Currently viewing the category: "Dobsonflies and Fishflies"
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Subject: Fascinating large insect
Location: Warwick, NY USA
June 27, 2017 5:52 pm
I’ve been trying to ID this insect since I first saw it 3 years ago. I see them from time to time in my backyard (usually near pool). I live in Warwick, NY.
It’s a very unusual bug, very similar to both wasp and stonefly. It’s large, about 3 cm in length and to my surprise has huge wings which are not visible when folded. It’s head looks scary with large mandibles and very short antennae. Today I found a dead one in my garage with it’s wings fully spread. Everyone who I showed it to, had instant panic like reaction 🙂
I’m hoping you can help me to ID this insect.
Signature: Len

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Len,
This is a female Dobsonfly, and though they are not aggressive towards humans, they can defend themselves with those powerful mandibles.  Interestingly, male Dobsonflies have incredibly developed mandibles, but they are incapable of biting with them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Northern Tennessee
June 26, 2017 6:00 am
Hello!
I found this bug on top of a trash can in Northern Tennessee during the summertime. If you could identify it for me, that would be great. It’s so obscure looking, and I can’t a picture of a bug that looks like it. Thanks!
Signature: Thea

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Thea,
Because of their large size and spectacular appearance, the male Dobsonfly is one of our most common summer identification requests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a moth?
Location: Hunt Texas – Bear Creek Scout Camo
June 24, 2017 11:40 am
Friends son went to boy scout camp and got a pic of the bug attached. I think it is a moth but not sure
Signature: Steve

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Steve,
The mouthparts of a moth form a coiled, tubelike proboscis, unlike this impressive, harmless, male Dobsonfly that has saber-shaped mandibles.  We just found this impressive site, Seabrooke Leckie, with gorgeous mating Dobsonfly images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This thing looks like it flew out of Satan’s Butt
Location: Farmington MN USA
June 9, 2017 2:24 pm
Hello!
Thank you for taking the time to identify this insect for me! We saw it this one time as depicted in the photo in Farmington MN(Southern suburb)on June 12th of last year, and haven’t seen it since.
As you can tell by my description, I find it hella ugly, and hope I never see it again.
Signature: Matthew

Spring Fishfly

Dear Matthew,
If you were creeped out by this harmless male Spring Fishfly, we wonder how tou will react upon encountering its larger and also harmless relative, the male Eastern Dobsonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: CReaPY
Location: Northern Indiana
May 27, 2017 4:25 pm
Just wondering if its a good bug or bad bug
Signature: IDK

Spring Fishfly

Dear IDK,
Good and Bad are such relative terms when it comes to insects.  This is a male Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, and it is not a threat in any way to humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults typically fly late spring: March?-May (North Carolina), April-May (West Virginia). Seen into June and even early July in New England (see Massachusetts records). Further south (Florida), this species is seen much of year.”  The genus is mentioned on TroutNut, which means anglers will use adult and larval Fishflies for bait.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a moth or bee
Location: New Jersey
May 2, 2017 2:09 am
This insect was on my screen door. He never left the whole day. We actually thought it was dead but it left later in the day. On the underside his body was long and thin. Can you identify?
Signature: Me Ma

Spring Fishfly

Dear Me Ma,
This is neither a moth nor a bee.  It is a female Spring Fishfly.

Thanks for your response. It’s the first one we’ve seen in our area.  It’s actually still on our screen door.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination