Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail Catterpillar
Location: New Delhi India
January 4, 2017 4:55 am
Hi,
You’ve been very helpful till now, i found this fat big caterpillar, i think it is a swallowtail, but which species ?
thank you kindly
Signature: Aditi

Oleander Hawkmoth Hornworm

Dear Aditi,
This is not a Swallowtail Caterpillar, and it is not even a Butterfly Caterpillar, but rather a Hawkmoth Caterpillar, commonly called a Hornworm.  It is an Oleander Hawkmoth Hornworm.  It will mature into an Oleander Hawkmoth, so we are speculating there was an oleander shrub nearby.  The species is not found without oleander.

Hey Daniel,
I figured after sending you a request, as i was googling more caterpillars with black markings, we have Yellow Oleander trees in access. Thanks,
Aditi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

, anSubject: Black caterpillar with orange spikes
Location: South Africa
December 20, 2016 6:59 am
I would like to find out what butterfly or moth might be the adult of this black caterpillar with orange spikes and white spots found feeding (in groups) on a Pigeonwood tree (Trema orientalis) in our garden in South Africa.
Signature: Craig Morris

Saturniidae Caterpillar

Saturniidae Caterpillar

Dear Craig,
Your caterpillar will eventually metamorphose into a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  We are posting your submission as unidentified prior to beginning any research.  This morning is our last day in the office before catching a plane in a few hours for a holiday trip and we may not be able to provide a species name for you because of the time needed to research your caterpillar’s identity.  In our own archives we have an image of Predatory Hemipterans feeding on the caterpillar of
Imbrasia wahlbergi and it looks like the same species as your caterpillar.  Images posted to iSpot Nature confirm that identification.  We also have images in our archive of Gonimbrasia (Nudaurelia) wahlbergii and we believe they represent the same species. 

Dear Daniel
Thank you for your very speedy reply. That looks spot on – very similar to the Wahlberg’s Emperor Moth (Nudaurelia wahlbergi) found here.
I appreciate your help.
Have a good holiday.
Regards
Craig

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: sao paulo, brazil
November 29, 2016 5:21 pm
I have found many of this caterpillar all over a bindweed I have at my house’s garden. They are eating the leaves and I have got a burn when I stepped over one of them. I would like to know if it will become a butterfly – and therefore I should let them in peace – or if it is dangerous and I should kill them (in this case, what type of poison I should use).
Signature: Ana Elisa Salles

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ana Elisa,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the subfamily Lymantriinae, and many Tussock Moth Caterpillars have stinging hairs, as you learned.  The adult is a moth, not a butterfly, and we do not provide extermination advice.  Your caterpillar resembles North American Tussock Moths in the genus
Orgyia, but we have not found any images online from Brazil of black Tussock Moth Caterpillars with white tufts. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Coconut Creek
December 15, 2016 4:49 pm
I was wondering if you identify this caterpillar for me
Signature: Normal

Pink Striped Oakworm

Pink Striped Oakworm

Dear Normal,
This is one of the Oakworms in the genus Anisota, and we believe based on this BugGuide image that it is a Pink Striped Oakworm,
Anisota virginiensis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help
Location: Yucatan Peninsula
December 18, 2016 7:32 am
Bugman,
A friend of mine sent this pict to me. She is vacationing on the Yucatan peninsula. Can you identify this?
Signature: John

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear John,
This is either a North American Stinging Slug Caterpillar commonly called a Monkey Slug,
Phobetron pithecium, or a close relative in the same genus.  The adult moth is known as a Hag Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar, South Africa
Location: Pretoria, Villieria, South Africa
December 17, 2016 2:11 pm
I found my cat playing with this in my garden today, with a lot of interested birds hanging about. I rescued it and tried to put it in a safe place back into my garden after taking this pic. Couldn’t find it there later, so, hope it managed to hide itself again. Luckily it had no injuries.
It made a loud clicking sound with its mouthparts which I assume was a defence response to scare off any predators.
I’ve tried to google to find out what it is. The nearest thing I found was a sphinx moth caterpillar in America, but not this specific form which I assume is endemic to South Africa. I have seen sphinx moths growing up here as a child, but very rarely so. It has a tail spike which looks a bit like a flower stamen – it has little yellow nodules on it.
Hoping you guys can help out.
Signature: a wild gardener

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear wild gardener,
You are correct that this is the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  More specifically, it is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos.

Thanks! These moths are very rare, I hope the caterpillar makes it to mothood! :} Your link to the South African biodiversity site not longer works, herewith the updated link:
http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/lepidoptera/sphingidae/acherontia_atropos.htm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination