Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  some type of wolf spider
Geographic location of the bug:  arvada,co
Date: 07/10/2018
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i found this at a creek in arvada.i believe it is some type of wolf spider but id lile a more detailed identification. you might notice the egg sac shes holding in her fangs, she laid it ahout a week after i found her. ive had her for around three weeks.
How you want your letter signed:  Alex

Female Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Alex,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, not a Wolf Spider.  Both Fishing Spiders and Wolf Spiders have well documented maternal behavior, and both transport an egg sac after producing it.  The Wolf Spiders drag the egg sac from the spinnerets, and when the spiderlings hatch, they crawl on the body of the female for several days before eventually dispersing.  Fishing Spiders carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs as your image illustrates, and like other Nursery Web Spiders, they will eventually construct a nursery web that they guard when they find a location that is appropriate.  Dolomedes scriptus is reported from Colorado according to BugGuide, and the individual in this BugGuide image has markings very much like your Spider, so we believe that species is correct.   Fishing Spiders are often found near water, and adult Fishing Spiders are capable of capturing aquatic prey, including small fish.

Fishing Spider

thank you SO much! this was very helpful and I am very impressed in how quickly you got back to me. have a wonderful day!

Fishing Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Casually Laying Eggs on the Window
Geographic location of the bug:  Manila, Philippines
Date: 07/04/2018
Time: 06:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I was going down the house to get some water when I noticed this creature on our window. I was fascinated by the way it was orderly laying its eggs. I’d love to know what kind of insect it is, especially if it’s harmless or not (because laying that much eggs isn’t a good omen by any means).
How you want your letter signed:  Cockroach lookalike fearing girl

True Bug laying Eggs

Dear Cockroach lookalike fearing girl,
A species identification will be difficult for us without a dorsal view of this egg laying True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera.  We believe this might be a Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae based on the similarity of these Squash Bug eggs pictured on Getty Images and the eggs in your image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this clutch?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Ontario
Date: 06/21/2018
Time: 08:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looked up and saw this on a Norway Maple leaf.  Moist to the touch.   Looked like a fat little moth.  Actually made of overlaid cylindrical units.  Egg clutch?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Horse Fly Eggs

Dear Mike,
These sure look like Horse Fly eggs to us.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to Purdue University:  “Females search for a place to lay a single mass of eggs consisting of 100-800 eggs, depending on the species. Egg masses of most species that have been studied are laid on the underside of leaves or along the stems of emergent vegetation growing in wetlands. Hatching occurs in approximately 2-3 days, and newly emerged larvae drop down into water or saturated soil in which they feed and develop.” 

Horse Fly Eggs

Thanks! No water near there for the larvae to drop into and mine were a silvery-blue colour (vs the pic; likely varies anyway, right?) but if it’s any of those bitey buggers (Tabanidae), then I don’t feel bad for disturbing it.  Now I know.  Tough to pick the keywords to search these things.  You all do a very cool service.  Great site too. Thanks again.
Mike
Hi again Mike,
Online images of Horse Fly eggs do vary in color.  Larvae of some species will develop in damp soil.
On subsequent inspection, it seems that egg mass must have just been fresh; thus the bright colour.  They dried to a dark brown/black.
Thanks for providing that additional information.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s in my web?
Geographic location of the bug:  Camarillo, Ca near succulents
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was outdoors enjoying some fresh air and succulents  and noticed a pretty substantial spider web plus these very interesting white spiky spheres. I’m wondering if you can identify them?
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Brown Widow Egg Sacs

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
These are the Egg Sacs of a Brown Widow Spider, a species recently introduced to North America from Africa.  The Brown Widow is a relative of the native Western Black Widow, and since the introduction of the Brown Widow, populations of native Western Black Widows seem to have diminished, perhaps being displaced by a more competitive relative.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of “nest” might this be?
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern shore of maryland
Date: 04/29/2018
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you help identify if this is an insect or bees nest?  It’s fairly small.  Less than an inch long and less than a half inch wide.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbie

Wheel Bug Eggs

Dear Bobbie,
These sure look like Wheel Bug Eggs and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  This is the time of year we begin to get identification requests for hatchling Wheel Bugs.  Wheel Bugs are predatory Assassin Bugs that are beneficial in the home garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kirby uk on crabapple tree leaf
Date: 04/09/2018
Time: 02:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi do you know what these are?
How you want your letter signed:  N medley

Vapourer Moth Eggs

Dear N medley,
These are Vapourer Moth Eggs, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to the images on Alamy and Alex Hyde Photography.  According to UK Moths:  “An unusual species in many ways, the males fly during the day but are often also attracted to light at night.  The females are virtually wingless, an attribute normally associated with winter-emerging species, but the adults are out from July to September, sometimes October in the south.  The female lays her eggs on what remains of the pupal cocoon, which then overwinter. When hatched, the very hairy caterpillars feed on a range of deciduous trees and shrubs.  The species is fairly common, especially in suburban habitats, over much of Britain, but more so in the south.”

Thank you so much! We’ll leave it alone then, but I suppose we may want to move some of the caterpillars off of our little tree!
best, Nancy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination