Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: West Los Angeles sighting – Monarch 1
Location: West Los Angeles
July 6, 2017 8:26 am
Hi Bugman,
Here’s the first set of pictures of Monarchs
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Mating Monarch Butterflies

Dear Jeff,
Thank you so much for sending your gorgeous images documenting the complete life cycle of the Monarch butterfly.  It is going to take us a healthy chunk of time to format all your images and set up the posting properly so we are just starting by posting an image of a mating pair of Monarchs.  The male is the individual with the open wings, and the female appears to have been tagged because her hind wings have what appears to be an inked marking.  We can also identify the male, according to BugGuide, because:  “Males have scent-scale patches on hindwings, prominent when wings are open, and just possible to see when wings are folded.”  Over the course of the day, we hope to get all your excellent images added to the posting.

Male Monarch

Hi Daniel,
I don’t have complete life cycles for the rest of the butterflies that have graced our back yard, but I’ll send in what I have.  Regarding the Marine Blue, I can resend them with the other pics.  The ones I sent seemed to have unusual coloring.
By the way, I want to thank you for so graciously accepting my pictures.  It makes me happy to be able to share them.
Jeff

Female Monarch

Nectaring Monarchs

Ovipositing Female Monarch

Monarch Egg

Monarch Caterpillar Hatchling

Monarch Caterpillar

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Monarch Chrysalis

Monarch Chrysalis (adult about to emerge)

Newly Eclosed Monarch

Emerged Adult Monarch

Monarch Nursery

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: white oak borer with eggs
Location: Troy, VA
July 3, 2017 11:32 am
I took this photo and when I looked more closely I discovered there were eggs in the picture. I don’t know if the eggs are from the beetle or the other bugs that were nearby. I believe this to be a white oak borer.
(I just sent another image and should have mentioned that I don’t think the giant beetle in the photo is a hercules beetle. I hope you have time to take a look at it.)
thanks again
Signature: Grace Pedalino

White Oak Borer

Dear Grace,
Thanks for sending in your image of a White Oak Borer.  We do not believe the eggs belong to the Borer.  We believe the eggs are Tiger Moth Eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egg cluster on fence
Location: Maryland USA
June 3, 2017 9:57 am
Hello,
Can you identify this egg cluster? Found in late May after a somewhat rainy period. On the east side of the fence, our wind typically comes from the west
Looks like Mother Nature has OCD too!
Thanks!
Signature: Barb

Probably Moth Eggs

Dear Barb,
Eggs can be very difficult to identify.  Our best guess on this is that they are some type of Moth Egg, possibly a Tiger Moth.  We are certain they are not the eggs of a Painted Tiger Moth as it is a western species, but this BugGuide image would also be similar to the eggs of Tiger Moths found in the eastern parts of North America.  We are post-dating your submission to go live to our site later in the month when our editorial staff is out of the office on holiday.

Thanks for the speedy reply, Daniel!!
Was wondering if the eggs would hatch if I scrape some off into a container and keep in similar conditions?
Thanks again !!
Barb

Hi Barb,
That might work, but scraping them from the fence might damage them.  We are curious if there is some reason you don’t want to leave them on the fence and just let nature take its course.

Actually, I’d be more apt to leave them, just curious if a couple might hatch successfully but I’ll leave them.  My college entomology days are long past, lol.
Barb

Hi again Barb,
By all means, try removing a few.  Tiger Moths often make the egg shell their first meal.  Many Tiger Moth Caterpillars are general feeders that will eat a wide variety of “weed” plants. 

Mother Nature was also fast, I went out there about 3pm yesterday and the eggs were gone.  Lots of weed plants for them to feast on here, we don’t use any lawn chemicals because of the dogs, but the insects have to watch out for our 7 Guinea fowl.
Thanks again for your identification help!!!
Regards,
Barb
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Our editorial staff will be on holiday for a few weeks, so we are post-dating submissions to go live during our absence.  We hope you enjoy this gorgeous series of images of the life cycle of the Anise Swallowtail

Subject: West Los Angeles sighting – Anise Swallow Tail #1
Location: West Los Angeles
June 1, 2017 12:19 pm
Hi Daniel,
Here’s the first of my sets of pictures you asked me to trickle in. Since I can attach only 3 images, I’m going to send in 4 sets for the swallow tail. If this is too much, please let me know.
Hope you enjoy these.
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Anise Swallowtail Eggs

Thanks Jeff,
We will put together a nice life cycle posting with the images you have sent.  We will distill them down to the best images and we will postdate your submission so it goes live during our absence mid month.  We feel we have to provide you with a challenge though.  Your spectacular life cycle images are lacking critical two stages.  We hope someday you can capture the actual emergence of the adult from the chrysalis, and of course, we always love to post images of mating insects to our Bug Love page.

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar: Early Instar

Newly hatched Anise Swallowtails somewhat resemble bird droppings which may help to camouflage them from predators.

Anise Swallowtail Caterpillars

As they grow and molt, later instars of the Anise Swallowtail Caterillar take on the characteristic green color with black and yellow spots.

Anise Swallowtail with Osmetrium

When threatened, the Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar reveals its osmetrium, a forked orange organ that releases a foul smell to deter predators.

Prepupal Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar

As pupation time nears, the Anise Swallowtail Caterpillar spins a silken girdle to help keep it from hanging down.

Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis with Chalcid Wasp

This Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis is being visited by a parasitoid Chalcid Wasp.  Here is a posting from BugGuide that shows a close-up of the Chalcid Wasp.  Butterfly Fun Facts has an excellent description of this Parasitoid, including:  “A healthy chrysalis will have light membranes between its abdominal segments. As wasps grow inside the chrysalis, the membranes turn dark.  Infected chrysalises turn darker and often have a reddish tinge to them.  Remember! When a chrysalis is first infected (eggs laid in the chrysalis) it will appear healthy, have the correct colors and shades, and will move normal. Once the wasp larvae have grown for a few days, the color of the chrysalis will darken.  A chrysalis that has a mature butterfly inside it will also turn dark the day before the butterfly emerges. If a butterfly is inside, you will see the wing pads the day before the butterfly emerges. If it darkens and wing pads cannot be seen, it is a danger sign.”  Unfortunately, a percentage of Swallowtail Chrysalides will never produce an adult if they are preyed upon by parasitoid Chalcid Wasps.

Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis

The Anise Swallowtail Chrysalis darkens just before an adult is ready to emerge.

Anise Swallowtail

This is a gorgeous, adult Anise Swallowtail.

Anise Swallowtail

Ovipositing Anise Swallowtail

And the cycle begins anew as a female Anise Swallowtail deposits her eggs on the host plant.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery eggs
Location: Alton, Illinois, USA
May 28, 2017 1:12 pm
I was wandering around my yard with my tortoise when I discovered a tiny dying leaf with tiny eggs on it. I am totally clueless and need help identifying!
Signature: Sarah D

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Sarah,
We are quite certain these are Stink Bug eggs, and after comparing them to this BugGuide image, we are fairly certain they are Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halymorpha halys, eggs.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an Invasive Exotic Species and according to BugGuide:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere(2); in our area, mostly e US and West Coast states.”  First collected in Pennsylvania in 1998, in just a few years, this noxious species has spread from coast to coast according to BugGuide data.  In addition to doing major agricultural damage, according to BugGuide:  “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures,” the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is a source of consternation to homemakers because they frequently enter homes in large numbers to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible bug larvae?
Location: Caldwell, Idaho
April 6, 2017 6:26 pm
We came across these little ovals on the branches of our little outside blueberry bush. They didn’t move and were difficult to pick off. They appear to be some sort of larvae, but we’re not sure.
Signature: Sara

Katydid Eggs

Dear Sara,
These are the eggs of a Katydid.  Though Katydids eat leaves, in our opinion, they do not do enough damage to be of concern.  Since adult Katydids are among nature’s most audible musicians, we enjoy having these generally green, Grasshopper-like insects in our garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination