Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Huff Lake, Bonner County, Idaho, USA
Date: 09/07/2019
Time: 01:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dragonfly cruising marsh shore of Huff Lake in north Idaho. Apparently mating. Can you identify it from the images?
How you want your letter signed:  Sailortom

Mosaic Darners in mating position

Dear Sailortom,
We believe these are Mosaic Darners in the genus
Aeshna which is represented on BugGuide.  Several similar looking species are found in Idaho, and we do not feel confident providing a species identification.  Though you indicate they were “cruising marsh shore” they do not appear alive in your images.

Mosaic Darner

Thank’s. I am happy with the generic ID. The images are of living Darners. They perched on a dock long enough for pictures. Then they linked up, I assume to mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs rescued from pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Huntsville, AL
Date: 08/21/2019
Time: 02:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found several of these swimming around in our pool.  They are obviously water bugs if some variety, but my guess is they are immature, making them harder to identify.  Any clues to what they might grow up to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Brown family

Dragonfly Naiads

Dear Brown family,
These are Dragonfly Naiads, the aquatic larval stage.  If they are allowed to grow in your pool, you will have adult flying Dragonflies after their final metamorphosis.

Dragonfly Naiad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Stormville NY
Date: 06/22/2019
Time: 03:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I found this bug on my sidewalk it had four legs and each of the legs has black squares hanging off each leg. It could fly. It’s body was white but the wings were black. I have never seen an insect such as this one and was really curious as to what it could possibly be.
How you want your letter signed”  Simran Kumar

Common Whitetail

Dear Simran,
Despite the blurriness of your image, the distinctive markings of the male Common Whitetail Dragonfly are unmistakable.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison. What you have mistaken for four legs are actually four wings.  The legs of the Dragonflies are useless for walking.  The Dragonfly uses its legs to perch, to land, to catch food by creating a basket and to hold onto its mate.  The Dragonfly is capable of amazing feats while flying.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Water bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Arkansas
Date: 05/25/2019
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was out cleaning the pool because it hasn’t been cleaned since we moved in and I saw some weird looking bugs. I’ve never seen anything like them and I tried googling it but nothing showed up so you’re my last hope. I’m also very sorry that the pictures aren’t well lit but it’s all I have.
How you want your letter signed:  Chloe

Dragonfly Naiads

Dear Chloe,
These are the aquatic larvae of Dragonflies, commonly called naiads.  They are aquatic predators that will help to naturally control populations of Mosquitoes. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Hanoi, Vietnam
Date: 05/09/2019
Your letter to the bugman:  I have just sent an ID request for an Italian dragonfly, and then recalled that I had still not been able to put a name to one I found in VN.  I could not get any info from people I knew there and couldn’t track it in the web either.
I would be very grateful if you could put me out of my misery. :-))
Regards
How you want your letter signed:  Fof

Dragonfly:  possibly Common Picturewing

Dear Fof,
We located a Dragonflies and Damselflies of Vietnam site, but we are currently out of the office, battling a very slow internet in Ohio, and we are frustrated with the organizational structure of the site, but you might be able to locate your individual by carefully scrutinizing the site.  We also located the Stamp Mall site where there is a beautiful set of 1977 Dragonfly stamps from Vietnam, and the seventh stamp appears similar to your individual, but we cannot read Vietnamese.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we agree this looks very similar to Rhyothemis variegata imperatrix.  According to iNaturalist, the species is known as the Common Picturewing.  Island.f3 has some images from Okinawa.  Odonata.jp also has some very good images.  Online images indicate this is a highly variable species that has varying degrees of transparency in the markings on its wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  WtFtB.?.?.!
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Glassell Park, Ca.
Date:  May 3, 2019
Time:  8:40am
Your letter to the bugman:  Howdy man of bugs, I need help identifying this underwater creature. I found it under in my fountain resting on algae as I was tending to my pot in the garden. I carefully removed it from the water and placed in a dry surface to try and take photos. Out of water it remained calm. I put it back in it’s place after taking photos.
Please help BugMan!
How you want your letter signed:  Underwater bug finder

Dragonfly Larva

Dear Underwater bug finder,
This is the larva of a Dragonfly.  It is an aquatic predator that will feed on insects and other creatures in your fountain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination