Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

California Caterpillar
Can you help identify this little guy? I found him on a cement wall in Santa Cruz county California.
Thanks Victor Morris

Hi Victor,
Your photo looks remarkably like a Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata).
The Caterpillars of the Eastern Forest site describes this caterpillar as being: “Black at either end with 4 or 5 orange abdominal segments. Numerous thin white lashes arise from black segments—these distinguish it from woolly bear, which it superficially resembles. Orange abdominal band broken by red or black middorsal tufts. Food: prefers willows and poplars but will consume most any shrub or tree. Caterpillar: July to September; 1 generation.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Well way cool. 🙂 I’ve been to the site you mention, an excellent resource. I note you had a request for a better picture of swallowtail caterpillars. I’ll attach one of my better ones, taken recently. These two are feeding on volunteer fennel in our garden. I’m not positive, but these are likely Black Swallowtail caterpillars. THanks again for the IDs. Wonderful site. Bookmarked. I’ll be back often. I’ll send a separate note with a photo of a click beetle for your collection.
Jim

I’m glad we could be helpful Jim. I don’t know if you have Anise Swallowtails, Papilio zelicaon, in your area. The caterpillars of Black Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails look very similar. Thanks for the photo. It is pretty great.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I found this on my deck. Can you tell me what it is? I have attached a couple of pictures.

It is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio glaucus. This is a large, graceful yellow and black striped butterfly. The caterpillar is fond of wild cherry and other trees. Those false eyes are meant to scare hungry birds into thinking the benign caterpillar is a ferocious snake.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help – they are eating my herbs!
Hello Mr. Bugman;
I have thoroughly enjoyed your website; it is entertaining as well as educational. I’ve discovered it this summer and can’t wait to tell our biology teacher at school about this great site. I’m sure to be looking over the identification for this caterpillar, so would appreciate your help. These beautiful, however destructive, critters are munching away at my basil and dill. This is my first year with a small herb garden; I had no idea that I would have such hungry visitors! Would you please identify them for me. Thank you very much (sorry the picture is a little fuzzy),
Sharon
Oneonta , Alabama
( North Alabama )

Hi Sharon,
Thank you for the compliment. You have Black Swallowtail Caterpillars, Papilio asterius. They are called Carrot Worms by some people. They grow into a pretty black butterfly with yellow spots. The caterpillars have the ability to emit two orange horns and a foul odor when provoked. Send us a sharper photo if you can.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

black bristly caterpillar
Photo attached. This was found in Austin, Texas, walking near the handle of our patio door. He is predominantly black, bristly, with a brownish red head and three orange/red bands around the back end. Since he is lifting his front end, there may be more red bands, hard to tell. In terms of scale, this fellow is +/- 1.5 inches long. The hole in the picture is ~1/8th inch in diameter. THe nearby environment is a large flower garden filled with butterfly and hummingbird attracting plants (designed that way). Common medium-large butterflies in the garden recently include:
* various swallowtails (giant, pipevine, tiger)
* gulf fritillary
* hackberry spp.
* red admirals (not all that often)
* hummingbird clearwing moth
I’m familiar with these caterpillars, and this ain’t one of ’em. We also have commas/question marks. Is this one of them? We have many smaller butterflies (e.g. texas crescent, common hairstreak, fiery skipper) but I figure this guy isn’t a candidate for them, since he’s good sized. Hard to find a good site of caterpillar pictures.
THanks,
Jim

Hi Jim,
The caterpillar of Ecpantheria deflorata, the Eyed Tiger Moth, “is a deep black, clothed with black hairs, and at the junction of the somites, or segments of the body, it is banded with rings of crimson” according to Holland. Sounds like your caterpillar. The moth is found in your area and the caterpillar, one of the wooley bears, feeds on plantain, pr Plantago. We have a photo of the adult moth on our homepage right now. Here is a nice caterpillar identification site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I found this inchworm on my clematis flower. It is red in color. I can’t seem to find a “red” inchworm on the internet. Someone told me it is an inchworm because it has legs in the front and legs in the back, not in the middle, and it moves by moving its center up … like an inchworm. But is red or maybe dark pink in color. I have a picture but it is blurry. The first pic is on the flower. The second pic I took it off and put it on a napkin. It is very tiny so hard to take a pic with my camera.
Thanks,
Claire

Hi Claire,
Inchworms are the caterpillars of Geometrid Moths. Sorry, I don’t know of a pink or red caterpillar, but there is often little information on caterpillars. I will continue to check and possibly get back to you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination