Currently viewing the category: "Cockroaches"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nymph German Roach?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bathroom
Date: 03/23/2018
Time: 11:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this in the bathroom on several occasions randomly.
Looks like a baby roach to me.
How you want your letter signed:  alex

Brown Banded Cockroach Nymph

Dear Alex,
This is definitely an immature Cockroach, but based on this BugGuide image, we are not convinced it is a German Cockroach nymph.  Based on images posted to Featured Creatures, we believe it is an immature Brown Banded Cockroach,
Supella longipalpa.  That site states:  “Domestic cockroaches such as the German cockroach and brown-banded cockroach are closely associated with humans and have the potential to adversely affect human health. According to Kramer and Brenner (2009), cockroaches are recognized as one of the most important sources of allergens, with about half of asthmatics allergic to cockroaches. Allergens from cockroaches include cast skins and excrement. Some symptoms of cockroach-induced allergies include sneezing, skin reactions, and eye irritation (Wirtz 1980).”  As an aside, we consider the “Geographic location of the bug” to mean a city, state, or country, not a room in a house like a bathroom, which does not in any way clarify where the sighting occurred.  Many insects have limited geographic ranges, and knowing exactly where the sighting occurred is often a great assistance in making an identification. 

Thank you.
And location is Southeastern PA.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  brown  bug with yellow stripes and blue legs
Geographic location of the bug:  150km north east of Esperance Western Australia
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 06:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bug while at work. Looks a big like a cockroach.
How you want your letter signed:  GT

Mitchell’s Diurnal Cockroach

Dear GT,
Quite some time ago, we first identified this colorful Cockroach,
Polyzosteria mitchelli, as a Mardis Gras Cockroach, a name we found on Esperance Fauna where it is described as:  “most striking with its brilliant color combination. It is mainly recorded from the semi-arid areas of WA, SA and NSW, where always a delight to encounter.”   Getty Images uses the common name Mitchell’s Diurnal Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this garden bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Israel
Date: 03/14/2018
Time: 08:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this walking around the garden. Can you help me identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Ms

Egyptian Desert Roach

Dear Ms,
This sure looks to us like a female Egyptian Desert Roach,
Polyphaga aegyptiaca, a species that will NOT infest your home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Date: 02/12/2018
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I’ve been seeing those bugs around my bedroom for a few months, but haven’t yet managed to identify them through internet swatches searches.
The best I could do regarding taking a photo is the one attached (+ zoomed in / enhanced version), which I took from distance with my phone.
I would really appreciate your help. Thank you very much, in advance.
Best,
Vangelis
How you want your letter signed:  Anonymous

Immature Cockroach

Dear Vangelis,
This is an immature Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico – Semi desertic weather
Date: 02/09/2018
Time: 12:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found this dead bug inside my house, to me, looks like a cockroach or related but I am no expert at all, can you identify? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Victor

Harlequin Cockroach

Dear Victor,
This is a Cockroach, and it does not look to us like a species that infests homes.  We found a matching image on Angelfire on a page devoted to Cockroaches kept as pets where it is identified as a Harlequin Cockroach,
Neostylopyga rhombifolia, and the following information is provided:  “The Harlequin roach is certainly among the neatest looking of the pet roaches and is a very quick moving medium sized species. Nymphs start out life as a plain tan color but slowly molt to become very incredible looking adults. Harlequin roaches easily scale smooth surfaces and like most other glass climbers can be controlled by petroleum jelly. This is an egg laying species and fertility is sometimes a problem. Cultures either boom or bust so it is easy to rear a lot of specimens and easy for the culture to wipe out.”  The site also notes it is found in “Asia, Mexico, AZ (U.S.A.)” but the country of origin is not indicated.  BugGuide has no images, but does state “Circumtropical, of Asian origin.”  GotRoaches states:  “The Harlequin Roach (Neostylopyga Rhombifolia) originated in Indo-Malaysia, found is the northern part of Australia is now well established in various parts of the Western Hemisphere, including Mexico where it also migrated northward, near the Arizona border, few adults were also found in South California.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This critter
Geographic location of the bug:  Peru (tambopata)
Date: 12/18/2017
Time: 10:59 AM EDT
Hello, a few nights ago I hid under my mosquito net (and took the photo of it from there) from this, and forgot to ask our guide what it was. Google isn’t providing answers! It was about 5cm long.
How you want your letter signed:  Any help appreciated, thanks, Lucy

Cockroach

Dear Lucy,
This is some species of Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination