Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this alien creature?
Location: North Texas
March 29, 2011 10:54 pm
We, recently, bought a house with a pool and when we drained the pool, to clean it out, I noticed these creatures moving around in the shallow water (about 3 inches deep). There were about 5 of these creatures and I caught two of them to take pictures and ask around to see if anyone knew what they are, but nobody, that I asked, knew what they were.
I observed these creatures for awhile and noticed that they have 6 legs and they squirt water out their back ends to propell themselves through the water.
I took these pictures. If you know what they are, can you tell me what they are?
Signature: Scotti B.

Dragonfly Naiad

Hi Scotti,
This is the larva of a Dragonfly, and like many other aquatic nymphs, it is called a Naiad.  We hope they survived the pool cleaning.  You can transfer them to another container of water until they mature, or even better, release them in a local pond.

Thank you for finding out what kind of alien looking creature I found in my pool was. It turned out to be a Dragonfly Larva (Naiad). I had never seen one before and it had me stumped. And, by the way, they did survive the pool cleaning. I saved them all and I released them into a nearby pond and I hope to see them flying around this summer.
Thanks, again!
Scotti B.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly hunter
Location: Sydney Australia
March 9, 2011 11:57 pm
Dear bugman,can you please identify this
fearsome looking dragenfly hunter ,I found in my garden this morning?
King Regards
Signature: Katja

Robber Fly eats Dragonfly

Hi Katja,
The Robber Fly in your photo looks like an especially large specimen, and large Robber Flies are capable of snatching large flying prey on the wing.  They are formidable hunters.  We believe we have properly identified your Robber Fly as the Common Yellow Robber Fly,
Ommatius sp., by comparing your photos to those posted on the Insects of Brisbane website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly Species??
Location: Buxton, Maine USA
January 24, 2011 1:17 pm
I found this dragonfly in my mother’s garden in Buxton, Maine USA. I looked through all the dragonfly posts you had on this site but could not find one that looked just like it. Can you identify the species? Thank you!
Signature: Cheryl Mitchell

Darner

Hi Cheryl,
It seems whenever we attempt to identify a Dragonfly, someone writes in to correct us.  For some reason, Dragonflies are a real identification challenge for us.  We believe this is a Darner in the family Aeshnidae.  See BugGuide for the species possibilities.

Darner

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonhunter Exuvia?
Location: Rangeley Lake, Rangeley, Maine USA
January 24, 2011 8:19 am
I found this exuvia on a dock at Rangeley Lake in Rangeley Maine USA. Does it belong to the Dragonhunter Dragonfly nymph? I look forward to solving this mystery. My husband was holding it in the palm of his hand when I took the picture. It was about two inches long. Can you tell us what kind of bug it is? Thank you.  Thank you!
Signature: Cheryl Mitchell

Dragonhunter Exuvia

Hi Cheryl,
Apparently you emailed your photos to at least one friend who submitted an identification request a day earlier and signed the request “Not sure”, beating you to both a response and a posting to our site. Since you submitted two images, and “Not sure” only submitted one photo, we can create a new posting and include your second image which provides a nice sense of scale.  We gave a slightly snotty response during our response to “Not sure” due to the lack of relevant information that was provided.  You are correct that this is a Dragonhunter exuvia.  We did not realize that this was the exuvia, a name given to the cast off exoskeleton that remains when an insect molts during metamorphosis.  Thank you for providing that clarification.

Thank you very much for your prompt response. Yes, please create a new posting to include both of the images I submitted of the Dragonhunter exuvia.
Sincerely,
Cheryl Mitchell

Ed. Note:  August 10, 2014:  This is a ventral view, and it can be compared to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is it?
Location: Maine
January 23, 2011 7:13 pm
A friend took this photo and we can not identify it…can you help?
Signature: Not sure

Dragonhunter

Dear Not sure,
Luckily for us, there was a field on our submission form for a location, or we might have gotten no useful information from your email.  Did your friend find this creature in the kitchen? or during one of the snowstorms that is currently blanketing much of the northeast? or as we suspect, in a lake last summer?  This is a Dragonhunter Naiad, the larva of a Dragonfly.  You may compare your image to this posting of a photo of a larval Dragonhunter,
Hagenius brevistylus, on BugGuide.  The Dragonhunter has one of the most distinctive looking Naiads, the name given to all aquatic larvae, of all the North American Dragonflies.  According to the Insects of West Virginia website:  “Dragonhunters often capture dragonflies nearly their own size” which explains the common name Dragonhunter.  According to a University of Michigan web page:  “Hagenius brevistylus is most certainly Michigan’s most distinctively shaped odonate larva (Fig. 1). The very flat abdomen is broad, nearly circular in outline, bearing dark mid-dorsal hooks and sharp lateral angles on abdominal segments 2-9. This shape is shared by other gomphid genera in other parts of the world and appears related to the habit of burrowing in leafy trash.”  Over time, the appearance of the larvae may have evolved to mimic dead leaves like elm tree leaves ensuring that predators might overlook the tasty larvae, which then contributes to the survival of the species.

Ed. Note:  August 10, 2014:  This is a ventral view, and it can be compared to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

a flying bug of some kind
Location: tacoma, washington, USA
January 21, 2011 6:06 pm
hi bugman, i have a photo of a bug that i have tentatively identified as Plathemis lydia or possibly Libellula pulchella but i’m not sure. i see a lot of blue-eyed darners around, but this is a new one that i’ve not seen before.
Signature: przxqgl

Twelve Spot Skimmer

Dear przxqgl,
We agree with your first choice,
Plathemis lydia, the Common Whitetail.  According to BugGuide:  “Males and females have different wing patterns.  Immature males have the same body pattern as females but the same wing pattern as mature males.  ‘tween’ males have abdomens that are beginning to turn blue, but the adolescent body pattern still shows through the blue.  Mature males have a short, stout abdomen that is completely chalky blue-white covering the adolescent pattern.  Females have a short, stout abdomen with several oblique dorsolateral white or pale yellow markings against a brown ground color; each wing has three black evenly-spaced blotches.”  Because of the pictures and descriptions on BugGuide, we would say you have photographed an immature male Common Whitetail.

Correction from a Comment
This is a mature male Libellula pulchella. Twelve-spotted skimmer. 3 dark spots with 2 white patches between is a positive id.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination