Currently viewing the category: "Crustaceans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looks like a lobster but really small
Geographic location of the bug:  Chicago, Il
Date: 06/13/2018
Time: 09:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any help would be appreciated
How you want your letter signed:  Thank You

Crayfish

This is a freshwater Crustacean known as a Crayfish, and they are classified in the same taxonomic sub-phylum as Crabs and Lobsters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge bug in pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Tulsa, Oklahoma
Date: 06/03/2018
Time: 04:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, we found this creature dead in our pool. It looks to have 8 legs, antennae, and two pincers in the back. It is about 3 inches long and it has a hard shell
How you want your letter signed:  Drew

Crayfish

Dear Drew,
This is a Crayfish, a freshwater crustacean.  You did not clarify if your pool is below ground or above ground, or if it is a swimming pool or a garden pool.  We understand how this Crayfish might have fallen into a below ground pool, but if you have an above ground pool, we suspect a person or creature (a predator like a raccoon perhaps) is responsible for it being where you found it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A strange find in my back yard
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach Virginia
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 05:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bugman:
I found this in my backyard.  We live up against a wooded area called stumpy lake.  I don’t know if it is a crayfish or a scorpion?  I think i would have to rule out scorpion.  It did not seem to be real fast or super aggressive.  I took several pictures so that you could identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Macon Hardy

Crayfish

Dear Macon,
This is a Crayfish, a semiaquatic crustacean that is often found in slow running streams and ponds.  They can survive out of water and in times of drought, they will burrow underground.

Crayfish

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found bug claw in clean laundry
Geographic location of the bug:  North Florida
Date: 04/01/2018
Time: 06:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found a brown 1″ long pincer claw hanging onto a sock in my laundry. Any help figuring out what bug it could have belonged to is appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Grace

Crayfish Claw

Dear Grace,
This looks to us like the claw of a Crayfish, a small, freshwater Crustacean that resembles a lobster.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Very large cicada-like, wingless insect found (dead)
Geographic location of the bug:  New Bern, North Carolina
Date: 02/18/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this nearly 3 inch (dead) insect on our golf course in New Bern, NC. It seems to be cicada-type, but much larger, with a bright blue “saddle” dorsal pattern in thorax area. Several legs were gone, but the remaining ones seemed to belong to an original six, and have beetle characteristics.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Pellegrini

Crayfish

Dear Cindy,
Commonly called a Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad or Clawfish, this is actually a freshwater Crustacean, not an insect.  When not missing its legs, a Crayfish looks like a small lobster.

Thank you, so much, Daniel!  No wonder I couldn’t find it on the insect charts!  I suppose a gull must have dropped it.  We are near creeks and the Neuse River, but not near enough for a crayfish to crawl.
My friends are awaiting your answer.  Thank you, again!
Cindy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Juneau, ak
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 06:09 AM EDT
Found this in my bathroom. Can u tell me what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Albert Dick

Woodlouse

Dear Albert,
We always love getting submissions from Alaska.  This is a Woodlouse or Sowbug, a terrestrial Isopod in the suborder Oniscidea.  According to BugGuide, they are found:  “wherever cool, dark, moist places are available to shelter woodlice from dryness and heat during the day” and they feed upon “Plant material, usually dead. If live plants are soft and moist enough on the outside, they will eat them and sometimes do damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination