaching, and I am inspecting my colas for dreaded Budworms, and I have learned to recognize their eggs, but I noticed a few different eggs I would like identified.  They are on a stalk.
Thanks for your time.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Lacewing Egg

Dear Constant Gardener,
We suspect we will get a few comments from our readers regarding the content of your image, but the stalked egg in the lower left corner was laid by a Green Lacewing.  Green Lacewings are predators, and their larvae are commonly called Aphid Wolves.

Mel Frank Comments
Yes, they are all over my plants, every year. It’s one of the reasons I have had only very minor insect infestations and is a main reason I don’t use insecticides–I don’t want to kill the biological helpers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope bruennichi?
Geographic location of the bug:  São Brás, Algarve, Portugal
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We spotted this spider on the wall outside the door of a villa we were staying in, in the Algarve in Portugal – a very remote location surrounded by nothing but olive groves and hills, accessible only by a dirt road. It appeared quite suddenly in the morning, as we were leaving, and we hadn’t noticed it before anywhere inside or outside during our week-long stay. We’ve never seen a spider like this in Portugal before (usually just lots of lizards and the odd snake!), especially not with  an almost crab-like body and a nest/egg sac? A little Googling suggests it might be a wasp spider, but do you know for sure?
Thank you for your time and for any help you can give!
All the best,
Amelia

Orbweaver

Dear Amelia,
In our opinion, you have the genus correct but not the species for your Orbweaver.  We believe, based on this Age Fotostock image that your spider is
Argiope lobata.  Images on iNaturalist and ArachnoPhoto support that ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination