Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this caterpillar?
Location: Michigan
July 14, 2017 7:15 pm
My husband found this on the garage floor today (July 14). He picked it up with a paper towel and it seemed to grab on to it. While trying to get pictures, he had a hard time separating it from his glove as it was holding on to that as well. I scoured the internet and cannot find anything remotely close to its image. I’m hoping you can help to identify it! Thank you for your time.
Signature: CuriousGeorge

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear CuriousGeorge,
Your image of an American Lappet Moth Caterpillar,
Phyllodesma americana, in its threat position is quite wonderful.  Here is an image on BugGuide of an individual’s ventral surface that shows the same markings as your individual, and this BugGuide image illustrates the threat position.  The BugGuide description is:  “Larva: body with blue, black/gray, white, and orange on the back, and densely hairy lobes (lappets) along sides; top of eighth abdominal segment with unpaired hump; when stretched out or alarmed, exposes bright orange band across top of second and third thoracic segments”

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant blue caterpillar!
Location: Pemba, Mozambique
July 13, 2017 12:38 pm
My sister found this giant caterpillar and I’ve since been curious as I can’t identify which species it belongs to.
Thanks
Signature: Honestly, I don’t know what this field means

Christmas Caterpillar

This is a Christmas Caterpillar or Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar, Nudaurelia cytherea.  According to Featured Creature:  “The caterpillar of the Pine Emperor Moth (Nudaurelia cytherea) isn’t exactly dressed for a glamorous ball but instead an ugly Christmas sweater party! It’s definitely looking festive with that big, fat, red santa-inspired body dotted with lime green, lemon, and light blue spots. I think the course gray hairs really add an extra touch of ‘ugly’ to the ugly Christmas sweater caterpillar feel, don’t you?”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Ashboro, North Carolina
July 12, 2017 7:25 am
We saw this bug on July 11th at the North Carolina Zoological Park in Ashboro, North Carolina. My 22 year old daughter took a video and showed it to an employee who said she had never seen anything like it and that it moved like a caterpillar
Signature: LeeAnne

Monkey Slug

Dear LeeAnne,
Though it does not look like other caterpillars, this Monkey Slug really is a caterpillar.  Handle with caution though, the Monkey Slug is capable of stinging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify a bug
Location: Princes Risborough, Herts
July 9, 2017 9:20 am
Can you help please?
I was wild camping in a wood near Princes Risborough, Hertfordshire last night and this beast fell out of a tree onto my mate’s arm.
Do you know what it is?
Incase this isn’t clear from the pics, this is his wrist, so the bug was about 6cm long. It seemed to rear up??
Many thanks
Signature: Ben Marwood

Lobster Caterpillar

Dear Ben,
Though it looks nothing like a typical Caterpillar, this Lobster Caterpillar is actually the immature form of a Moth in the family Notodontidae.  According to UK Moths:  “This unassuming species gets its English name not from the adult moth, but from the remarkable crustacean-like appearance of the caterpillar.”

Dear Daniel,
Thankyou so much for your reply. Was it unusual to find in the UK/Princes Risborough? I’ve Googled and seen a Japanese one that looks very similar
Best regards
Ben
Dear Ben,
The Lobster Caterpillar ranges throughout Eurasia, from England to Japan.  There are several British sites that include the
Lobster Moth Caterpillar, including UK Safari.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant blue spiked Caterpillar
Location: Central Portugal
July 9, 2017 4:59 am
I found this big guy in front of my house,
The Caterpillar is about 10cm long, and has tiny hairs on top of blue bumps that are on his green/brown body.
I found him on a hot day at the beginning of summer, it were about 38°C outside, so I carefully took him to a shadow and took these pictures.
I live in central Portugal.
Signature: Karl

Prepupal Great Peacock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Karl,
Many caterpillars change color just before pupation, and this prepupal Great Peacock Moth,
Saturnia pyri, is no exception.  It began life as a green caterpillar and now that it is ready to spin a cocoon and pupate, it has changed to an orange color.  Here is an Alamy image that depicts a prepupal Great Peacock Moth caterpillar.  Alamy also has a nice image depicting the entire life cycle of the Great Peacock Moth.  The green coloration is depicted on UK Moths where it states:  “Europe’s largest moth, although not British, has been found on one occasion, in Hampshire in 1984. However, being such a spectacular species, it is a favourite amongst livestock breeders, and is unlikely to occur here in the wild.  Abroad, the distribution ranges from southern Europe through Africa and the Middle East.  The adults fly from April to June and are easily attracted to light.   The impressive caterpillars feed on the foliage of a range of foodplants, primarily fruit trees.”  Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic has a nice comprehensive description of the Great Peacock Moth that includes this fascinating bit of information:  “Larger larvae are capable of ‘chirping’. These ‘chirps’ are broadband, with dominant peaks ranging between the sonic (3.7 kHz) and ultrasonic (55.1 kHz) and are generated by a rapid succession of mandibular ‘tooth strikes’. Chirp trains are induced by simulated predator attacks and precede or accompany the secretion of a defensive chemical from integumental bristles, supporting the hypothesis that these sounds function in acoustic aposematism. It has been proposed that these caterpillars generate multimodal warning signals (visual, chemical, and acoustic) to target the dominant sensory modalities of different predators, including birds, bats, and invertebrates (Bura, Fleming & Yack, 2009).”  Finally,  this Portuguese blog Natureza em Directo Borboletas has some nice images of the adult Great Peacock Moth.

Prepupal Great Peacock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: bulgaria
July 6, 2017 11:52 am
Hello, can you recognize this?
Signature: mr

Deathshead Hawkmoth Caterpillars

Dear mr,
These are Deathshead Hawkmoth Caterpillars, and the name refers to the markings on the adult Deathshead Hawkmoth.  The moth was prominently featured in advertising for the film Silence of the Lambs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination