Currently viewing the category: "Earwigs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Earwig?
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
December 1, 2011 12:15 pm
I first saw this bug in my bathroom floor and posted it on facebook, noone knew what it was. It measured 1cm in lenght with its tail straight back. This time it kept its tail rolled up and forward like a scorpion even when running wild. It was very fast. Its back legs are bigger. 6 feet total. Last time I had played with it a little and felt its back with a metal pick and it felt hard. I would like to know if it is a dangerous bug or not. I also looked it up here and saw a similar one but the tail is different. The one in your site, also from Puerto Rico is from the west coast of the Island. This one is from the Northeast side. Nearby is a river. I let it go outside, even though a couple people said I should kill it.
Signature: Samuel

Earwig from Puerto Rico

Dear Samuel,
You are correct that this is an Earwig, and it does look like the same species we posted previously from Puerto Rico that Karl identified as
Doru albepes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this?
Location: Eagle Pass, TX
September 12, 2011 1:35 am
I saw it crawling around my living room, at first I thought it was a cricket that escaped from my Gecko’s tank. That was until I turned the lights on.
Signature: Mike C.

Earwig

Dear Mike,
This is an Earwig, an insect that is common in gardens.  We have identified it as a Striped Earwig,
 Labidura riparia, based on this photo posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Preys on various invertebrates, but may occasionally switch to plant material.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Earwigs Everywhere!
Location: Southern California Rural Desert
August 19, 2011 12:37 am
Hello Bugman!
We love your site, and have found it extremely helpful in identifying all the creepy-crawlies we have around our desert home. Anyway quick question for you. We are having an Earwig issue. We find them all over the house it night! In every room, but only at night. Some nights we’ll see two dozen or more! Is there anything we can do to get rid of these guys? Does seeing a lot mean there’s like a nest or colony somewhere? Any info would be greatly appreciated! (P.S. I didn’t have a picture, but they pretty much look like the drawing attached.)
Signature: Earwigged-Out

Earwig from Palmdale

Dear Earwigged-Out,
We have decided to illustrate your inquiry with a photo from our archives of an immature Earwig from Palmdale.  That person just asked for an identification.  They did not ask for advice on the control of Earwigs.  Earwigs are generally associated with the garden, but they are attracted to lights.  We need to do some research on this matter.  We wonder if inhospitable conditions in the desert are causing them to change their habits.  Perhaps they were originally introduced to the area with plantings from a nursery and in an effort to survive in an area that is not suited to their love of moisture, they have fled inside to the comfortable conditions you have created for yourself and your family.  Is this a new development or a long established community?  We expect that Earwigs would be perfectly content to scavenge in your basement for any food that is left available to them, and if conditions are right, that they would reproduce there.  Earwigs are known for some maternal care of the offspring.  Again, we need to do some research.

Hi Bugman,
Thank you for the reply!  Our town is not that far from Palmdale, so the image you used is exactly like the earwigs we are seeing in our home.  Our home, as well as most of the homes in our area, is actually 60+ years old.  But a few years before we moved in, the yard was renovated with some new cacti and other plants, so it is very possible the earwigs came from a nursery.   We definitely feel like since the weather has gotten extremely hot over the last 2 months (110+ degrees daily), we’ve seen a dramatic increase in the number of earwigs in the house.  They are definitely nocturnal — I can’t remember ever seeing one crawling across the floor during the daytime.  We don’t have a basement, and the ironic thing is, our home is made out of steel!  So I’m very surprised they’re getting in, although with the home being so old, I’m sure there’s loads of little spaces here and there.
Do earwigs eat other bugs?  What does their diet primarily consist of?  I’m just wondering if maybe we find a food source and remove that, it would help with our invasion!  We have loads of other spiders, bugs, lizards and birds in our yard (nesting roadrunners even!), and we’d really love the earwigs to stay out there too!
Anyway, thanks again!
Earwigged-Out

Hi again Earwigged-Out,
It is our understanding that Earwigs are omnivorous and that they will eat both plants and animals.  They are frequently found in compost piles.  We did find this interesting bit of information on BugGuide:  “Earwigs are sensitive to heat and dryness, so they usually hide in cool, dark places during the day and come out at night.  Some species hide mostly under leaves, rocks and other debris, while others hide under the bark of trees. An important habitat in the deserts of the southwest US is inside rotting cactus- one of the few places with constant moisture even in the driest parts of the year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help identifying bug, It’s driving us crazy!
Location: Palmdale, California
May 15, 2011 12:50 am
Hello, I see these bugs mostly downstairs in my house. In the kitchen and sometimes the bathrooms. I have also seen them in my den/dining room and crawling on walls and once on the ceiling. I live in the Antelope Valley of California, also known as the High Desert. There are tons of mountains around. The climate right now varies from cold to hot although it is spring. Winters get as cold as 20 degrees, and summers 110.
Signature: Driven crazy

Earwig

Dear Driven crazy,
You have Earwigs.  They will not harm you or your home, but they may eat young seedlings and tender plants in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Household Intruders
Location California
May 9, 2011

Unknown Nymphs

Ed. Note: Reader assistance requested
Our coworker at LACC, Betsy from the Nursing Department, hand delivered these two nymphs taped to a small notepad.  We are uncertain if they are immature Cockroaches, Termites or Earwigs.  Betsy indicated that they were found in large numbers on the kitchen counter and that the new downstairs neighbors have reported a Cockroach infestation which makes Cockroaches our number 1 choice, and they do seem to closely resemble this image of a German Cockroach nymph on BugGuide.  They are very tiny.  If any readers can confirm an identification, it would be greatly appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note: The following email was a followup response to an earlier comment.  This email was accompanied by 14 photos representing at least 6 different species.  While we applaud our new fan’s enthusiasm, we are creating a new posting with edited content.  See the initial posting here.

April 28, 2011
Butte County, CA
… I do have a couple of bugs you might be intrigued by; …  The other was a seemingly voracious black and white striped bug that was encouraged to go forth and eat LOTS of earwigs.
BTW…I got into chickens as earwig control, and now I have more than I know what to do with…LOL…so watch out!  They’re addictive (or at least additive!

Anyway, you’re welcome to my photo collection, should you want it…here are two exemplars and enjoy! 🙂
If there’s anything I can do to help you folks, I have no life, so let me know. 🙂
PA

Hairy Rove Beetle eats Earwig

Hi Pam,
All of your photos are quite wonderful, but we need to maintain a bit of structure here or we would go careening out of control.  Please, don’t put all your eggs (read photos) in one basket (read email) and in the future, please use our identification form which limits the number of photos per submission to three.  We choose the best or most representative one to accompany the posting, and we sometimes use two or all three.  We are positively thrilled to use some of your photos of a Hairy Rove Beetle eating Earwigs.  Several years ago we created a Food Chain section to our site to highlight predators and their prey.  You can see BugGuide for additional information on the fascinating Hairy Rove Beetle.

Hairy Rove Beetle eats Earwig

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination