Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy Colors!
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
April 23, 2016 1:43 pm
This fella showed up today and I was astounded by it’s nearly day-glow green and blazing red striping. Beautiful to the point of almost appearing fake. Then I started wondering if dragonflies, like so many other animals, go through color changes or become more colorful in mating season…if there is a mating season for dragonflies, that is.
Signature: Thanks!

Swamp Darner, we believe

Swamp Darner, we believe

We believe we have correctly identified your Dragonfly as a Darner, more specifically, a Swamp Darner, Epiaeschna heros, based on this BugGuide image.  The red face is evident in this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, they are found near  “Shaded ponds, streams, swamps, temporary pond” and they are active “February to November in Florida, June to September in northernmost part of range” and that “Females oviposit in a variety of sites, in mud, in stems, or in mud of dried-up ponds.”  Some Dragonflies change color as adults, often with the males getting brighter with age.

How cool! Thank for the knowledge !

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis?
Location: Naples, Florida
April 19, 2016 8:06 am
I’m not sure but I think this might be a molt from a mantis of some kind. Any help would be greatly appreciated. It was clinging to a friend’s lanai screen down here in Naples, Florida.
Signature: S. Ferree

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dear S. Ferree,
Your images are gorgeous.  They are not molts from a mantis, but rather the molt or Exuvia of a Dragonfly.  Dragonfly larvae are known as Naiads, and they are aquatic, so we are guessing there is a pond or stagnant fountain near your friend’s lanai screen.

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

Daniel,
Thank you so much!  That’s really cool.  You’re right about the water.  He lives on a peninsula of a lake.  He and his wife will be relieved that it wasn’t anything to be scared of.  They had a second one show up yesterday.
Thanks again
S. Ferree

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me identify please
Location: Southeast Georgia
April 11, 2016 3:01 pm
Seen today on my poplar tree in southeast Georgia. Thank you!
Pest or helper?
Signature: Thanks! Birgit Atwood

Saddlebags Dragonfly

Saddlebags Dragonflies

Dear Birgit,
We are seeing double.  These are a Saddlebags in the genus
Tramea, and in the suborder Anisoptera, the Dragonflies.  Dragonflies eat large quantities of flying insects, including Mosquitoes, so we place them solidly in the “helper” category.  Five of the seven known species of Saddlebags are pictured on BugGuide.

Thank you so much! I shooed them away yesterday thinking they were eating my new buds! No more!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Needham’s Skimmer or Golden-Winged Skimmer?
Location: Jupiter, Florida
April 5, 2016 11:09 am
Greetings from Palm Beach County, Florida. This female dragonfly stopped to watch my volunteers remove trash from Pine Glades Natural Area in Jupiter, Florida. Since she didn’t seem to mind the group of people picking up beer bottles and plastic bags from around her perch, I snapped a few photos. Once I downloaded the pictures I was amazed by the beauty of this insect! In trying to nail down a name for this bug, I found two possible choices: Needham’s Skimmer or Golden-Winged Skimmer. I’m hoping you can tell me which one she is. As always, your web site is outstanding – I use it just about every day.
Signature: Ann Mathews – Palm Beach County Environmental Resources Management

Female Skimmer

Female Skimmer

Hi Ann,
Thanks so much for the compliment.  Your image is positively gorgeous, but we often have difficulty with Dragonfly identifications, especially female Dragonflies.  The Needham’s Skimmer,
Libellula needhami, pictured on BugGuide looks like a good match, and the Golden Winged Skimmer, Libellula auripennis, pictured on BugGuide also looks close.  Perhaps one of our readers with more experience identifying Dragonflies will be able to provide a conclusive ID with justification.  According to BugGuide, the Golden Winged Skimmer is “Very similar, if not indistinguishable in the field, from Needham’s Skimmer. The latter is restricted to the coastal southeastern United States. ”  Of Needhams’s Skimmer, BugGuide remarks:  “Males are best separated from male Golden-Wings by redder face and body, along with brown lower hindlegs and less orange wings. Female and juvenile male Needham’s best separated from Golden-Wings by lateral thoracic pattern, augmented by the two-toned costa.”

Thanks for posting my picture of the Needham’s or Golden Winged skimmer. I hope someone can nail down her identity. Then again, she might like to remain mysterious and keep some secrets to herself! As always, kudos to the team at What’s That Bug for bringing the fascinating world of bugs to people all over the world.
Ann Mathews

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly
Location: Arenal Volcano National Park, Costa Rica
January 21, 2016 7:56 am
Hi there
Please can you tell me what dragonfly this is. It was at Arenal Volcano National Park near Lago Los Patos.
Thanks
Signature: Steph

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

Dear Steph,
Thanks for sending a higher resolution image.  The more detail in the image, the easier it is to make an ID.  We searched the database of Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata) of Costa Rica and the closest match we could locate there is
Erythrodiplax berenice.  We crosschecked that on The Dragonflies and Damselflies of New Jersey, where we learned it is called a Seaside Dragonlet, and on BugGuide, and though we see a similarity, we do not believe the species is correct.  We are posting your image and we hope one of our readers will write in with a more conclusive identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Damselfly
Location: Mexico
January 11, 2016 3:08 pm
Damselflies mating on a man-made pond at the Botanical Gardens in Puerto Valalrta, Mexico. Blue in colour…so I’m guessing a Enallagma sp??
Signature: Graeme Davis

Mating Damselflies

Mating Damselflies

Hi Graeme,
We agree that these are most likely Bluets in the genus
Enallagma, a genus well documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination