Currently viewing the category: "17 Year Cicadas"
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Subject: Brood X Cicadas emerging 4 years early
Location: Silver spring, MD
May 17, 2017 12:28 pm
Our cicadas aren’t supposed to emerge till 2021, but we are being flooded right now. I’ve never understood why some broods have 13 year cycles, other broods have 17 year cycles. Is it possible that our population of Brood X cicada, which last emerged in 2004, is converting from a 17-year cycle to a 13 year cycle? Is there a precedence for this?
Signature: Divya

Periodical Cicada: Brood X straggler

Dear Divya,
Thank you for sending in your marvelous images and for posing such an interesting theoretical question.  First thing is that not all Periodical Cicadas are the same species.  According to BugGuide, there are at least seven species in North America, with three of them being on a 17 year cycle and four on a 13 year cycle.  More northern species have a 17 year cycle while southern species are on a 13 year cycle.  According to Cicada Mania, 2017 will see the emergence of Brood VI, but there is a note that reads:  “If you’re in VA, MD, DC, DE, IN, TN, & OH head over to our Brood X straggler page.”  There is a further note that reads:  “Brood X stragglers are emerging in Tennessee (around Knoxville), Washington D.C., Virginia (counties around D.C.), Maryland (counties around D.C.), Ohio (around Cincinnati), Delaware, Indiana, & Kentucky! These stragglers are emerging 4 years ahead of time. HOT weather this week will cause even more to emerge, and they may begin to chorus (synchronized singing) as well.  Note: because of the significant number of cicadas emerging ahead of time, this might be an acceleration event. Periodical cicada accelerations occur when a significant group of an established brood emerge in years ahead of the main brood, and sometimes the accelerated group are able to reproduce and create what is essentially a new brood. Brood VI was likely part of Brood X at one point of time1. We’ll have to see if the Brood X stragglers are able to survive predation, and reproduce in significant numbers to sustain future populations.”   We would not discount global warming as a contributing factor in the acceleration.  We are featuring your submission on our home page banner.

Periodical Cicada: Brood X straggler

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Subject: Newly hatched Cicada
Location: Salisbury, NC
July 29, 2016 12:21 pm
Took this photo a few years ago, still one of my favorites. Thought you’d enjoy seeing it.
Signature: Heidi C.

Brood XIX Periodical Cicada

Brood XIX Periodical Cicada

Dear Heidi,
According to the file data, this image was taken on May 9, 2011 at 11:50 AM.  That makes this Periodical Cicada a member of Brood XIX, or the Great Southern Brood, according to USA Today.  This brood has a 13 year cycle, as opposed to the 17 year cycle of more northern broods.  Also, it appears that the lower creature in your image is a nymph that has not yet molted, and not an empty exuvia.  Earlier this year, we sent out a request for images of Brood V Periodical Cicadas, but alas, none were submitted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

June 19, 2016
We just returned from a trip to Ohio and we read in The Youngstown Vindicator that Brood V Periodical Cicadas had just begun to emerge in West Virginia.  Our cousin heard and saw them while fishing in Eastern Ohio, but we have no images to post.  Cicada Mania has a posting from a few days ago.  If you are in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, please send us your images of Brood V Periodical Cicadas so we can post them.  Thanks for your assistance.  We are using a Brood XIII individual taken by Venom in Glenview, Illinois in June 2007.  Periodical Cicadas emerge every 17 years or 13 years, depending upon the Brood, and they are sometimes called 17 Year Locusts, though they are unrelated Cicadas.

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Subject: regarding your cicada post
Location: atlanta
June 19, 2016 10:00 am
Signature: dee

Thanks dee,
Your nymph is not that of a Periodical Cicada, and Georgia is beyond the known range for Brood V, but your image is gorgeous.  So, we are still awaiting images of true Brood V Periodical Cicadas.

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Subject: Cicada killers
Location: Tennessee
June 4, 2015 3:47 pm
I was outside and saw these weird bugs eating a cicada. When I looked closee at the Bush they were everywhere. Some cicadas only had a few, but some were completely swarmed. You also can’t really tell in the pic but they have a spider man coloration in the sun.
Signature: -Brad

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Dear Brad,
This year marked the emergence of the The Lower Mississippi Valley Brood, Brood XXIII of the Periodical Cicadas,
Magicicada neotredecim, a species that appears every 13 years.  When the Cicadas are plentiful, they provide food for predators, including the Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs pictured in your image.  This is an awesome food chain image and it is a wonderful addition to our archive.  Folks can read more about Brood XXIII on Magicada.org where we read:  “2015 will be a remarkable year for periodical cicadas. 13-year Brood XXIII, the Mississipian Brood, and 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will both emerge.  The 2015 emergence of periodical cicadas will be extraordinary. 13-year Brood XXIII will emerge in the Mississippi River Valley. This brood contains all four described species of 13-year periodical cicadas- Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecim, M. tredecassini, and M. tredecula. 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will emerge along the western edge of the general periodical cicada range. This brood contains Magicicada septendecim, M. cassini, and M. septendecula. Thus, in 2015, you can see all seven described species of Magicicada.”  Supplied with that information, we don’t know for certain which species of Cicada you observed as so many generations are overlapping this year.  More about the Florida Predatory Stink Bugs can be found on Featured Creatures.

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Subject: periodical cicada update – laying eggs
Location: Jackson TN USA
May 24, 2015 12:27 pm
Now that our week of rain has slowed down the cicadas are calling and mating. Here is a female I spotted out by my clothes line laying eggs in a bush. The calling is so loud around our house you actually have to speak louder than normal outside to be heard.
Signature: Jess

Periodical Cicada Laying Eggs

Periodical Cicada Laying Eggs

Dear Jess,
Thanks so much for providing an update on your Periodical Cicada submission from last week.  We suspect that Brood XXIII may have a very limited distribution as we have not received any other submissions for this significant event.

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Subject: periodical cidacas
Location: Jackson, TN USA
May 15, 2015 1:13 pm
Just sharing. Our big tree is a hatching ground for brood XXIII this year (At least due to our location I think they are 13 year and not 17 year periodicals). I’ve been out every night and have seen a handful each time. Last night looked like a scene from a horror flick if you looked over your head there were more cicadas than leaves. It was raining bugs under that tree. Bats were dive bombing past us and scooping them off the trunk. The ground and trunk were literally crawling as 100’s if not 1000’s of them were headed to molt. We caught some video last night. I snapped some pics this am and figured I would share some of the various stages of them molting.
Love your page!
Signature: Jess

Thirteen Year Cicada

Thirteen Year Cicada

Dear Jess,
We are positively thrilled by your submission, and we will be featuring your images to document this Brood XXIII emergence of 13 Year Cicadas.  As you have indicated, Periodical Cicadas are divided into two main groups, those that remain underground for 17 years and those that remain underground for 13 years, and the latter are found in more southern states.  Additionally, populations are further divided into broods based on the years they emerge and the locations of those broods.  To further complicate matters, some individuals emerge earlier or later, and if those individuals encounter favorable conditions, new broods may eventually result.  According to Magicicada.org, Brood XXIII is known as “The Lower Mississippi Valley Brood.”  According to the Brood page on Magicicada.Org, your Brood XXIII individuals are right on schedule.  According to Cicada Mania:  “As of May 10th, it would appear that the emergence has begun in Louisiana and Tennessee as well.  The 2015 Brood XXIII emergence has begun! ”  Cicada Mania also notes:  “The cicada species that will emerge are
Magicicada tredecim (Walsh and Riley, 1868); Magicicada neotredecim Marshall and Cooley, 2000; Magicicada tredecassini Alexander and Moore, 1962; and Magicicada tredecula Alexander and Moore, 1962. These periodical cicadas have a 13-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 2002. According to John Cooley of Magicicada.org, Giant City State Park, Illinois is a good place to observe both M. tredecim and M. neotredecim.”   

Periodical Cicada:  Brood XXIII Molting

Periodical Cicada: Brood XXIII Molting

Periodical Cicadas:  Brood XXIII Emergance

Periodical Cicadas: Brood XXIII Emergence

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination