Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly
Location: Northwest PA
June 17, 2017 11:05 am
I want to call this a Common Green Darner but just doesn’t seem right.
Signature: Glenn

Springtime Darner

Hi Glenn,
While this is a Darner, it is not a Green Darner.  We believe this is a Mosaic Darner in the genus
Aeshna based on BugGuide images, but alas, we do not have the confidence to provide a species identification.  Perhaps one of our readers who is more skilled at Dragonfly identifications will write in with a comment to identify the species.

Correction:  June 22, 2017
After posting, we received a comment from Richard indicating this is a Springtime Darner.  Here is a similar BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have brown thorax with two relatively straight yellow lateral thoracic stripes. Eyes generally blue. Abdomen spotted with blue. Female similar but abdominal spots may be blue or green.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it a dragonfly
Location: North Carolina
June 1, 2017 8:05 pm
See picture of bug found in my backyard.
Signature: No

Common Whitetail

Dear No,
We have identified this Dragonfly as a male Common Whitetail thanks to this BugGuide image.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site later in the month while our editorial staff is on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Request
Location:  Arusha Tanzania
February 1, 2017
Hello Daniel,
Apologies for not replying earlier, I have been away travelling with no access to internet and so this was a wonderful surprise to find on my return!
Thank-you very much for identifying these insects. There were many others of interest during my time in East Africa, and I only wish I had my camera with me more often. However, it has served to develop my interest and so I am more observant these days with what I find around me wherever I am in the world. And knowing the correct species ameks a world of difference to conducting further research and learning more about these fascinating creatures.
I have been enjoying browsing your website and think you offer a fantastic service, so I hope you enjoy the identification process too as you help people like me.
Did you manage to identify the last individual (attached)? It too was quite spectacular! (seen in Arusha, Tanzania late 2008)
Kind regards,
Tom

Darner

Dear Tom,
We believe your Dragonfly is a Darner in the family Aeshnidae, but we did not find any visual matches on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly is help
Location: Denver, CO
September 10, 2016 10:39 am
This was on my raspberry bush in Dwnver this morning. Do you know what type of dragonfly it is?
Signature: Thank you,

Black Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

We believe, based on this BugGuide image, that your Dragonfly is a Black Saddlebags, Tramea lacerata.  According to BugGuide:  “Large dark ‘saddlebags’ on hindwings distinctive. Could be confused with Carolina or Red Saddlebags in poor light. Flies constantly, often gliding, perches infrequently.”  We suspect it is significant that your image was taken in the morning, before this Dragonfly warmed up and began flying.  You most likely captured the image after its nightly rest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming bug?
Location: Tennessee
August 27, 2016 7:45 am
I live in Chattanooga TN, I noticed 4 or 5 of these in the kiddie pool in the backyard. The pool is a blow up pool, and has not been cleaned out for a very long time. I usually see these in the late morning, around 10, and they are very fast swimmers. I caught one and put it on the pavement to take a picture. It has 6 legs, and is kind of a clearish yellow. Its about 3/4 of an inch long. Any ideas what it could be? Thanks for any help:)
Signature: Holly Hickam

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Holly,
This is the larva or Naiad of a Dragonfly.  As you probably realize, standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes.  Dragonfly larvae will eat any mosquito larvae that develop in standing water, so they are a beneficial insect.  Adult Dragonflies also feed on winged adult mosquitoes.  We hope you are able to relocate the larvae in your stagnant pool into a suitable area pond.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pool bug
Location: perth, Australia (Ed. Note:  We needed clarification on the location.)
August 19, 2016 3:57 am
I found heaps of these bugs walking amongst the leaves in the bottom of my pool. They were alive and well and did not seem to be phased being in or out of the water
Signature: djr

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear djr,
This is the aquatic larval form of a Dragonfly, known as a naiad.  Is your location Perth in Australia or Canada?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination