Currently viewing the category: "Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ring shaped bugs
Location: Glendale wisconsin
February 21, 2017 10:45 am
Hi, we recently moved to the Milwaukee area. When we first bought the house I found these ring shaped bug carcass..never any actual bugs. I thought that once we cleaned up (the house had been vacant for awhile) that it would be the end of them. But they keep showing up…not in the kitchen or bathroom, but mostly in the living room. None in the basement…can you tell me what they are? No other signs of critters in the house. Thanks
Signature: CMM

Millipede Remains

Dear CMM,
We can’t tell from your image if you have found Millipede exoskeletons or the remains of dead Millipedes.  They are generally associated with moist conditions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millipede assassin bug
Location: Dordrecht, Eastern Cape, South Africa
January 7, 2017 11:16 pm
Bugman
Here are my images, but I am unable to load three at a time so I am going to try and send them one by one.
Enjoy!
Signature: Lollie Venter

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
When you submitted a comment to a posting in our archives of Millipede Assassin Bugs preying on a Millipede, we did not imagine that your images were going to be as spectacular as they turned out to be.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.  According to Beetles in the Bush, the Millipede Assassin Bugs
:  “Ectrichodia crux belongs to the subfamily Ectrichodiinae, noted for their aposematic coloration – often red or yellow and black or metallic blue, and as specialist predators of Diplopoda (Heteropteran Systematics Lab @ UCR).  Species in this subfamily are most commonly found in leaf litter, hiding during the day under stones or amongst debris and leaving their shelters at night in search of millipedes (Scholtz and Holm 1985). They are ambush predators that slowly approach their prey before quickly grabbing the millipede and piercing the body with their proboscis, or “beak.”  Saliva containing paralytic toxins and cytolytic enzymes is injected into the body of the millipede to subdue the prey and initiate digestion of the body contents, which are then imbibed by the gregariously feeding assassin bugs.”

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
Thanks for sending us additional images.  We now have six of your images posted to our site.

Daniel,
The video is still in production.  Will send it as soon as it has been done.
Regards
Lollie

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bug with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Purple and white millipede
Location: Big Island, Hawaii
December 13, 2016 4:47 pm
Hi,
I was hoping you could help me identify this millipede, which was wandering around on a dirt road at the northern tip of the Big Island, Hawaii. I see lots of rusty millipedes in this area, but this is the first time I’ve seen one like this. It appears to be a purplish color with those broad white stripes along its back. Its antennae are also striped. It’s about an inch long.
I found a couple of photos online, including one on your site (https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2010/01/10/millipede-from-hawaii/), but no ID. Any help would be much appreciated.
Mahalo,
Signature: Graham

Millipede

Millipede

Dear Graham,
We are not certain your Millipede is the same as the one in our archives, though the markings do look similar.  BugGuide has an unidentified Millipede from Hawaii that looks just like your individual.  We haven’t had any luck finding out anything else.

Thanks for the response. I saw the BugGuide photo too, but since they don’t officially cover Hawaii, their IDs are a bit hit and miss for here. I guess I’ll have to keep looking. I’ll let you know if I get a positive ID.
Mahalo, Graham

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Sawfly larva?
Location: South Surrey, BC, Canada
July 24, 2016 12:18 pm
Hi Bugman,
I came upon several of these in my garden in South Surrey, BC, Canada in June, 2016. South Surrey is south of Vancouver, BC, near White Rock, just north of the USA border (WA State) — just in case your readers aren’t familiar with the local geography.
I had no idea what they are, but I think they look like your photo of a Sawfly larva. Are they harmful to plants or beneficial insects?
Thanks for your help.
Signature: Jerry Steinberg

Millipedes

Flatbacked Millipedes

Dear Jerry,
These are NOT Sawfly larvae.  They are Flatbacked Millipedes,
Harpaphe haydeniana, and according to BugGuide:  “This particular millipede secretes a dark fluid that has an odor similar to the almond extract used in cooking. Apparently this is a defensive manuveur. Millipedes also curl up in tight coils when threatened.  Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.”  According to Island Nature:  “the millipede can perform its duty as a ‘macroshredder,’ breaking up plant material and initiating the process of nutrient recyclying [sic] in the soil ecosystem … . In fact, it plays such an important role in the process that it can be considered to be a “keystone” species.”

Thanks so much!
Keep up the GREAT work!
Jerry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me identify this bug?
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
June 22, 2016 5:36 am
I find so many of these around and in my house during the summer months. They’re maybe an inch and half long and dark brown with many legs. They have to antennae sticking out from the front (at least that’s what I think they are). I don’t know how they keep getting in or what I can do to keep them out.
Signature: Sam

Greenhouse Millipede

Greenhouse Millipede

Dear Sam,
Your image is not of the highest quality, but this appears to be a Greenhouse Millipede,
Oxidus gracilis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Asia, introduced to North America and found throughout the lower 48 states and southern Canada.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Southern Ohio
June 18, 2016 4:02 pm
Found this creature in the woods, curled up in a ball. (Was around 1:30 in June).
Signature: Fallistar

Flatbacked Millipede

Flatbacked Millipede

Dear Fallistar,
We identified your colorful Flatbacked Millipede as
 Apheloria virginiensis corrugata on BugGuide where it states:  “Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up. ‘Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious.’ ~Rowland Shelley”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination