Currently viewing the category: "Centipedes and Millipedes"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and orange with yellow legs
Geographic location of the bug:  Williamsburg, VA
Date: 03/19/2019
Time: 08:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My two year old came across this bug while picking up rocks. She touched it and ran back to me saying “ouch!” over and over. There is a red mark on her finger. I don’t know if it bit her or stung her or if it has a substance on it. We have found them in our yard before, but never touched them. She probably did not see it and just reached down for a rock. She is fine, but I can’t find a picture that matched exactly. When it unrolls it has a black “face” area. Thank you in advance for your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Worried Mom

Colorful Millipede

Dear Worried Mom,
This is sure a colorful Millipede, and though we are not certain of the species, we believe it might be
Semionellus placidus which is pictured on BugGuide and reported from Virginia.  Of the family Xystodesmidae, BugGuide indicates:  “Many are brightly colored and all have stink glands.”  We seem to recall that some Millipedes can release cyanide as a defense, but we will need to do additional research on that matter.  We do not believe this colorful Millipede poses a threat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unkown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Malta, Europe.
Date: 02/03/2019
Time: 05:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, can you tell me what this bug is?
How you want your letter signed:  Mauro Cilia

House Centipede

Dear Mauro,
The House Centipede is a cosmopolitan, nocturnal predator that had adapted to cohabitation with humans.  While it is possible that a bite might occur, House Centipedes tend to flee.  Since House Centipedes pose no threat to the home, their predatory behavior might be considered beneficial since they eat Cockroaches, Spiders and other less welcome household intruders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  this bug dropped into my pond
Geographic location of the bug:  Noosa, Queensland Australia
Date: 12/08/2018
Time: 06:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy on the surface of my pond – guessing it dropped from the tree above??
How you want your letter signed:  Fi

Remains of a Centipede

Dear Fi,
Your image is of the partial remains of a Giant Centipede, possibly 
Ethmostigmus rubripes.  According to The Australian Museum:  “This is the largest native Australian centipede and is a member of the scolopendrid family.”  The site also states:  “The Giant Centipede ranges in colour from dark blue-green-brown to orange-yelllow.  It has black bands along the body and yellow legs and antenna.  The body is long and flatterned with 25 or 27 body segments and 21 or 23 pairs of legs. The first pair of legs behind the head are modified claws which curve around its head and can deliver venom into its prey. The venom is toxic to both mammals and insects, but does not appear to be strong enough to kill large animals quickly.”  We can only speculate on why you only discovered the posterior remains.  Perhaps a predator like a bird or lizard ate the front end of the Giant Centipede. 

Thanks.  Yes, that makes sense.
Fiona McComb

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify bug and if its bite poses a health issue to humans or animals
Geographic location of the bug:  Beaumont Tx
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 11:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was crawling up the wall of my bathroom.  The body was a little over an inch and with it’s legs about 2 inched.  First, I would like to know what it is and if it’s bite could cause issues to humans or dogs. I have never seen this crawling creature before.
How you want your letter signed:  Debra Leger

House Centipede

Dear Debra,
This is a House Centipede, a shy nocturnal predator that would rather flee a human or pet than to attack, but we suspect a large individual might bite a human who attempted to capture one with bare hands.  Though House Centipedes are venomous, the bite is not considered dangerous and would likely cause little more than a localized reaction.  Our editorial staff is perfectly content to cohabitate with House Centipedes, and we have a cat.  In our opinion, the benefits of having a nocturnal predator that will eat Cockroaches and other unwanted Household Pests, including dreaded Blood-Sucking Conenose Bugs or Kissing Bugs and Bed Bugs, far outweighs the unlikelihood of a bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Inhuman Centepede
Geographic location of the bug:  Bloomington, Indiana U.S.
Date: 08/02/2018
Time: 04:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am just curious as to what this is. I found it in the stairwell outside of my kids bedroom.
How you want your letter signed:  Mista Jay

House Centipede

Dear Mista Jay,
Though this is only our second posting of a House Centipede this year, it is still one of our Top Ten identification requests.  We were amused by your sly reference to the cult film The Human Centipede, but because we try to run a family friendly site, we will not be linking to any articles on one of the most luridly gross horror films ever made.

Thank you for the information! You set my mind at ease. I apologize for the R rated reference. I could submit a more family friendly version if you wanted me to.

Heavens no.  We don’t mind the reference, and as we stated, we were amused.  We just won’t link to any reviews or articles about The Human Centipede.

I see haha awesome. Thank you! Again, thank you for the information. If I wanted to keep this lil dude as a pet how should I go about building a habitat for it to live?
As the name implies, the House Centipede has adapted quite well to living with humans.  A small terrarium with a secure lid should suit is nicely.  It will eat crickets from the pet store as well as most any insect or arthropod you introduce into the terrarium.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please Identify this bug!
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles, California
Date: 03/05/2018
Time: 04:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in my apartment
How you want your letter signed:  Nat

House Centipede

Dear Nat,
This House Centipede is a beneficial nocturnal predator that is frequently found in homes.  We hope your released this prisoner outside.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination