Currently viewing the category: "Earwigs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Agressive Earwig
Location: greater Adelaide, South Australia
November 4, 2016 6:05 pm
I lifted a pot and this earwig kept attacking my hands. I have a book on insects in greater Adelaide but it only has two species that do not look like this one.
It was very “full”, its inside bulging between the body segments when it turned, and its pincers short and very stiff. Its pinch actually managed to hurt!
Sorry the photo isn’t of very high quality, it was moving fast.
Signature: Gen

Earwig

Earwig

Subject: Friendly Earwig
Location: greater Adelaide, South Australia
November 4, 2016 6:08 pm
I have a book on the insects of greater Adelaide, but it only includes two earwigs.
Initially I thought this may be a brown earwig without wings, perhaps a female with abnormally large pincers, but it has a very defined line on the back of its head.
Signature: Gen

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Gen,
Since we received two Earwig identification requests from you, one labeled “Agressive [sic] Earwig” and the other labeled “Friendly Earwig” and since we believe they represent the same species, we are combining them into one posting.  The Farmstyle website has an image identified only as a Native Earwig and the information that it is:  “native to Australia and is thought to be a predator, not a pest.”  We also found an image of a Native Earwig on PestWeb and the species is identified as
Gonolabis michaelseni.  There are additional images of Gonolabis michaelseni on Friends of Queens Park Bushland

Thankyou for the information! I was confused as I couldn’t find anything on these earwigs despite them being everywhere. I feel a bit silly for not considering they were the same bug but different genders!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A bug I’ve never seen before.
Location: Nebraska
September 23, 2016 6:49 am
Check this out. What is it?
Signature: Josh Jordan

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Josh,
Congratulations on seeing your first Earwig.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on patio and siding
Location: Iowa
June 26, 2016 7:21 am
We are putting some siding up that we got from someone and it has been lying on our patio for some weeks. We have had a lot of rain and today my husband said he saw some of these bugs/insects. I only saw a few of them, but could be hiding and there is water lying on the siding in puddles. Just want to make sure it isn’t something that would harm the home when put on. He is trying to wipe off each piece before he installs.
Signature: Terri Downing

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Terri,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera, and it sound like the siding your stored on your patio that got damp has created the perfect habitat for them.  According to BugGuide:  “Earwigs are sensitive to heat and dryness, so they usually hide in cool, dark places during the day and come out at night.  Some species hide mostly under leaves, rocks and other debris, while others hide under the bark of trees. An important habitat in the deserts of the southwest US is inside rotting cactus- one of the few places with constant moisture even in the driest parts of the year.  Winged species are often attracted to light at night.”  The presence of many Earwigs is more a nuisance than a problem.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown
Location: Columbus ohio
June 7, 2016 2:30 pm
What kind of big is this? A nest is in the dirt under our tree
Signature: Thanks jenny

Male European Earwig

Male European Earwig

Dear Jenny,
We believe your Earwig is a male European Earwig based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: this bug is in my house and yard
Location: Los Angeles, CA
May 15, 2016 10:50 am
hi
I was wondering if you can confirm that this bug is a European Earwig? (and not a termite).
they seem to be prevalant lately inside and around the outside of my house since we moved in a few weeks ago.
I want to make sure it is not a termite. thanks in advance for your help.
Signature: With much thanks and gratitude, Bill Cowan

European Earwig

European Earwig

Dear Bill,
This is an European Earwig, not a Termite, and though they can be a nuisance indoors, they are basically outdoor insects that enjoy the garden, but since they can be attracted to lights, they are frequently found indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Los Angeles
May 6, 2016 8:57 am
Hi there, wondering if you can identify this, and know how to keep them at bay.
Thanks!
Signature: David

Earwig

Earwig

Dear David,
This is an Earwig, a common insect in the garden and they readily enter homes.  We believe your individual is a male European Earwig,
Forficula auricularia, based on images found on BugGuide.  According to Penn State Department of Entomology:  “Earwigs are active at night and hide during the day in cracks and crevices. They are mainly scavengers and occasionally feed on plants. The eggs are laid in burrows in the ground and most species overwinter as adults.”  The site further elaborates:  “Because large numbers may seek shelter in and around homes, the European earwig also has become a notorious household pest in some areas. Although population explosions of this insect are not as intensive as those following its initial introduction into the United States, it is not uncommon to have isolated areas with high populations during periods of warm and humid weather.  When earwigs do invade homes, they can get into everything, including laundry, furniture, loaves of bread, and even clothing and bedding. They hide in cracks and crevices throughout the home and are difficult to keep out, even with the use of screens and other mechanical barriers.”  We do not provide extermination advice, but the Penn State site does provide this management strategy:  “Modification of surrounding areas – Earwigs can be found in large numbers under boards, in tree holes, under decaying bark, or wherever it is moist and dark. The first step to controlling earwigs is to eliminate these and other breeding and nesting places. Homeowners should remove decaying vegetable matter around the home, such as piles of leaves or grass clippings. They should also repair poorly placed rain downspouts and broken irrigation systems, which contribute to moist, dark areas that are attractive to nesting females.”

Ah, brilliant!  That’s definitely it. Thank you so much!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination