Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Hungary
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 10:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am giving a talk on Monday and would like to include the attached photographs but have been unable to identify the species as I have found most of the websites unhelpful.
You have been very helpful in the past and I would much appreciate your assistance.
How you want your letter signed:  William Smiton

Mating Dragonflies

Dear William,
Are you from Hungary or did you take these gorgeous images while on holiday?  Do you speak Hungarian?  Which sites did you not find helpful?  We did a web search for the order Odonata and Hungary and quickly found szitakotok, a site dedicated to Hungarian Dragonflies.  The site is difficult to navigate, and it loads slowly, but it seems quite comprehensive.  Did you check that site?

Dragonfly

Your third image reminds us of the North American Common Whitetail, so we decided to see if there were any members on szitakotok from the genus Plathemis, but there are not.  Perhaps one of our readers who is adept at Dragonfly identification will provide input.  Perhaps if you have not yet checked szitakotok, you will have luck self-identifying.  Please let us know if you determine any identities.

Dragonfly

I’m from Northern Ireland and took the photos on a birdwatching trip. I’ve tried various websites including the one you recommend but it doesn’t identify the dragonflies in the photographs. Daniel has been very helpful in the past so hope to hear from him.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  mystery Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwestern Ontario, Canada
Date: 12/10/2018
Time: 08:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Trying to get ID for this dragonfly
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Alison

Mosaic Darner

Dear Alison,
How unusual to see this magnificent Dragonfly and blossoms so late in the season in Ontario.  We can’t provide you with an exact species, but we believe this is one of the Mosaic Darners in the genus
Aeshna which is pictured on BugGuide.  Many species in the genus are quite similar looking.

Thank you!  I’m sorry that maybe I didn’t say that the photo was taken on Sept 12 ’18 .
AG
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A great shot of Ditch Jewel Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ranip, Ahmedabad City, Gujarat, India
Date: 10/17/2018
Time: 02:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi , great to notice a wonderful site like this. I have taken this wonderful snap of probable ” Ditch Jewel Dragonfly” at my home garden. I want you to confirm its species indetity. You can freely use it on your website.
How you want your letter signed:  SHDNEURO

Dragonfly

Dear SHDNEURO,
We agree that this is a beautiful image of a Dragonfly, and based on images posted to Odonata of India, it might be a female Ditch Jewel,
Brachythemis contaminata.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Mississauga, Ont. Canada
Date: 09/11/2018
Time: 04:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just found out about your website this week……this photo was taken back in 2015 in my backyard……nobody I know has ever seen one before…..
How you want your letter signed:  GB

Green Darner

Dear GB,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, your Dragonfly is a Green Darner.  According to BugGuide:  “Thorax unmarked bright green in both sexes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Guapiles, Costa Rica
Date: 07/29/2018
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Please help me to identify this 2 dragonflies.
How you want your letter signed:  Johannes

Damselfly

Dear Johannes,
These are not Dragonflies, but they are Damselflies from the suborder Zygoptera, and Dragonflies are in a different suborder but within the same order Odonata.  The Damselfly with the red markings looks like a 
Hetaerina sp. pictured on Costa Rican Dragonflies and Damselflies. and it looks like a Occisa Rubyspot from Belize we have in our archives. We are uncertain about your other individual.

Damselfly

Damselfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Gold Canyon, Arizona
Date: 07/25/2018
Time: 09:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this damaged and dead dragonfly in my back yard this morning.  I’m having a difficult time identifying it.  Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Lucy Lancaster

Female Mexican Amberwing, we believe

Dear Lucy,
Many Dragonflies exhibit pronounced sexual dimorphism, meaning males and females often look like entirely different species, and since male Dragonflies often are more colorful, they are most often found illustrating the species.  That said, we believe we have identified this mutilated corpse as a female Mexican Amberwing,
Perithemis intensa, thanks to images included on the Arizona Dragonflies site, but we would not rule out that it might be a female Eastern Amberwing, Perithemistenera, which is also pictured on Arizona Dragonflies.  Thanks for including the ruler for scale.  Of the Mexican Amberwing, BugGuide notes:  “Small, thorax and abdomen yellowish-brown and unmarked. Wing markings rather variable.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination