Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Marin County, Ca
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, Woman or Bugster,  Can you tell me what these gorgeous creatures emerging are?  They’re on my redwood siding, and there’s a second wee house not yet ready to disgorge its person/s.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much!

Mating Lappet Moths

These appear to be mating Lappet Moths in the genus Tolype, with the remains of a cocoon.  We suspect the cocoon originally housed the female in the pair, and the male sensed her pheromones once she emerged.  Based on images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, we suspect the species is Tolype distincta.  Thanks for also including a good image of the cocoon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester pool on the Trent Severn waterway
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A caterpillar like this stung my son last weekend. After it crawled across his hand he had a double track of very itchy sore spots
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Pam,
We needed to research your location which we mistakenly thought was in the UK.  Now that we know you are in Ontario, Canada, your son being stung by an Io Moth Caterpillar makes sense.  This is a North American species with a well documented history of stinging.  According to Poison Help:  “The nettling organs are borne on fleshy tubercles, and the spines are usually yellow with black tips. The spines are connected to poison glands.”  You may also read about them on Entomology University of Kentucky.  To the best of our knowledge, the reaction is localized and though painful, the sting is not a cause of concern, though we would always recommend seeking medical advice if there are any concerns.

Thank you very much!  Will pass on the info to my son.
Pam
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar we’ve never seen
Geographic location of the bug:  Belfast, Maine
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 12:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this caterpillar this morning in our yard.  We simply can’t find any one similar in trying to identify what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Katie

Paddle Caterpillar

Dear Katie,
The Paddle Caterpillar,
Acronicta funeralis, is surely a distinctive species.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, apple, birch, blueberry/huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.), cottonwood, dogwood, elm, hazel, hickory, maple, oak, willow.”

Thank you so much!!  My daughter will be ecstatic to know we got a reply.  We truly appreciate it!
Katie
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Request for Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Badlapur ,District- Thane,state- Maharashtra, India
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 01:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Got sting from same(image Attached) today in my backyards on wrists it was very painful.
Got bump on sting area.
Requesting Information
How you want your letter signed:  Subhash D

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Subhash D,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and stings are reported to be quite painful.  We have not had any luck finding a close visual match to your caterpillar, but this image from Learn About Butterflies does illustrate the physical family traits generally associated with Stinging Slug Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Angela, Montana
Date: 08/07/2019
Time: 02:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My daughter found this by some of our grain bins and she loves bugs. Just curious what kind it was. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Hadlie Mae

Glover’s Silkmoth Caterpillar: Hyalophora species

Dear Hadlie,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus Hyalophora, but we are not certain of the species.  BugGuide recognizes three species in North America, and BugGuide reports two of those species, the Ceanothus Silkmoth and the Columbia Silkmoth from Montana, and the third species, the Cecropia Moth, is reported from the nearby Dakotas as well as Wyoming, and since Angela, Montana is in the eastern half of the state, we would not rule out the Cecropia Moth.  We will try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can distinguish the actual species.  Here is a BugGuide image of the Glover’s Silkmoth Caterpillar, the western subspecies of the Columbia Silkmoth.  We suspect your caterpillar is preparing to spin a cocoon.

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar: Hyalophora species

Thank you! He stared to change the night we emailed you.

Giant Silkmoth Cocoon

Hi again Hadlie,
Thanks so much for sending in images of the cocoon spun by your Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar.  We are hoping to hear back from Bill Oehlke regarding a species identification.

I am pretty sure it is Columbia gloveri due to three sets of orangey dorsal scoli instead of two sets in cecropia. Both species are likely present in Rosebud County.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rare Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern New Jersey
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 07:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This weird/rare looking insect is eating the leaves on our Asian pear tree & when my husband pulled one off a leaf it stung him & left his skin feeling temporarily numb.
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon Beningo

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Sharon,
The Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, is not considered rare, and BugGuide reports sightings in much of eastern North America.  The stinging capability of the Saddleback Caterpillar is well documented, including on Featured Creatures where it states:  “Color patterns are aposematic, or having bright warning colors that denote toxicity or distastefulness” and “The large spines and potent hemolytic venom rank it as one of the most important North American species of urticating caterpillars.”

Thanks so much for your quick response. We will definitely not be touching any more of them!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination