Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Identification
Location: Glendale CA
March 26, 2016 4:59 pm
I photographed this moth on the outside wall of my apartment building, next to the front door.
Date: March 26, 2016
Location: Glendale CA
I tried to identify it online, but no luck.
Can you tell me what moth this is and whether or not it is indigenous to California?
Thank-you for your help.
Signature: Bill in California

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Bill,
Not only is the Whitelined Sphinx indigenous to California, it can be found in all the continental United States as well as Mexico and Canada.  Caterpillars of the Whitelined Sphinx can be quite numerous in the deserts of the southwest when conditions are favorable, and when metamorphosis is complete, there are also large numbers of the adult White Lined Sphinx Moths seen feeding at dusk and dawn when they are frequently confused for hummingbirds because of they manner in which they fly.

Dear Daniel,
Thank-you so much for your extremely fast reply!
Before I contacted you, I looked up the entomology department
at UC Riverside, but they charge the general public $25.00 to
identity an insect. I am grateful that you have shared your
knowledge for free. Thank-you, again.
Sincerely,
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Magnificent looking exotic lava
Location: Plaza Bavaro, Punta Cana, Dominican republic
March 23, 2016 10:09 am
Hey! We went past this beautiful creature on our way to our hotel, and since its so beautiful we wanted to know what it evolves to some day. I hope you have the time, thank you!
Signature: Victor

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear Victor,
This little beauty is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma pugione, a species recently introduced to south Florida that we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”  The adult Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth is an effective wasp mimic.

Thanks a lot! What a wonderful service you guys/girls have!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede? In SoCal
Location: southern california
March 23, 2016 5:58 pm
Hi! my wife and I just got a new puppy, and as we were taking him out to the restroom he saw the attached bugs in our tree. we have noticed them dead on our front porch and crawling on our fence as well. Theres ~100 in the tree. We just need it identified to see if its poisonous and how to rid them of our yard so our pup doesn’t have the opportunity to eat them! Its spring, in southern california, been hot the past week.
Signature: kg

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Dear kg,
While we do have Centipedes in southern California, your images depict Mourning Cloak Caterpillars, and though they may deliver a slight sting if carelessly handled, they are harmless.  There is no need to eradicate them from your tree.  They may climb to the eaves of your home in groups to form chrysalides.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will eventually metamorphose into lovely adult Mourning Cloak butterflies.  Some years, when conditions are favorable, the Mourning Cloak Caterpillars can be quite numerous.  Their local native host is willow, but they have adapted to feeding on the leaves of Chinese elm in California.

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

Mourning Cloak Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Chrysalis
Location: Boulder, CO
March 20, 2016 3:03 pm
Hello,
We found a chrysalis tucked away in a lonely shoe about 3-4 months ago (Sept or Oct). A friend had left her leather dancing shoe under our couch, and when I picked it up, out fell this little guy. It was attached up near the toe by two silk anchors.
Sadly he fell quite a ways, I’m rather tall so he got the brunt of a 3 foot drop to our hardwood. The Chrysalis is currently hanging in a mason jar with ventilation, but I’m rather curious for more information about it. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -FC

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear FC,
This chrysalis belongs to a butterfly, not a moth.  We believe it is a Swallowtail Chrysalis.  Most Swallowtails produce upright chrysalides, that are held in that position by a silken girdle.  This Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis from BugGuide looks similar.

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Elizabeth Preger here!
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
March 20, 2016 9:56 am
I came across this beautiful caterpillar several years ago in Bangkok, Thailand. It was during the monsoon season and I found this creature crawling on the sidewalk during a dry day. I was struck by it’s bright yellow color, but had no idea what it was.
What is it bugman?
Signature: Your favorite model

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Elizabeth,
It did not take long for us to find a matching image on the Thailex website identifying this as a Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar, and the description that it has  ” black and yellow bands, an orangey head and legs, with some yellow markings, and some pale blue spots on the black bands. The hairs on the body are mostly whitish, yet there are two characteristic black-coloured bristles of long hairs at either side of the head.”  Searching with that common name, we found the scientific name
 Trabala vishnou on Project Noah, and we are curious if the species name relates to the Hindu deity.  The Nature and More website also has an image of the adult moth.
Now regarding your signature, you place us in a difficult position with your claim that you are our favorite model.  If we confirm that claim, then that might place us in the doghouse with other models, so we will refrain from the superlative, but we cannot deny that your ease and willingness before the camera jumpstarted our recent renaissance in both photography and film, and that photographs of you are among the best we have produced in recent years.  Thank you for being a muse.

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please tell me what this is
Location: Sydney
March 19, 2016 12:42 am
I saw this snail big thing once and didn’t even know what on earth it could be then saw it a second time and took a photo, is it possible to find out what it is?? The thing never even blinks
Signature: El

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear El,
This Hornworm is a Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hippotion celerio, and we confirmed its identity on Butterfly House.  The reason it never even blinked is that the “eyes” are actually markings known as ocelli that have evolved to fool predators into thinking the toothsome Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar is actually a dangerous predator with large eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination