Currently viewing the category: "Woolly Bears"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Waxhaw, NC
Date: 09/08/2018
Time: 04:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw it in some fresh laid hay used by our groundskeeper.
How you want your letter signed:  KathyS

Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear KathyS,
This is a Sycamore Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota harrisii, and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar stripping leaves on apple trees
Geographic location of the bug:  N. central NH
Date: 08/27/2018
Time: 04:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found my apple trees being stripped of leaves and these critters seem to be the obvious culprits. Can you identify it for me?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  David

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear David,
This is a Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota tessellaris, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on alder, ash, birch, elm, hazel, hickory, oak, poplar, tulip tree, walnut, willow.”  BugGuide does have a posting of an individual found under an apple tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow and Black Fuzzy Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgia… east of Atlanta
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 07:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bugman,
Found this guy running through our garage. He caught our attention because he was moving fast! Tried to search Google, but can’t find one that looks exactly right. I know there are a lot of different wooly bears, but none of them look quite like this one. The black bands have longer hairs than the yellow. We took this picture, then gently led him outside to the trees.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Georgia

Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Dear Curious in Georgia,
You are correct there are a lot of different Woolly Bear caterpillars, because according to BugGuide: “265 species in 88 genera listed at nearctica.com” which means there are 265 different caterpillars in the Tiger Moth subfamily.  As you can see from this BugGuide image, this appears to be a Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Late instar caterpillar mostly black with tufts of stiff black hairs of equal length radiating around body. Rolls up head to tail when disturbed. When curled, red intersegmental rings visible between the hairs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Milkweed
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thi dc is not a monarch caterpillar
How you want your letter signed:  Sue

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Sue,
Knowing the plant upon which an insect is found it is often extremely helpful for identification purposes, but not all insects are found on plants, so we don’t have a field for that purpose.  Milkweed is not a “Geographic location” and knowing if something was sighted in Pennsylvania or California or South Africa is also quite helpful, and every bug is found somewhere on the planet, which is why we have a Geographic location field on our submission form.  Having the Geographic location is also of assistance for persons scouring the internet for identification purposes, so we hope you will write back and provide an actual Geographic location so we don’t have to leave that field blank in our posting.  This is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar, one of the many species, like the Monarch caterpillar, that depends upon milkweed for survival.  We don’t understand what “Thi dc” means since we could not locate it in the dictionary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large cocoon like spider web
Geographic location of the bug:  Baldwin, Maryland
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 01:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of cocoon or web this is and what is inside it?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you, Michele

Fall Webworms

Dear Michele,
This appears to be a web full of Fall Webworms,
Hyphantria cunea.   Here is a BugGuide image of the caterpillars that are inside the web.  According to BugGuide:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts.  In the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow.  In the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tyria jacobaeae moth caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Silverdale, WA
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 04:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought you might like a photo of a Tyria jacobaeae (Cinnabar) moth  caterpillar, a species introduced into North America to help keep it’s host plant, Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy ragwort- flower shown  in photo) from over-proliferating.
Tyria jacobaeae is used in conjunction with Longitarsus jacobaeae (the Tansy ragwort flea beetle) for Tansy population control.
Although Tyria jacobaeae will feed on a couple of native plant species, it is my understanding that the frequency of this occuring does not seem to be of concern.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug aficionado

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bug aficionado,
Thanks for sending us a new image of a Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar and also thanks so much for the informative description.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination