Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: big dragonfly
Location: sacramento
August 22, 2017 7:15 am
can you tell me what dragonfly is this
Signature: barb

Saddlebags Dragonfly

Dear Barb,
This is one of the Saddlebags Dragonflies in the genus
Tramea, and based on its color and its resemblance to this BugGuide image, we believe it is a Black Saddlebags.  According to BugGuide:  “Seldom perches.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thanks Daniel!  I do a type of hand embroidery called Stumpwork and bugs are one of the things that I like to make.  And as an added challenge, I like to do ones that I find when we travel.
Celeste

How wonderful.  Please send us some images if you can.

Embroidered Beautiful Demoiselle

Here’s one of my favorites…my version of a Beautiful Demoiselle (Calopteryx virgo).

Thanks Celeste.  Your embroider is beautiful.  We are categorizing this in our Bug Art category.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Dragonfly Identification
Location: Central Florida
August 13, 2017 5:27 pm
Hello,
I spotted this dragonfly in my front yard earlier today. Can you help me identify what species it is please?
Signature: Julie

Scarlet Skimmer we believe

Dear Julie,
We would gladly defer to anyone with more experience in identifying Dragonflies, but in our opinion, this appears to be a Scarlet Skimmer,
Crocothemis servilia, which we found on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Native from southern Japan and China to northern Australia. Introduced accidentally to south Florida and to Oahu, Hawai’i” and “Amber patch at the base of each hindwing; black stripe along the dorsal edge of the abdomen.” Alas, the angle of your photographic image is not ideal for verifying the diagnostic features.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Male Flame Skimmer comes to stagnant fountain
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 12, 2017 11:07 am
This morning, our editorial staff ventured outside after posting many of our readers identification requests, and we immediately spotted this male Flame Skimmer.  We had seen a male in late June and then in early July we got some images of a female Flame Skimmer ovipositing in the stagnant fountain.  There are never any Mosquito larvae in the stagnant fountain, and the raccoons are always dragging out the algae, probably hunting for naiads.

Male Flame Skimmer

Male Flame Skimmer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tule Bluet with side of flies
Location: Hardwick, New Jersey
August 4, 2017 11:42 am
Thought you might enjoy these photos of a Tule Bluet dining on some sort of fly (I think). Not sure if there is enough of the fly visible in this shot to identify it. The bluet is about 1.5 inches long, which gives you a context for the size of the fly.
Happy bugging!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Tule Bluet eats Fly

Dear Deborah,
As always, your images of this feasting Damselfly are gorgeous and an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  We believe, because of the long legs, that the prey is either a Crane Fly in the infraorder Tipulomorpha or a Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae.  The Long Legged Flies, according to BugGuide, are found in “Lightly shaded areas near swamps and streams, in meadows and woodlands” so their habitat is about the same as the Tule Bluet which is pictured on BugGuide.

Tule Bluet eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found by the side of a Canadian Lake
Location: Lake Eduard, Quebec
July 31, 2017 2:23 pm
Hi
If you’ve got time my 4 year old son Leo would love to know what this bug is.
It is about 3cm long and he found it on the rocks by the side of the lake shore.
Signature: Leo Taylor

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Leo,
This is a Dragonhunter naiad, the aquatic nymph of the dragonfly species
Hagenius brevistylus. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination