Currently viewing the category: "Dobsonflies and Fishflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird butterfly creature
Geographic location of the bug:  Kingston Ontario Canada
Date: 02/08/2018
Time: 05:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This weird bug was hanging around my dock in June. It had a very long body, and was pretty clumsy when it flew. It looked as though its body was to heavy to support it. It hung out in the cedars for a long time and then disappeared. I have tried to figure out what it is through google, a bug book and friends and no one has a clue! Hoping you can help!
How you want your letter signed:  Martha

Dark Fishfly

Dear Martha,
This is not a butterfly.  It is a Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia which is pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tampa, Florida
Date: 01/23/2018
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on the outside wall of my garage. Snapped this photo with my phone.  Very interested in finding out what it is!  Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Selcuk Mumcu

Hey – we found it.  It was a FISHFLY….

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Selcuk,
You are correct.  We believe this is a male Spring Fishfly, which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Underwater centipede??
Geographic location of the bug:  Alta, CA
Date: 12/08/2017
Time: 12:29 AM EDT
So, our house wraps around the remnants of a historic gold mine with access to the mine from a back door. There is a fresh water spring that flows from miles back, with several small, dammed pools about a quarter mile in. Today while spelunking, we crossed the path of a peculiar centipede looking insect below the water in a pool about 8 to 10 inches deep! He had a sort of swim/crawl movement and I’d say about 3 inches long and a half inch thick. Wondering if he’s a native ethereal dweller or some sort of astral crosser come to us from The Upsidedown.
How you want your letter signed:  the good people of InnerEarth

Aquatic Larva, probably Dobsonfly

Dear good people of InnerEarth,
This is an aquatic larva of a flying insect, and we are relatively certain it is a member of the family Corydalidae, which includes Dobsonflies and Fishflies.  The similar looking larva of the Eastern Dobsonfly is known as a Hellgrammite.  Here is a BugGuide image of a Fishfly larva.  Your larva might be that of a California Dobsonfly,
Neohermes californicus

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walking through memory lane
Geographic location of the bug:  Colombia, South America.
Date: 11/19/2017
Time: 06:22 PM EDT
Hey! So I was just erasing some pictures on my phone and I came across this giant flying scary bug I once encountered and took a picture of. Maybe a Corydalinae? However, I just can’t seem to get the species right. It was like 3 inches long, as far as I remember. Could you give me a hand?
How you want your letter signed:  So close yet so far, Daniel.

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Daniel,
This is a female Dobsonfly and you are correct that she is in the subfamily Corydalinae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Winged bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Woodbury CT
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 09:32 PM EDT
Can you please tell us what this bug is? It was out at night by our front porch light.
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Fishfly

Dear Nancy,
This is a Fishfly, and considering the season, we speculate it is a Summer Fishfly,
Chauliodes pectinicornis. According to BugGuide:  “Antennae pectinate in both sexes”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird bug with backwards head
Geographic location of the bug :  McKinney Texas
August 26, 2017 9:22 AM
I have no clue what this is
It gave me chills it looks like scifi related
How you want your letter signed:  None

Male Dobsonfly

Dear None,
This is a male Dobsonfly, and we suspect this is a threat position used to intimidate predators.  Those scimitar shaped mandibles look fierce, but they are actually quite useless when it comes to biting humans, so they are harmless.  The mandibles are used by males to impress females and to thwart other males who might be competing for females.  Female Dobsonflies have less impressive looking but more formidable mandibles.

Male Dobsonfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination