Currently viewing the category: "Tent Caterpillars and Kin"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nest
Location: Southwestern Pennsylvania 18mi north of Pittsburgh
May 19, 2013 10:17 pm
Today I photographed and interesting cocoon like nest, with a bunch of something(maybe insects) inside.
I’ve never seen a nest like this in the trees. It may, for all I know, it may be a small, tent caterpillar’s nest.
But the ones I’ve always seen are much larger.
I didn’t dig into the nest to find out ’cause I didn’t want to intrude on the bugs. Any Ideas?
Signature: Rich

Nest might belong to Tent Caterpillars

Nest might belong to Tent Caterpillars

Dear Rich,
We agree with you that this might be the newly started nest of a recently hatched colony of Eastern Tent Caterpillars.  We will try to get a second opinion from Eric Eaton.  More information on the Eastern Tent Caterpillar can be found on BugGuide.  As an aside, we will be flying into Pittsburgh in a few weeks to visit family.

Possibly Tent Caterpillar Nest

Possibly Tent Caterpillar Nest

Eric Eaton provides another possibility
Daniel:
Tough call.  I’m thinking Fall Webworm, as they tend to make webs on the outer reaches of branches, whereas tent caterpillars build webs in the crotches of branches, often several “tents” to one tree, or in a series of trees close to each other.  Fall Webworm tends to have more isolated colonies.
Eric

Thank you so much for the return email.
Have a good trip and a great stay at, “Da Burgh”.
Thank you both again for the rapid response and ID.
Isn’t it a bit early for webber caterpillars to appear?
Richard Rich

Once we received Eric’s response, we pondered the time of year.  Tent Caterpillars already have established nests in the spring and Fall Webworms are most noticeable later in the season, but they do begin hatching earlier.  Your “nest” might be the beginning of what will become a substantial “web” later this year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Cyprus mediterranean ocean
November 18, 2012 2:44 am
i owned 4 of these before all the way to moth stage and i know they’re some kind of southern or western tent caterpillar, the moths are almost exactly the same but i just cant find anything on the internet that looks exactly like it
Signature: tatiana h

Oak Eggar Caterpillar

Hi Tatiana,
By taking a circuitous route, we believe we have identified this caterpillar as an Oak Eggar Caterpillar,
Lasiocampa quercus.  We started with the Insects of Cyprus website and found this photo of a moth and then searched its scientific name until we found this image of the caterpillar on a French website that looks identical to your individual.  More photos can be found on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa website and more photos and information are available on the UK Mothswebsite which states:  “The larvae change considerably in appearance during development, and care should be taken not to confuse early instars with the larvae of other eggars (Trichiura, Eriogaster and Lasiocampa species). Fox moth (Macrothylacia rubi) and the Drinker (Euthrix potatoria) should be checked when identifying last instar larvae. Early instar larvae from moorlands are often duller, especially on the dorsum, than larvae from other habitats.”  We suspect there is much local variability in the coloration and markings of the caterpillars.  

Oak Eggar Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need help with caterpillar
Location: Northwest Oregon
September 25, 2012 11:18 pm
Hi there,
I am a photographer and I would like to know what kind of caterpillar I photographed.
It is about 2 inches long and is a little hairy. I attached a picture to help you figure out what it is.
Best regards,
S.D.
Signature: S.D.

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Hi S.D.
In our opinion, this is the caterpillar of the American Lappet Moth,
Phyllodesma americana.  You may read about the American Lappet Moth Caterpillar on BugGuide where it states:  “Caterpillars feed on leaves of alder, birch, oak, poplar, willow, snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), chinquapin (Chrysolepis chrysophylla), and members of the rose family; larvae rest longitudinally along a twig during the day, and feed at night” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BIG Caterpillar..
Location: Goa, India
May 21, 2012 12:36 pm
Hi, This beauty frightened the life out of a clothing stall-holder while i was walking past. The photo was taken in January 2012 in the state of Goa in India, and i’d love to know what kind of butterfly/moth it would eventually turn in to. The length was a very impressive six or seven inches!!
Thanks for your help 🙂
Signature: Mike

Tea Oil Caterpillar

Hi Mike,
This Moth Caterpillar looks very familiar and we believe there is another example in our archives, however we cannot remember what it was identified as and we didn’t have any luck finding it in our initial attempt.  When time permits, we will return to your identification request.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck and post a comment.

Tea Oil Caterpillar

Ed. NOte:  Thanks to a tip from lepidopterist Julian Donahue, we were informed that this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae.  We narrowed our search in the archives and located a match with the Tea Oil Caterpillar submitted from Malaysia a year and a half ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help a Photographer out, please
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
May 21, 2012 8:34 pm
Hello,
I’m a photographer and I love these two images I’ve attached. However, I have no idea what the insect is and would like to provide that information to clients potentially wanting to purchase prints.
It’s the same bug in both images.
Thanks for any help!
Signature: Adam Kerr

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Hi Adam,
These are photos of a Forest Tent Caterpillar,
Malacosoma disstria, a common species east of the Mississippi River.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Blue/turquiose caterpillar
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
April 17, 2012 11:29 pm
What kind of caterpillar is this? I found him in my backyard a couple of weeks ago crawling on some mulch.
Signature: Suzanne

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Dear Suzanne,
This beautiful caterpillar is a Forest Tent Caterpillar,
Malacosoma disstria.  According to BugGuide, there is:  “One generation per year; larvae spin silken mats on tree trunks and large branches where they congregate to molt or rest from feeding; larvae also deposit silk in strands along which they travel to and from feeding sites; overwinters as larva in masses surrounding tree branches. (Unlike Eastern Tent Caterpillar, this species does not form silken tents.)”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination